Snorting Xanax or Other Benzodiazepines North Jersey Recovery Center - A man is using his fist to crush up Xanax and other benzodiazepines as he prepares for snorting Xanax to achieve the high the substance provides more quickly than swallowing the pill.

Snorting Xanax or Other Benzodiazepines

Is Snorting Xanax Dangerous?

Although it may appear safe because it is a brand-name prescription drug, snorting Xanax is incredibly dangerous.

It can be dangerous to use Xanax recreationally at all.

When someone snorts Xanax, it leads to a faster high but also results in more pronounced symptoms.

Snorting benzos, like Xanax, can also increase the likelihood of becoming addicted.

What is Xanax?

Xanax is a brand-name drug.

The generic name is alprazolam.

As a benzodiazepine, Xanax can help treat panic disorders and anxiety.

At times, it can be used for the treatment of insomnia and seizures.

Xanax is meant for short-term treatment, not a long-term medication for anxiety and other disorders.

If taken as instructed and only by prescription, Xanax is considered safe. However, someone who is snorting crushed Xanax is at risk for serious health effects. When someone takes Xanax, it calms abnormal excitatory behavior in the brain.

The drug has a calming effect on the brain and the entire central nervous system overall. It works by increasing the effects of an inhibitory brain chemical called GABA.

Xanax should not be mixed with other substances, especially with alcohol or opioids.

Alcohol and Xanax

Alcohol and Xanax slow down the central nervous system.

When combined with Xanax, it can lead to severe impairment or overdose. While it is a prescription drug, many people show signs of Xanax abuse.

Xanax can create a relaxing high when used alone. The effects can be amplified when it’s combined with other substances.

Common side effects of Xanax include:

  • Low energy
  • Depression
  • Headache
  • Confusion
  • Feeling lightheaded
  • Fainting
  • Dizziness
  • Impaired coordination
  • Memory impairment
  • Decreased libido
  • Confusion
  • Dry mouth

How Do You Take Xanax?

Typically, when you take Xanax, you do so orally.

You may be prescribed Xanax as a tablet or an extended-release tablet. There are also liquid oral solutions.

Your doctor should prescribe a dosage based on why you’re taking it, how you respond to treatment, and your weight — among other factors.

If you have a prescription, you must never take Xanax outside of how it’s prescribed. Taking Xanax in any way other than how it’s prescribed may be characterized as misuse and can be dangerous.

For example, chewing or breaking the tablets, particularly if it’s a time-release version, would mean all of the drug was released at one time.

Can You Snort Xanax?

Unfortunately, one of the most common ways to abuse Xanax is by snorting it.

When someone is snorting Xanax, they may feel the effects faster, which is one reason for doing it. Some people feel that they get more of a “high” by snorting Xanax as well.

If someone is snorting Xanax, they may be more likely to experience side effects, such as aggression, depression, or psychosis. You may also develop tolerance faster when you misuse Xanax in this way.

A tolerance occurs when your body becomes used to the effects of a drug. You then have to take larger doses to get the same effects and compensate for the shifts in your body and brain resulting from your tolerance.

If you develop a tolerance to Xanax, you may be physically dependent. When you’re physically dependent, you will likely go through withdrawal if you stop using Xanax abruptly.

Xanax withdrawal can be extremely severe and even life-threatening. Some possible withdrawal symptoms can include:

  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Insomnia
  • Severe anxiety
  • Seizures
  • Increased anxiety
  • Worsening depression
  • Panic attacks
  • Restlessness
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Seizures or tremors

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Does Addiction Risk Increase When Snorting Xanax?

Xanax is a potentially addictive substance.

With Xanax addiction, your use of the substance becomes out of your control. Addiction is a chronic, relapsing disorder, but it is treatable.

When you misuse Xanax, as would be the case if you were snorting it, it increases the likelihood of an addiction-forming.

Common signs someone is abusing or addicted to Xanax may include:

  • Chronic drowsiness
  • Slurred speech
  • Coordination problems
  • Withdrawing from friends or family
  • Manic moods
  • Memory problems
  • Lack of motivation
  • Unsuccessful attempts to cut back or stop using the drug
  • Strong cravings
  • Focusing almost entirely on obtaining more or using Xanax
  • Financial or legal problems

What Should You Do if Someone is Snorting Xanax?

Whether you might have a problem with Xanax personally or know someone who does, it’s essential to take action.

An addiction treatment program is likely the best option. Again, addiction is treatable.

However, as with any chronic disease, the longer it goes untreated, the worse it gets.

Detox from Xanax

Due to Xanax’s withdrawal’s potentially severe symptoms, it’s advisable to do a medical detox before starting treatment.

Medical detox provides patients with a safe and clinical environment as they go through difficult withdrawal symptoms.

Patients can be monitored and care for during this time so that they are as comfortable as possible. Detox is not an addiction treatment program on its own.

It’s just a way to deal with physical symptoms of withdrawal and drug dependence, but it is a necessary first step.

Types of Xanax Treatment Programs

Once someone has fully detoxed, they can begin treatment. There are different types of benzodiazepine treatment programs.

One unique option is the Partial-Care Program that North Jersey Recovery Center offers. The Partial-Care Program integrates elements of both inpatient and outpatient treatment.

Partial-Care is similar to residential treatment in that you participate in therapy most of the day throughout the week. The big difference is you can return home at night.

Inpatient treatment requires you to live onsite for a period of time. There are benefits to this, such as the fact that it can take you away from a potentially negative or triggering environment.

There’s also outpatient rehab for benzodiazepine addiction.

It may also be something you do following Partial-Care or intensive outpatient care. A critical part of your treatment plan should always include a relapse prevention strategy.

Recovery is something you work on throughout your life.

A relapse prevention strategy can include ongoing therapy, medication management, and participation in weekly 12-step meetings.

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Paying for Xanax Addiction Treatment

If you or your loved one needs addiction treatment, it can save your life to take the first step and contact North Jersey Recovery Center.

Our compassionate, expert providers can verify your insurance coverage and answer any questions you may have. We help you learn more about treatment for Xanax and other substances so that you know what to expect.

Understanding the Risks of Snorting Xanax

Anytime you abuse a substance like Xanax, there are risks. These risks can include mental and physical health complications.

Abusing substances can also lead to dependence and addiction. If you are snorting Xanax, you are using it outside of how it’s meant to be used.

That means that you can benefit from professional addiction treatment.

Learn more about overcoming a habit of snorting Xanax by reaching out to North Jersey Recovery Center today.

Heroin Withdrawal and Detox North Jersey Recovery Center - A young male is sitting on the street with his head in his hands as he starts to feel the effects of heroin withdrawal symptoms.

Heroin Withdrawal and Detox

Heroin Addiction

Addictions to this powerful and dangerous opioid drug come with troubling heroin withdrawal symptoms.

Your body and brain quickly become reliant on the effects that it produces.

And heroin withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings can make it difficult for you to quit on your own.

Heroin is a Schedule I drug that has no approved medical uses and a high potential for addiction.

Still, in 2016, about 948,000 Americans had used heroin within the last year.

Most graduated to heroin after becoming addicted to prescription opioids.

If this story sounds familiar, help is available.

Common Forms of Heroin

In any form, heroin is addictive and may cause heroin withdrawal symptoms with prolonged use.

The most common form is that of a white or brown powder. Sticky black tar heroin is the second most common form.

Heroin users do not typically start with this powerful and addictive opioid. As we mentioned before, most heroin users try it after developing a tolerance to prescriptions like Vicodin and Percocet. These prescription opioids produce side effects that reduce physical pain and reduce your anxiety to make you feel more relaxed.

But after prolonged prescription opioid abuse, the effects become weaker. For this reason, many people who are addicted to prescription opioids eventually seek something stronger.

