Sobriety Codependency North Jersey Recovery Center - A woman struggling with addiction is co-dependent on her husband during the path to recovery, which can be considered Sobriety Codependency

Sobriety Codependency

Last Updated: Oct 1st 2020

Reviewed by njrc

Co-Dependency and a Person’s Healthy Relationships

Co-dependency is a term popularly used when discussing sobriety.

Mental Health America defines co-dependency as a condition that affects a person’s ability to have healthy relationships, a condition often referred to as relationship addiction.

The relationships formed as a result of co-dependency can be one-sided and often toxic.

Those is recovery have a tend to build co-dependent relationships.

Meeting other people recovering from addiction can be tricky.

Putting the Needs of Other People First

Co-dependent relationships see one person continually putting the needs of the other person above their own.

Most co-dependent relationships involving recovering addicts usually involve a sober party who may act as a caretaker.

Co-dependent relationships are, by nature, very demanding.

There are several different sides to co-dependent relationships.

Unfortunately, most of the effects of co-dependency are harmful and counterproductive to addiction recovery.

How Does Co-Dependency Work

There is usually a structure to the nature of a co-dependent relationship.

The motivation behind co-dependency is often a deep-seated fear of being alone.

This fear of being alone makes people in co-dependent relationships go to great lengths to preserve these relationships.

Co-dependent relationships have two major roles.

Every co-dependent relationship has an enabler and a manipulator.

Several different factors may be responsible for why a person is co-dependent.

Co-dependents are usually the products of mental illness, dysfunctional homes, or childhood abuse.

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Enabler

An enabler, as the name implies, enables the other party by encouraging or allowing certain behavior.  

Enablers are usually passive people; in most cases, they allow things to happen to them.

Overtime in the relationship, enablers slowly lose their sense of identity to the other party.

Certain personality traits are usually associated with enablers. Traits like low self-esteem and a compulsive desire to please are characteristic of enablers.

Manipulator

In most co-dependent cases, the person struggling with addiction is the manipulator.

A manipulator takes advantage of the weaknesses of the enabler to have their way.

A manipulator may be aggressive or passive, depending on their personality types.

By preying on the weaknesses of the enabler, the manipulator can have their way.

Manipulators are takers in a co-dependent relationship.

Co-dependency is a significant threat to sobriety.

For someone in recovery, either of these two positions in a co-dependent relationship is bad.

As an enabler or a manipulator, a co-dependent relationship may catalyze relapse.

Negative Effects of Co-Dependency on Sobriety

One of the most obvious and major effects of co-dependency is its strain on those in the recovery process.

In situations where both parties used to abuse substances together, a co-dependent relationship is unhealthy.

When a recovering addict is focused on sobriety and has a manipulator partner, there is a risk of relapse.

It is not uncommon for one party to make the drug use a condition for a relationship.

Unfortunately, this may make the party trying to stay sober relapse.

Being co-dependent on a person does not help sobriety.

In some cases, a partner might intentionally cause a relapse.

Some partners prefer the dynamic of their relationships with substance abuse.

Getting used to a particular way of life with a partner might lead a manipulator to undermine recovery.

In other cases, the issue may not even be drug use.

There is a tendency for individuals in recovery to substitute one addiction with another, which is very unhealthy.

Although a person in recovery may not manipulate their partner for drugs, they may do so for other things.

There is also a tendency for partners to enable their sober partners as they pick up new addictions.

A co-dependency relationship may make it difficult for relapses to be addressed swiftly.

Enablers in these relationships might cover such incidents up for the recovering addict.

Treatment for Co-Dependency

Co-dependency can be treated, much like any other illness.

Treating co-dependency is essential. An example of a sobriety co-dependency is AA co-dependency.

It is important to ensure that your sobriety rests in your hands alone.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, our professionals are available to help you manage any co-dependency issues that you may have, such as AA codependency.

Treatment must begin with one party admitting that there is a problem.

There must be a genuine desire to solve the issue of co-dependency, like that of AA codependency.

Once a genuine willingness for treatment has been expressed, the process of treatment can begin.

Treatment for co-dependency may involve a number of different issues.

Where alcohol and substance abuse is ongoing, special treatment may need to be administered first.

It is generally agreed upon that psychotherapy is the most effective treatment for co-dependency.

Treatment is administered in stages; the first involves the individual, and then it involves the couples, and finally, it involves group therapy.

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Individual Therapy

Individual therapy involves one-on-one sessions with our licensed therapists at North Jersey Recovery Center.

This therapy is focused on observing why a partner may be co-dependent, such as for AA codependency.

It usually involves an in-depth analysis of emotions to discover the underlying reasons for behavior.

Group Therapy

In group therapy, those in recovery can discuss with other people who have gone through the same experiences.

In this therapy, you can discuss all types of sobriety co-dependency aspects, such as AA co-dependency.

Couples Counseling

In this stage, co-dependent partners can receive counseling on how to establish a more balanced relationship.

By analyzing situations, our therapists can help you recognize situations that are unhealthy for your relationship.

Each of these steps of therapy is essential for full and complete recovery.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we pride ourselves on offering the best quality of services to all of our clients.

If you or your partner require addiction treatment, our facilities are the best place to receive this.

We offer inpatient and outpatient treatment alongside Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

Your desire to be better is combined with our expertise to produce the best results possible.

We believe that you deserve to live the best quality of life possible.

We offer you access to a full team of therapists, medical professionals, and trained counselors.

Addiction Treatment at North Jersey Recovery Center

We ensure that all of our patients get the best treatment, especially for AA codependency.

This is why we offer free insurance verification.

We will contact your insurance company on your behalf to specify the nature of the treatment that you require.

We also accept PPO insurance in addition to private forms of payment for treatments received.

Our trained personnel are available to ensure that you receive full insurance benefits for your treatment.

Your full recovery is our major priority.

Reviewed for Medical & Clinical Accuracy by njrc

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