Heroin produces similar effects to prescription opioids and is cheaper, more potent, and easier to find. Unfortunately, heroin is also more dangerous.

If your heroin withdrawal symptoms have prevented you from quitting, we can help.

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Problems Related to Untreated Heroin Withdrawal Symptoms

Heroin addictions can run rampant and leave you feeling powerless if left untreated.

Heroin addiction can impact everything from your finances and criminal record to your career and relationships.

Heroin is one of the most frequently smuggled illicit drugs, and heroin seizures have been rising over the last decade. As such, sentencing for heroin-related crimes has increased over the last decade.

But the most pressing concern is the number of heroin-related deaths. In just the state of California, 45% of drug overdose deaths involved opioids in 2018.

Heroin is a powerful and dangerous opioid that rewires your brain’s chemistry. Do not let it control your life for one more day.

Early Signs of Heroin Withdrawal

One of the most common signs of heroin withdrawal symptoms is the overwhelming urge to seek more.

If your drug-seeking behaviors keep you from completing tasks, working, or spending time with family and friends, you are likely addicted. If your drug cravings make you act out-of-character, these are clear signs that you will face more heroin withdrawal symptoms soon.

However, hope is not lost. You do not have to live with your withdrawal symptoms, drug cravings, or drug-seeking behaviors. Our comprehensive addiction programs help you overcome obstacles such as these.

Heroin Withdrawal Symptoms

Heroin withdrawal symptoms are more physical than psychological.

These symptoms can be intense. In some cases, they may be severe. Severe symptoms are one reason why medical professionals do not recommend users try to stop abruptly on their own.

Our high-level monitored, and professionally run drug detox programs handle situations like this. Heroin withdrawal symptoms can occur as soon as within a few hours after your last use.

Some of the most common ones may include:

  • Restlessness
  • Bone and muscle pain
  • Insomnia
  • Vomiting or diarrhea
  • Cold flashes
  • Leg twitches

Drug cravings are the symptom that most often lead to relapse.

The extent and severity of your withdrawal symptoms may vary depending on different individual factors. For example, factors such as the duration you have been using, the amount of the substance you usually intake, and the ingestion method you use can impact your detox process.

Whichever withdrawal symptoms you experience, we will be by your side to help you through them. If necessary, we may use certain approved and professionally administered medications to ease your withdrawal symptoms and help you to feel stronger in a quicker time period.

How to Cope with Heroin Withdrawal Symptoms 

If you are wondering how to cope with heroin withdrawal symptoms, you are not alone. Withdrawal symptoms are a problem that thousands of individuals face each year. Heroin withdrawal symptoms lead many people to relapse or avoid quitting altogether for fear of what will happen.

But taking back control of your life from your heroin addiction is worth the effort. And we will walk you through the process. Our medical detox will help ease your heroin withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings to pave the way to a smooth recovery.

Our comprehensive and customized treatment programs will help you evaluate and address temptations, triggers, and unhealthy thought patterns and behaviors. We help you flip these into healthier, more positive thoughts and actions.

You do not have to face your heroin withdrawal symptoms or your addiction alone. We are here to help every step of the way.

Heroin Rehab Options

Overcoming your heroin withdrawal symptoms is the start of your recovery. Long-term sobriety and health require long-term efforts. And remaining in treatment for the appropriate amount of time gives you the tools and resources you need to avoid relapse.

However, please know that you are not alone if you do relapse. Many people relapse each day. Addiction is a chronic and controlling disease. It takes a dedicated effort and a strong, supportive team for lasting success.

Chronic addiction is one reason why we offer such a wide variety of addiction treatment options.

Your customized addiction treatment will likely start with an assisted detox to rid yourself of the heroin in your body.

Inpatient and outpatient treatment programs are two of the most common rehab options. With an addiction as intense and overwhelming as heroin can be, inpatient treatment programs are often better. These provide 24-hour access to care, support, and guidance.

However, not everyone can commit to a full-time program. In these instances, we offer outpatient support, aftercare services, intensive outpatient programs, and more to fill in the gaps.

We work with you to determine the care methods and programs that best fulfill your needs.

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Paying for Heroin Rehab

Paying for heroin detox and rehab may be easier than you might think.

Most major health insurance providers offer coverage for addiction health treatments. Your provider may offer full or partial coverage for the services you are seeking.

If you are unsure of your plan’s coverage, please call our admissions department. Someone is available 24/7 to review and verify your insurance for you. The process is fast, free, and easy.

North Jersey Recovery Center

Heroin is an addictive and dangerous drug.

But your heroin withdrawal symptoms will only continue to control your life if you let them.

The best time to change your life is this very moment.

Why wait another day to overcome your heroin addiction?

We give you access to the resources, training, therapies, and support you need to move forward instead of dwelling in the past.

All you have to do is make the call.

How Long Do Opioids Stay in Your System? North Jersey Recovery Center - A young woman is speaking with an addiction therapist and asking, "How long do opiates stay in your system?" while reviewing her options for treatment to break free from opioid addiction.

How Long Do Opioids Stay in Your System?

How Long Do Opiates Stay in Your System?

How long do opiates stay in your system, and what affects this? These are common questions from many individuals struggling with opioid addiction.

The short answer is it depends.

Both opioids and opiates affect the brain and body similarly, but there are different types. For example, there are prescription opioids and illegal opioids.

The type of opioid or opiate and how it is used impacts how long it stays in your system.

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What are Opioids?

First, what are opioids? Opioids are a class of drugs that include heroin, which is illegal. This drug class also includes synthetic opioids, such as fentanyl.

Pain medications available by prescription are also opioids. Prescription pain relievers include oxycodone, hydrocodone, morphine, and codeine.

Opioids and opiates are effective as short-term pain relievers, but they are very addictive. Opioid addiction has led to the so-called opioid epidemic. Tens of thousands of people die each year due to opioid overdoses.

While there are different types of opioids, all affect certain receptors in the brain and body.

Along with pain relief, opioids can cause drowsiness, nausea, and constipation.

They can also cause euphoria, known as being high.

When exploring the question of how long do opiates stay in your system, it’s best to break them down into categories. The general categories for reference are prescription opioids, fentanyl, and heroin.

What Factors Affect How Long Opiates Stay in Your System?

Most opiates have short half-lives. Relatively speaking, this means they leave the system quickly.

However, the effects can last for hours.

When answering, “How long do opiates stay in your system?” individual factors play a role.

Some factors that influence how long opiates stay in your system include:

  • Your body weight and mass
  • Your metabolism
  • How much body fat you have
  • Liver and kidney health
  • How you used the drug
  • How often you use opiates
  • Age
  • Drug quality
  • How much water you have in your body

How Long Do Pain Pills Stay in Your System?

Prescription opioids are used to treat moderate-to-severe pain. For years, they were very widely prescribed.

There have been efforts recently to curb how often they’re prescribed because of the opioid epidemic. Prescription pain pills are linked to addiction, dependence, and overdoses. Even if someone takes opioids as prescribed, there’s an abuse or addiction potential.

Hydrocodone is one example of a prescription opioid. If you were to take hydrocodone orally in the form of a pill, it must first pass through the digestive system. It takes longer to feel the effects of opioids used orally. It also takes longer for them to leave your system.

While hydrocodone or oxycodone’s effects might wear off in three or four hours, that doesn’t mean the substance is still not in your system. In some cases, the drug could show up in certain tests anywhere from one to four days.

For example, how long do opiates stay in urine? Opiates can show up in urine tests for up to four days after someone uses them, despite the effects that have long since worn off.

A saliva test may be able to detect prescription pills for up to 48 hours after use.

Hair tests can detect use for up to 90 days.

Blood test detection for prescription pain pills can appear for up to 12 hours after someone takes them.

It is important to note that these are just estimates. Some prescription opiates are longer-lasting and have a longer half-life. Similarly, some are shorter-lasting.

How Long Does Heroin Stay in Your System?

When asking how long opioids stay in your system, you may be curious about heroin as well.

Heroin is typically injected instead of being ingested orally. Heroin has a much shorter half-life than other prescription opioids. The half-life is around 30 minutes. This means if you take a dose of heroin, it will take 30 minutes for your body to flush out half of the drug.

There have been studies showing the half-life could be as short as a few minutes. This can impact how it shows up on a drug test, but more advanced testing systems are being developed with increased sensitivity.

For most people, heroin might not show up in their urine after two days, but some tests will appear positive for up to seven days after heroin is used.

Due to the short half-life, it’s not common for blood or saliva tests to be used to screen for heroin.

How Long Does Fentanyl Stay in Your System?

Fentanyl is one of the most powerful synthetic opioids. The potency makes it incredibly dangerous. Fentanyl is available as a prescription under brand names like Actiq and Duragesic.

It is also sold illegally on the black market. Fentanyl’s potency is estimated to be anywhere from 50 to 100 times that of morphine.

Depending on the type of fentanyl someone uses and how they use it, it can stay in the system or at least be detected for up to four days after use. A blood test might show fentanyl use anywhere from five to 48 hours after the last use. A urine test could show fentanyl for up to three days after it is used.

Treatment for Opiate or Opioid Addiction

Even when someone takes opiates or opioids as prescribed, there is a significant potential for addiction. Your doctor should go over this with you.

You have to be careful to follow the dosage and prescription instructions with opiates or opioids.

These drugs affect your brain by binding to opioid receptor sites. In doing so, they trigger feelings of euphoria. That euphoria, in turn, activates a reward response in your brain. The reward response is what leads to addiction.

If you are addicted to opioids, your use is out of your control. It’s compulsive use that characterizes addiction to any substance.

Addiction treatment is available.

Treatment options for opiate or opioid addiction include:

  • Medical Detox: When you use opioids regularly, you can become dependent on them. If you stop suddenly, withdrawal symptoms may occur. During medical detox, you receive supervision and clinical care while you go through withdrawal.
  • Inpatient Treatment: Inpatient treatment is also known as residential rehab. You live onsite at a treatment facility for weeks or months based on your level of addiction and needs. The environment is safe and supportive. Triggers are eliminated so that you can focus on recovery.
  • Outpatient Treatment: This is a broad term. Outpatient treatment can be intensive and very similar to inpatient treatment, except you spend your nights at home. It can also be therapy or meeting with your counselor once a week.
  • Relapse Prevention: Your relapse prevention plan is what you enact after treatment. Relapse prevention plans might include participating in group or individual therapy. Recovery support groups are also often part of relapse prevention.

If you would like to learn more about opioid addiction treatment, please reach out to North Jersey Recovery Center today.

Our compassionate, clinically-trained team can verify your insurance and answer any questions you may have.

What are the Takeaways?

The question of how long do opiates stay in your system depends on your body and health, the type of opiate, and how you use it.

In general, they can stay in your system anywhere from a few hours to a few days.

Even though you might not feel the effects of an opioid any longer, it can still show up in tests, such as blood or urine tests.

Snorting Cocaine North Jersey Recovery Center - A young woman is snorting cocaine off of a table with a dollar bill.

Snorting Cocaine

What if Someone is Snorting Cocaine?

If you have heard of someone snorting cocaine, you may wonder what the effects of the drug are and what the symptoms may be.

Cocaine is an addictive stimulant drug.

Sniffing cocaine is a common way to use, while also making it more powerful.

Snorting cocaine can also be very risky.

What is Cocaine?

Cocaine is a stimulant drug that comes from coca plant leaves.

Historically, there were medical uses for cocaine, but it is now primarily an illegal substance.

When cocaine is purchased on the streets, it is usually a fine, white powder.

Dealers on the black market may mix it with other substances, such as flour or talcum powder, to make it more profitable.

Other times, cocaine is mixed with more dangerous substances like synthetic opioids.

Street names for cocaine include blow, crack, rock, snow, and coke.

How Does Cocaine Affect the Brain?

When you use cocaine, it floods your brain with artificial levels of dopamine.

Dopamine is a feel-good brain chemical associated with reward and movement.

Cocaine prevents dopamine in the brain from being recycled, which results in large amounts of buildup — changing normal neural communication.

Since the brain’s reward center is flooded with dopamine, it reinforces the behavior of taking the drug.

In the short-term, the effects of snorting cocaine can include:

  • Extreme energy and happiness
  • Talkativeness
  • Mental alertness
  • Loss of appetite
  • Inability to sleep
  • Extreme sensitivity to light and sound
  • Irritability
  • Paranoia

The outcomes of using cocaine can vary significantly between users.

Some people find that cocaine makes them more productive. Other people become violent or unpredictable when using cocaine.

For most, the effects of cocaine are somewhat short-lived.

After snorting cocaine, a person will likely feel the effects almost immediately. These effects will usually last up to an hour.

Other physical effects of cocaine include:

  • Dilated pupils
  • Constricted blood vessels
  • Nausea
  • Raised body temperature
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Irregular or rapid heartbeat
  • Restlessness
  • Tremors
  • Muscle twitches

What is Snorting Cocaine?

Understanding how to snort cocaine can give you an idea of some of the effects of the drug.

Small amounts of cocaine are snorted off something like a key. Larger amounts may be put into lines and snorted through something like a straw.

The cocaine enters the bloodstream through the soft tissues of the nose when you snort it. Along with the other risks of snorting cocaine, there are many other side effects.

Snorting cocaine affects nasal tissues. A common symptom is a chronic runny nose. Someone with a cocaine addiction might blame it on a sinus infection.

Eventually, there can be severe damage to the nasal cavity. Snorting cocaine can erode the tissues in the nose and cause deformities. As nasal damage worsens, it can lead to vision damage, brain infections, and spinal infections.

Along with snorting, some of the other ways people use cocaine include smoking, taking it orally, or injecting it. There are complications specific to each method of use.

If you smoke cocaine, it can cause respiratory distress and greater risks of infections, such as pneumonia and asthma. If you consume it by mouth, it can cause bowel decay.

Injecting cocaine can lead to a higher risk of contracting bloodborne illnesses like hepatitis C and HIV.

Other complications of injecting cocaine include soft tissue infections and scarred veins.

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Signs of Cocaine Addiction

Snorting cocaine can lead to an addiction.

Addiction means that your use of cocaine is no longer in your control. Addiction is a chronic brain disease, often requiring professional treatment.

Signs of cocaine addiction can include:

  • Withdrawal from friends, family, or other loved ones, causing problems in relationships
  • Not meeting obligations at school or work
  • Being unable to stop using cocaine, even if wanting to
  • Continuing to use cocaine, despite adverse effects and outcomes

Unfortunately, it is also common for people with cocaine addictions to use other drugs simultaneously.

For example, cocaine and alcohol addictions are common, as are addictions to cocaine and opioids at the same time. This increases the potential for negative health effects.

Mental Illness and Snorting Cocaine

When someone uses cocaine, they may have an underlying mental illness.

This is common and is called co-occurring disorders or a dual diagnosis. One disorder is the addiction itself, and the other is the mental health condition.

If someone has a co-occurring disorder, they need a treatment program to provide specialized care for both disorders.

Treatment for Someone Addicted to Cocaine

If a person is addicted to cocaine or doesn’t feel like they can stop snorting cocaine, treatment options are available.

Behavioral therapy is used as part of addiction treatment programs. This might include Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) or Motivational Incentives.

Many people receive treatment for cocaine addiction at a rehab center, at least initially. There are multiple phases of cocaine addiction treatment.

You might participate in just one, or all of these, depending on the severity of your addiction and your history of substance use.

  • Detox and Withdrawal: If you have been using cocaine for a period of time, you may go through withdrawal when trying to stop using it. Cocaine withdrawal symptoms can last for days or even weeks. Symptoms may include fatigue, slow thinking or brain fog, depression, paranoia, agitation, and cravings. Supervised detox can get you through cocaine detox and withdrawal and reduce the likelihood of a relapse.
  • Inpatient Treatment: During inpatient rehab, you live onsite at a treatment facility. You receive intensive care and your days revolve around your recovery. The environment is safe and stable, which can be beneficial for the recovery process.
  • Outpatient Treatment: An outpatient program provides more flexibility. You can continue living at home and going to work or taking care of your family as normal. Outpatient rehab may be the right choice for someone with a mild addiction or someone with a strong support system at home.
  • Relapse Prevention: Even after your initial treatment program, you have to maintain your recovery and prevent relapse. Recovery is something you take on for the rest of your life. Your treatment plan should include relapse prevention strategies, such as participation in regular therapy or 12-step support groups.
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How Do You Pay for Addiction Treatment?

If you are addicted to cocaine, you must first realize that recovery is a must.

Cocaine addiction can be deadly. It can lead to a number of ill effects in terms of mental and physical health.

Cocaine addiction can also damage your relationships, your career, and your finances. Once you decide treatment is right for you, contact North Jersey Recovery Center.

Our team will go over payment options with you and verify your insurance.

Many people are surprised when they learn health insurance will cover some or all of the costs of behavioral health care and addiction treatment in many cases.

Takeaways: The Risks of Snorting Cocaine

Cocaine often has a reputation as not being as dangerous as other types of drugs.

That’s simply not the reality. Many people’s lives are destroyed because of snorting coke.

Whether you are concerned for yourself or a loved one, seek treatment sooner rather than later.

Addiction is a challenging illness, but with the right care, it is also one that is treatable.

Reach out to North Jersey Recovery Center to learn more.

Lean (Purple Drank) Addiction and Abuse North Jersey Recovery Center - What is lean? Here is an image of cough syrup that many end up becoming addicted to because they mix many different elements that cause a euphoric feeling.

Lean (Purple Drank) Addiction and Abuse

What is Lean?

If you are unfamiliar with common illicit substance combinations, you may wonder: What is lean? What’s in lean? And why is it so dangerous?

Lean, sometimes known as “purple drank,” combines powerful cough medicines with other easy to find ingredients — like candy or soda.

The cough medicine is also sometimes mixed with alcohol.

Combining cough syrup and candy is a relatively new practice in the world of substance abuse.

With its powerful base of opiate cough medicine, lean can lead to many troubling consequences.

If you are addicted to lean, our rehab programs can help.

Lean as a Drug

Codeine, a powerful opiate, is the lean drug that makes it so dangerous.

Cough medicines containing opiates are potent and powerful.

Lean is made when certain cough medicines are mixed with hard, fruity candies or bubbly soft drinks.

The resulting recreational drug cocktail is addictive and dangerous.

One of the most troubling concerns is the presence of other active ingredients in the prescription cough medicine that may interfere with the codeine.

Other Active Ingredients in Codeine-Based Cough Medicines

Some prescription cough medications that contain codeine also contain antihistamines that act as sedatives.

When abused, taken in high doses, or mixed with other substances, this combination can impair your motor functions.

Other cough syrups may include narcotics that produce feelings of relaxation or high or psychoactive ingredients that alter your mind.

With strong ingredients like these, abuse is incredibly dangerous.

Ingredients that produce such potent effects are often addictive, leading to physical dependence, withdrawal symptoms, and drug cravings.

But your lean addiction is not something that you have to face alone.

Help is right around the corner.

Lean Drink

What is lean?

The buzz around lean drink and the attention it has received from prominent celebrities have only contributed to its dangerousness.

The codeine in lean drinks acts as a cough suppressant and a pain reliever.

This particular pain reliever should be taken under the care, recommendation, and instruction of a medical professional and an individualized prescription.

If you were given a prescription for codeine, it is likely because you have mild to moderate pains that are unresponsive to less potent or non-prescription pain relievers, like Advil.

But prescriptions are abused every day, and many prescription drugs can be purchased or traded illicitly.

And many individuals choose to abuse prescription-strength cough medications.

Side Effects of Abusing Lean

Because the cough medications used to make lean drink contain different opiates, narcotics, and strong antihistamines, this drink can cause a wide variety of unpleasant or dangerous side effects.

Over time, it can impair your mental and physical health.

This illicit concoction is popular among younger demographics, although it is not the most common addiction within this group.

The most common addictions among college students include alcohol, benzodiazepines, marijuana, stimulants, and ecstasy.

Still, many young people have suffered both short and long-term damage to their health after abusing lean.

The side effects that you experience may vary depending on several individual factors.

The amount you drink each time, how often, and the cough medicine you use can alter your side effects.

But some side effects are more common than others.

These include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Sedation
  • Headaches
  • Stomach pain
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Feelings of agitation or confusion
  • Fevers and sweats or shivering
  • Severe muscle stiffness and twitches
  • Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea
  • Coordination problems
  • Rashes, hives, and itching
  • Vision changes
  • Hallucinations
  • Seizures

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The Dangers of Mixing Codeine and Other Substances

Codeine is habit-forming.

It has the potential to lead to life-threatening side effects.

When you mix it with other substances, it becomes increasingly dangerous.

Mixing a potent and addictive opiate with fillers like candy and soda may make it taste better, but it also makes it easier to forget how much you have ingested.

This can lead to dangerous levels of codeine, narcotics, or antihistamines traveling through your system.

These high levels increase your chance of overdosing.

Mixing lean drink ingredients with alcohol takes it to another level.

This can cause respiratory depression, which reduces the amount of oxygen getting to your brain.

Liver damage, coma, and death are linked to respiratory depression.

There is some evidence that certain famous pop culture icons and rappers have suffered impairments due to their lean abuse.

These impairments include hospitalization for seizures, near-death experiences, and arrests.

High-profile athletes have also made the news after they were suspended or hospitalized for their lean abuse.

If you are struggling with lean abuse, do not wait for your addiction, side effects, or cravings to get worse.

Call us today.

Mental Health and Lean Addiction

What is lean, and what does it have to do with mental health?

The ingredients in lean slow your brain activities and create euphoric, relaxed feelings.

Drugs with mind-altering effects of this kind are capable of damaging your mental health.

Abusing lean can lead to brain lesions and memory loss, uncharacteristic changes in your behavior, and other troubling cognitive impairments with long-term use.

Permanent psychosis is also possible.

If you have a pre-existing mental health condition when you start drinking lean, it may become worse.

Dual diagnosis is the term for co-existing mental health disorders and addictions.

The best way to improve your addiction, mental and physical health when you have a dual diagnosis is to treat them simultaneously.

Our dual diagnosis program is comprehensive and highly specialized.

It provides a holistic, well-rounded approach to improving every aspect of your health.

Lean Drink Withdrawal Symptoms

Most codeine-based cough medicines contain multiple ingredients that alter your brain chemistry.

One way it does this is by tricking it into producing more dopamine, the feel-good chemical produced by your brain’s reward system.

Unnatural increases in this chemical can lead to addiction, drug cravings, and a loss of control.

One clear sign of addiction is that you see the damaging toll drugs are taking on your life but cannot stop using the drugs.

Drug cravings can be persistent and overwhelming.

Withdrawal symptoms can lead to relapse if you are not prepared for them.

Codeine withdrawal symptoms can range from nausea, vomiting, and insomnia to agitation, anxiety, and body pains.

Thankfully, an initial part of our addiction treatment programs includes a supervised medical detox.

This type of detox eases your withdrawal symptoms and cravings to set you up for success.

Addiction Treatment Options

We believe each treatment program should be customized according to the individual’s needs.

There are no one-size-fits-all solutions when it comes to addiction care.

We offer various addiction treatment options, from full-time inpatient care to part-time outpatient options to sober living and more.

Each program is uniquely designed to address your addiction, concerns, health, questions, and peace of mind.

From our first phone call to when you feel ready to step back into the real world, we work with you to determine the treatment options that best suit your needs.

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Paying for Addiction Treatments

When it comes to paying for addiction treatments, health insurance is a tremendous resource.

Your health insurance provider may offer full or partial coverage for your addiction treatments.

If you are unsure of what your coverage entails, please call our admissions department.

They will review and verify your insurance for you.

If you do not have insurance, they will also outline alternative payment options for you.

North Jersey Recovery Center

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we specialize in high-level, customized addiction care.

We meet you where you are in your recovery journey and help you get to where you need to be.

We are with you through every step of this process.

Here, you will build all of the resources, tools, knowledge, skills, and support systems you need to pursue a different life.

And you will do so while receiving ongoing care, support, and guidance.

Call us today to get started.

How Long Alcohol is in Your System North Jersey Recovery Center - A man sits at a bar drinking a beer, which leads to alcohol in your system and can cause harmful effects and even lead to addiction if not monitored carefully.

How Long Alcohol is in Your System

How Long are Five Standard Drinks Are Metabolized in?

People often wonder how long it takes to metabolize a standard drink and how fast you detoxify alcohol per hour.

The short answer is that it depends, but there is more to it than that.

What is BAC?

When asking how long alcohol is in your system or how long it takes to metabolize a standard drink, the term BAC is important.

BAC is blood alcohol content. This is the percentage of alcohol in a person’s bloodstream.

If you have a BAC of .10%, your blood contains one part of alcohol for every 1000 parts of blood.

In most states, you are considered legally intoxicated with a BAC of .08% or higher.

Individual factors that can affect BAC include:

  • The number of standard drinks you have
  • The amount of time you consume the drinks within
  • Enzyme levels and production
  • Gender
  • Bodyweight
  • Medications
  • Whether or not you’ve eaten before drinking

How Much is a Standard Drink?

Most of us do not have an accurate idea of how much is in a standard drink.

The following are examples of a standard drink:

  • One 12 oz. beer
  • One 7 oz. malt liquor
  • A 5 oz. glass of wine
  • 1.5 oz shot of hard liquor

For example, if you were to have a 12-ounce margarita, that would not be a standard drink. That would equal anywhere from two to four standard drinks.

Effects of Alcohol at Different BAC Levels

While every person is different, the following are some of the effects that might occur at different BAC levels:

  • At a BAC of .01-.03, your mood could be mildly elevated. There may not be many outward effects.
  • With a BAC of .04-.06, effects can include feelings of warmth and relaxation. Declines in memory and reasoning may occur.
  • From BAC levels of .07-.09, there may be a slight impairment. It is legal in most places to drive at this level.
  • By the time someone’s BAC reaches .10 to .12, there is likely a significant loss of judgment and impairment. Slurred speech may be noticeable.
  • From .13 to .15, there may be major impairment, including blurry vision and problems with motor control.
  • Levels of .16 to .20 may include nausea and a sloppy outward appearance.
  • Levels of .25 to .30 would mean someone is severely intoxicated.

If someone’s BAC were higher than .30, that could mean they would suffer from alcohol poisoning.

Alcohol poisoning is a medical emergency.

When you drink too much too quickly, you can’t break down the alcohol fast enough.

Binge drinking is the most common reason for alcohol poisoning.

Symptoms of alcohol poisoning include vomiting, reduced body temperature, and passing out.

Alcohol poisoning can lead to brain damage or asphyxiation, and it can be deadly.

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How Does Your Body Metabolize Alcohol?

When you drink alcohol, it enters the digestive system.

Alcohol is digested differently than food or other drinks, though.

Around 20% of alcohol from one drink will go straight to the body’s blood vessels. Then, it goes to the brain.

The rest (80%) goes to your small intestine and then to your bloodstream.

Finally, your liver removes the alcohol.

How Long are Five Standard Drinks Metabolized in?

Back to the original question: How long are five standard drinks metabolized in?

Again, it depends.

In general, most people break down half a standard drink every hour.

If you were initially at a BAC of .08, and you did not drink anything else, your BAC would lower at a rate of around 0.015 an hour.

If you took just one small shot of liquor, it would take your body about an hour to metabolize it.

If you had one pint of beer, it would take two hours.

A large glass of wine would take three hours.

For five standard drinks, it would take at least several hours to metabolize.

Urine and Breath Tests

If you wonder how long is alcohol in your system, you may also wonder about detection tests, such as urine and breath tests.

A urine test can typically detect alcohol in your system between 12 and 48 hours after you drink.

Detection on breath tests is a shorter window of time.

A breath test can detect alcohol for around 24 hours.

A breathalyzer can measure your BAC.

If your BAC is above 0.02, it is considered unsafe to drive.

Factors that Affect How Long it Takes to Metabolize a Standard Drink

As we touched on above, there are individual factors that affect the rate your body processes alcohol.

Some of these factors include:

  • Age: The older you are, the longer alcohol remains in your liver before moving to your bloodstream or before it is metabolized. The older you are, the longer you are likely to be intoxicated if you drink.
  • Sex: Men and women metabolize alcohol differently. Alcohol typically stays in a woman’s system longer. This is likely because women have a lower percentage of water in their bodies than men. Women also have a higher body fat percentage. Hormones also impact how your body processes alcohol.
  • Food: If you eat before drinking, it can help dilute alcohol. Having a full stomach can also slow your stomach’s emptying to the small intestine. If you have an empty stomach, your BAC can be as much as three times higher than someone who ate before drinking.
  • Body size: The higher your body fat percentage, the higher your BAC usually is.
  • Medications: Different medications impact how long it takes your body to process alcohol. Some medicines slow down metabolism, which can play a role. Some medicines also slow down the emptying of the stomach to the small intestine and liver. That means alcohol is rapidly absorbed, leading to higher BAC levels.

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Final Thoughts on Alcohol in Your System

In conclusion, it is very much dependent on the individual concerning how long alcohol is in your system.

For most people, it would take a minimum of several hours, but it could be more.

Individual factors play a big role in how your body can detoxify alcohol per hour.

If you are struggling with alcohol use, binge drinking, or feel that you could have a problem, consider an alcohol treatment program.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we offer various types of programs. No matter what program you take part in, it is always customized to your specific needs.

Our staff is caring and compassionate but also skilled in helping people work toward their recovery goals.

We encourage you to contact us to learn more about our program offerings.

Our team can also verify your insurance and determine your coverage.

Alcohol abuse can lead to financial and legal problems and mental and physical health problems.

Take steps to help yourself today.

North Jersey Recovery Center is ready to help today.

How Much Do Drugs Cost: The Steep Price of Addiction North Jersey Recovery Center - An individual is buying drugs off of the street from a drug dealer and realizing how much he is spending on drugs on a daily basis based on a street drug prices chart.

How Much Do Drugs Cost: The Steep Price of Addiction

Street Drug Prices

Street drug prices are a common area of interest in communities where illicit drugs are common.

However, the cost of street drugs is not only financial and does not just impact the individual.

The abuse of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs costs over $740 billion annually.

This number includes costs related to criminal activities, lost work productivity, and addiction-related healthcare.

Drug abusers often face a multitude of costs, whether related to drug-seeking behaviors, crimes, lost wages, or out-of-pocket medical expenses.

But the physical and mental health costs may be the most troubling.

Our comprehensive rehab programs can help you combat these costs.

The Impact of Street Drug Costs

The financial burden for those struggling with drug addiction can be difficult to bear.

To get an idea of this financial burden, you can look at the street drug prices chart for commonly abused drugs.

This is particularly true for young adults who find themselves using drugs to cope with difficult home or family situations.

Recent studies have shown that anywhere from 40% to 70% of homeless youth abuse drugs or alcohol.

This percentage falls between two and three times higher than the rate among non-homeless individuals in the same age range.

For example, cocaine use is four to five times higher among the homeless than the non-homeless.

Similarly, amphetamine use is three to four times higher.

In this same survey, 71% of homeless youth participants met the criteria for substance abuse disorders, whether for alcohol or illicit drugs, or both.

Whether the homelessness or the addiction came first, the connection is there.

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How Much Does Heroin Cost?

Heroin is an illicit substance with no approved medical uses.

Because heroin is not available through prescription or on a drug store shelf, there is no set price or average price for heroin.

However, there are street drug prices charts you can research to give you an idea of the price range for the cost of heroin.

The form, quantity, location, and other factors can alter the cost of this illicit drug.

Heroin tends to be more affordable than many other illicit and prescription drugs.

But this affordability is only one factor of many to consider.

The costs it demands of your physical and mental health are much more significant than the financial costs.

Potent synthetic opioids like heroin and fentanyl are the most lethal category of illicit substances in the United States.

Drug overdoses, fatal and otherwise, occur at alarmingly high rates in this drug category. They outnumber deaths related to firearms, car accidents, suicides, and homicides each year.

But heroin and other synthetic opioids do not have to cost you your life.

We can help you regain control.

The Link Between Heroin and Prescription Opioids

Most heroin addicts did not start with heroin.

About 80% of heroin users report that they had abused prescription opioids first.

These two types of drugs offer many of the same side effects.

But heroin is stronger, more potent, and often more affordable.

When you abuse prescription opioids after receiving them following an injury, childbirth, or a dental procedure, they can quickly lose their effect.

After you have built a tolerance to prescription opioids, you may find yourself graduating to heroin to achieve the effects that have been lost over time with prescription painkillers.

The withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings that come with long-term heroin abuse can be even more difficult to overcome.

You may feel lost, scared, or helpless.

But we can help.

If you are addicted to heroin or prescription opioids, our medical detox eases your withdrawal symptoms and cravings to set you up for success.

Common Street Drugs and Street Drug Prices Chart

Adderall and meth are two common street drugs because they are generally easy to find and affordable.

Many drug abusers take Adderall to increase their focus and concentration.

These side effects make it a popular drug among younger demographics.

It has been nicknamed “the study drug,” but there is no evidence that Adderall use improves test scores or grade point averages.

Heroin, prescription opioids, benzodiazepines, and central nervous system stimulants are high on the list, as well.

Cocaine, hallucinogens, LSD, and marijuana are common among different demographics.

Whichever illicit substances you find yourself abusing, it is important to consider each of the costs, not just the financial ones.

Street drugs are often more dangerous than prescription drugs, but this depends on the individual and several other factors.

Among many others, one reason for this is that street drugs are often mixed with other substances. The drug dealer often does this without the user’s knowledge.

Adding fentanyl to heroin is a common example of this. Combinations like this one instantly increase your risk of overdosing.

Physical and Mental Costs of Abusing Drugs

The costs to your brain, body, career, and relationships are more impactful than the money you will spend to obtain these drugs.

The physical and mental health tolls that they take over time should be your number one priority.

Depending on a wide range of individual factors, like substances abused, the frequency and dose, and your height, weight, and family history, your side effects may range from mild to severe.

You may experience various side effects — from headaches to hand tremors to hallucinations to seizures.

Higher dosages, increased frequencies, polysubstance addictions, and addictions with underlying mental health disorders may each come with more severe side effects.

Many side effects of drug abuse involve worsening or developing mental health disorders.

If you are experiencing adverse side effects, contact your doctor or another medical professional as soon as possible.

If you are interested in seeking professional and high-level care before your side effects become worse, contact our facility.

We walk you through the steps involved in attending a drug rehab program, enforcing early sobriety, overcoming withdrawals, and everything that comes next.

Rehab Treatment Options

Depending on the specifics of your addiction, mental health, and other needs, we work with you to build a program that will best suit your needs.

Your customized care program will be as unique as you are.

These care programs combine proven therapeutic methods with comprehensive techniques for care, support, and guidance that are genuinely patient-focused.

Some of these program options may include:

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Paying for Addiction Treatments

The cost of treatment is a factor that keeps many people in need of professional help from seeking the addiction care they deserve.

But paying for addiction treatment may be easier than you would think.

If you have health insurance, your treatment may be partially or fully covered.

Most major health insurance providers offer coverage for these types of treatments to some degree.

If you are unsure what is covered under your policy, please call our admissions department.

They will review and verify your insurance for you.

If you are coming to us without health insurance, they can also outline alternative payment options.

North Jersey Recovery Center

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we help you work toward lasting sobriety for a healthier and happier life.

Our goal is to provide each person we meet with individualized, high-quality, and comfortable care.

See the difference that a dedicated team and proven therapeutic techniques can make.

You do not have to face your addiction alone. It is time to try things a better way.

Call us today for more information.

The 7 Types of Alcoholics North Jersey Recovery Center - A depressed young male sits on a couch staring at a beer bottle and a glass filled with beer as he contemplates his alcohol use and if he fits into the different types of alcoholics or not.

The 7 Types of Alcoholics

Are There Different Types of Alcoholics?

What are the different types of alcoholics? Are there seven types of alcoholics?

This is a common question, but it’s one that gets misconstrued.

While research has depicted seven types of alcoholics, we will discuss five types of alcoholics based on what we know about addiction at this time.

Understanding the types of alcoholics first relies on having an understanding of alcohol use disorder (AUD).

What is an Alcoholic?

An alcoholic is someone who meets the criteria for alcohol use disorder.

Alcohol use disorder or alcoholism is a pattern of ongoing alcohol abuse.

Characteristics of alcohol use disorder include:

  • Problems controlling your drinking
  • Drinking even when it causes problems
  • Being preoccupied or obsessed with drinking

You can have unhealthy drinking patterns without being an alcoholic.

For example, binge drinking is considered unhealthy drinking, which is especially common among young people.

However, not everyone who binge drinks meets the criteria for alcohol use disorder.

If your drinking causes distress or problems in your daily life, you likely would be diagnosed with an alcohol use disorder.

As with other addictions, alcohol use disorder can range from mild to severe.

What are the Symptoms of Being an Alcoholic?

An alcoholic is diagnosed with an alcohol use disorder based on a specific set of criteria.

This criterion typically includes:

  • Being unable to limit how much you drink
  • Trying and being unsuccessful at cutting down how much you drink
  • Spending much of your time getting alcohol, drinking, or recovering from the effects of alcohol
  • Not meeting obligations because of alcohol
  • Continuing to drink despite problems in relationships, at work, or school
  • Developing a tolerance requiring you to drink more to get the same effects
  • Being dependent on alcohol and having withdrawal symptoms if you don’t drink

Types of Alcoholics

As was mentioned above, some people believe there are seven types of alcoholics.

In reality, there are likely closer to five types.

These are also called subtypes of alcoholics.

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Young Adult Subtype

Among the types of alcoholics, the young adult subtype is the most common.

This type of alcoholic refers to people between the ages of 18 and 25.

Within this group, the average age at which someone develops an alcohol addiction is 20 years old.

Someone in a young adult subtype might drink less than other types of alcoholics.

However, they will often binge drink when they do.

Someone who is a young adult subtype alcoholic might have an average of 14 drinks a day when they drink.

This group, among other types of alcoholics, is the least likely to get help.

The reduced number of people seeking treatment in this group is because it is usually seen as normal.

When you’re a young adult, partying and drinking may seem like something everyone is doing at that age.

Young Antisocial Subtype

Another type of alcoholic is known as the young antisocial subtype.

These are people who are young adults and may have antisocial personality disorders.

There may be other mental health issues that occur along with a personality disorder.

People who fall into the young antisocial subtype group tend to behave recklessly, increasing the likelihood of developing an alcohol use disorder.

Functional Subtype

Functional alcoholics is another subtype of alcoholics that many people have heard of or are familiar with.

Functional alcoholics don’t always appear to have an alcohol use disorder.

This type of alcoholism generally appears during middle age.

Someone who is a functional alcoholic will often live a completely normal life and can even be very successful.

However, they might drink excessively in the evenings — often as a way to relax.

Some of the issues of functional alcoholism include that it can cause physical health problems.

Problematic patterns of drinking can also be troublesome in terms of relationships.

It is challenging for functional alcoholics to realize there is a problem.

This makes them less likely to seek treatment.

Intermediate Familial Subtype

Someone with a family history of alcoholism may have an intermediate family subtype.

This can stem from different scenarios depending on the specific circumstances.

If someone is raised in an environment of heavy drinking, they may begin to replicate the same patterns.

There may also be a genetic component.

We know that one of the underlying risk factors for alcoholism is genetics.

People in the intermediate familial subtype often have co-occurring mental health problems, such as clinical depression or bipolar disorder.

These mental health conditions have a genetic component as well.

Chronic Severe Subtype

In most cases, chronic severe subtype is the most damaging subtype compared to the different types of alcoholics.

Someone who is in the chronic severe subtype will often drink excessively daily.

Someone who falls under this type of alcoholic is likely to have many physical and lifestyle factors destroyed as a result. Unfortunately, they continue to drink.

Physical dependence is prominent in the severe chronic subtype.

This means that if someone tries to change their drinking patterns, they will likely experience intense withdrawal symptoms.

Around 80% of people in the severe chronic subtype have a familial and genetic alcoholism link.

Someone in this category is also more likely to abuse other drugs too.

If you are concerned about your drinking patterns or someone else’s drinking habits, the below questions are ones you may want to ask yourself or your loved one to determine if there is a problem or not.

  • Do you have a problem stopping drinking once you start?
  • Do you lose control when you start drinking?
  • Do you want to stop drinking but find that you aren’t able to?
  • Do you have cravings for alcohol?
  • Do you keep using alcohol even though it’s causing problems in relationships?
  • Do you ever give up activities to drink instead?
  • Do you drink when it’s risky to do so?
  • Do you need alcohol to feel “normal?”

Help for Different Types of Alcoholics?

If you recognize the signs or symptoms of alcoholism either in yourself or someone you care about, treatment options are available.

The type of treatment you may benefit most from can depend on the category you fall into.

For example, if you’re a functional alcoholic, outpatient treatment may work well for you. This would allow you to continue living and working as normal but receive treatment at the same time.

For someone who is a chronic severe alcoholic, treatment would likely need to be much more intensive.

Treatment might include a supervised medical detox to deal with dangerous withdrawal symptoms.

Then, someone who is a chronic severe alcoholic might start an inpatient program.

Following inpatient treatment, they could live in a sober living house and begin their relapse prevention plan.

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Paying for Treatment

If someone is an alcoholic, they should seek treatment sooner rather than later.

Alcoholism of any kind is a progressing, chronic illness.

This means the longer it goes untreated, the worse the symptoms and outcomes will likely be.

If you are looking for treatment programs, contact North Jersey Recovery Center.

Our program options range from intensive residential treatment to outpatient care.

Our team can verify your insurance coverage to help determine the costs of addiction treatment.

Final Takeaways

There are five different types of alcoholics.

Understanding what these are can help you better identify a problem, whether in yourself or in someone you love.

When you know what type of alcoholic you are, you can also identify what treatment programs could be best.

Is Alcohol a Depressant? North Jersey Recovery Center - A group of individuals attending an inpatient alcohol rehab for alcoholism is engaging in a group therapy session and discussing topics, such as: "Is alcohol a depressant?" as well as other helpful tools and resources to support each other as they continue on their journeys to recovery.

Is Alcohol a Depressant?

Is Alcohol a Stimulant or Depressant?

A pressing question for those trying to understand their alcohol addiction may be: “Is alcohol a depressant?” The answer is yes.

Alcohol is a central nervous system depressant, and it often accomplishes the opposite of what it is meant to. While many people drink to improve their mood, alcohol can worsen it.

Alcohol harms your mental and physical health. It can alter moods, behaviors, and overall functioning.

At the moment, it may help you relax.

However, its side effects and the inevitable hangover increase your anxieties later.

If you are battling alcoholism, our comprehensive addiction programs will help break the cycle.

Why is Alcohol a Depressant?

Alcohol can be hard to categorize because it mimics the effects of both stimulant and depressant drugs.

This tends to lead to some confusion. Alcohol is a tricky substance.

To a certain extent, it may boost your energy levels or moods. On these occasions, it feels as if alcohol is a stimulant.

However, clarity comes with the crash. At this point, it becomes clear why alcohol is a depressant; it slows down your brain’s ability to function and its neurological activities. This occurs because it enhances the effect of a particular neurotransmitter in your brain.

Alcohol also alters your reactions to certain events. When you are under the influence, you may feel slow to respond.

Side effects, like slurring your speech, experiencing unsteadiness in your movements, anger, confusion, and slowed reaction times, are all common.

Alcohol impairs your mental health, too. Alcohol distorts your judgment and makes it challenging to think rationally. Its diminishment of your judgment and ability to think clearly make it easier to make poor choices. These poor choices often lead to accidents, bouts of violence, driving under the influence, and criminal activities.

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Alcoholism in America

Another common question for those battling alcohol addictions is whether or not they are alone. If you are wondering the same thing, the answer is no; you are not alone. Alcohol use disorders are some of the most common substance abuse disorders we see today.

Nearly 18 million American adults have a reported alcohol use disorder. But even still, this may not reflect the full picture.

Many alcohol addictions go untreated, undiagnosed, or unacknowledged. Alcohol use disorders affect a multitude of individuals, families, and communities.

The normalization and ease of access to alcohol are two factors that make it easy to abuse and easy to hide.

What is the Best Way to Address Alcoholism?

Whether as a celebration or a way to ease stress, most American adults drink alcohol. But pretending the problem does not exist will not make the problem better or disappear on its own. Pretending you are fine because you know others who drink as much as you do will not make your addiction easier to overcome.

The best way to understand, address, and overcome your addiction is to accept the help offered and available to you.

Our dedicated professionals will provide care, support, and guidance at each stage of your journey. It is time to change your life for the better.

Where Did My Alcohol Use Disorder Come From?

Addiction is a chronic disease.

It alters your brain’s chemistry and changes our thoughts and behaviors. The idea that addiction equates to a lack of willpower is a false and damaging one.

Many people have a genetic predisposition to becoming an alcoholic, as alcoholism tends to run in families. It has impacted the lives of millions of families over the years. Growing up in a household that normalizes alcohol abuse makes it even harder to avoid.

Other common contributors to alcoholism rates in America include social and environmental challenges. Stressful careers or relationships, underlying mental health disorders, and trauma are also often linked to alcoholism.

Whether alcoholism runs in your family or other factors have contributed to your addiction, we can help.

A big piece of addiction treatment is understanding why your addiction occurred in the first place. By identifying your concerns, triggers, and temptations, you can effectively address them.

You can choose healthy habits, social networks, and coping mechanisms instead.

Alcoholism and Mental Health

After genetics, mental health disorders are some of the most common causes of alcohol use disorders.

What makes this even more tricky is that alcoholism does not always come first. You may begin drinking to cope with symptoms of a diagnosed or undiagnosed mental health disorder, or your drinking may lead to a mental health disorder.

In either order, this combination can lead to short-term and long-term mental and physical health impairments.

The combination of a mental health disorder and substance abuse disorder is called a dual diagnosis. We offer a specialized program to address this type of disorder.

Some of the most common dual diagnosis combinations include substance abuse and:

  • Generalized anxiety disorders
  • Panic disorders
  • Post-traumatic stress disorders
  • Depression
  • Bipolar disorders
  • Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorders
  • Psychotic illnesses
  • Borderline personality disorders
  • Antisocial personality disorders
  • Schizophrenia

There are many different possible dual diagnosis combinations.

Whether your mental illness is diagnosed or unconfirmed, we can help. We will see you through from our first phone call to our addiction aftercare services.

Alcohol Addiction Treatments

Many alcohol addiction programs begin with a medically assisted detox. This type of detox will ease your withdrawal symptoms and cravings to make the process easier. Free from temptations and distractions, you will have a safe place to focus on building a happy, healthy, and sober life. This detox will restore your strength and confidence, setting you up for success.

From there, we offer various proven treatment programs and methods. We customize each program based on your needs rather than offering cookie-cutter or unspecific pre-written programs.

We evaluate your addiction with you to ensure we choose the right care settings and methods.

Whether you choose the 24-hour inpatient setting, the flexible outpatient care, or a supplemental program, you will have access to the resources, tools, care, and support you need.

We also help with multiple or polysubstance addictions, underlying mental health disorders, and other complications.

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Paying for Alcohol Rehab

In recent years, it has become easier to find affordable and flexible addiction treatments. Part of this is due to changes in health insurance coverage laws.

Most major health insurance providers now offer coverage for addiction treatments.

You may have partial or full coverage for your alcohol rehab program.

If you are unsure of what your coverage entails, please call our admissions department.

They will review and verify your insurance for you. They will also outline alternative payment options if you do not have insurance.

North Jersey Recovery Center

Your alcoholism can only define you if you allow it to.

If you are ready to take back the reins and regain control of your life, we are ready to help you get there.

We will walk the path to recovery with you.

We will be there every step of the way.

Through proven care methods, individualized treatment programs, and various continued care options, we help you identify and achieve your goals.

Call us today for more information.

How Long Do Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System? North Jersey Recovery Center - A man is sitting in bed taking another dose of his benzodiazepines to achieve the effect he first had when he initially took the medication for his anxiety.

How Long Do Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

Benzodiazepines & How Long They Stay in Your System

Many individuals want to know: “How long do benzodiazepines stay in your system?”

You might want to know so that you can avoid taking another dose too soon and overdosing.

If you take other medications, you might also want to avoid combining it with a benzodiazepine.

Some people wonder how long these drugs stay in your system for a drug test.

While it depends on many factors, benzodiazepines are typically detectible in your body for days or even weeks, depending on the test type.

That doesn’t mean the drugs are active, and you continue to feel the effects.

It just means a drug test could show benzodiazepines.

What are Benzodiazepines?

First, what are benzodiazepines?

This is a class of drugs available by prescription in the United States.

Common benzodiazepines include Xanax (alprazolam) and Valium (diazepam).

Other benzodiazepines include:

  • Libirum (chloridiazepoxide)
  • Estazolam
  • Restoril (temazepam)

These medications are usually prescribed for the short-term treatment of anxiety, panic disorders, and, in some cases, insomnia.

How Do Benzodiazepines Work?

When someone takes a benzodiazepine, it affects their brain chemicals and creates a calming, relaxing effect.

This is due to the effects of benzodiazepines on GABA. GABA is a neurotransmitter that calms brain activity.

By increasing the effects of GABA, benzodiazepines can reduce anxiety.

Side effects of benzodiazepines can include:

  • Confusion
  • Depression
  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness
  • Impaired coordination
  • Vision problems
  • Headaches

The long-term use of benzodiazepines can lead to dependence and addiction. It’s also possible to overdose on benzodiazepines.

Benzodiazepine overdose is more common when these drugs are combined with other substances that slow the central nervous system — like opioids.

As such, it’s important to avoid combining any potentially dangerous medications with a benzodiazepine.

If you are prescribed one of these medicines, remember the following:

  • Follow the dosage your doctor prescribes, and take your medicine on schedule.
  • Ask your doctor what to do if you miss a dose to ensure you do not take a dose too close to another.
  • Go over any additional medications, vitamins, or supplements you take with your doctor.

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What Effects How Long Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

How long do benzodiazepines stay in your system?

First, it depends on the specific drug you are taking. There are short-, medium- and long-acting benzodiazepines.

Xanax is a longer-acting benzodiazepine. If you were to take Xanax, peak levels would occur in your blood around one to two hours after.

The half-life of Xanax in the blood is just over 11 hours in most healthy adults. Half-life means half the drug taken has been eliminated in your urine at that time.

It takes around five half-lives for your body to clear 98% of a drug.

That would mean it could take anywhere from two to four days for a dose of Xanax to be entirely eliminated from your body. However, that doesn’t mean that it wouldn’t show up in a drug test earlier.

How long do benzos stay in your urine?

For a short-acting benzodiazepine, it could show up in a urine test for up to four days. It can show up in a blood test for up to 24 hours and in saliva for up to two and a half days.

A longer-acting benzodiazepine could show up in a drug test even longer.

Common shorter-acting benzodiazepines include:

  • Estazolam
  • Flurazepam
  • Triazolam
  • Midazolam
  • Temazepam

Common longer-acting benzodiazepines include:

  • Alprazolam
  • Clorazepate
  • Diazepam
  • Halazepam
  • Lorazepam
  • Oxazepam
  • Prazepam
  • Quazepam
  • Clonazepam

Additional Effects That Contribute to How Long Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System

Along with the drug itself, there are individual factors that play a role in how long benzodiazepines stay in your system.

Some of these common factors include:

  • Age: Typically, the younger you are, the healthier you are. You are also less likely to be on multiple medications. This can mean that your body may eliminate benzodiazepines faster than someone older. While the average half-life for Xanax is around 11 hours in healthy, young adults, it can go up to 16 hours in seniors.
  • Alcohol: If you combine Xanax with alcohol, it can lead to fatal consequences. It can also take longer for the Xanax to leave your system.
  • Ethnicity: Some ethnic backgrounds have demonstrated longer elimination times for drugs. For example, people of Asian descent have half-lives from 15% to 25% longer than Caucasians.
  • Organ Problems: Organs, especially the liver, play an important role in eliminating substances like benzodiazepines. If you have a condition such as chronic liver disease, it’s harder for your body to break down and eliminate certain substances.
  • Weight: If you’re overweight or have a higher percentage of body fat, it’s harder for your body to break down substances, including benzodiazepines, leading to a longer half-life.
  • Metabolism: If you have a higher metabolism or are physically active, you may see that benzodiazepines stay in your system for a shorter time period.
  • Frequency and Duration of Usage: If you frequently use benzodiazepines, your body can take longer to eliminate the substances in your system.

Getting Help for Benzodiazepine Addiction

If you are struggling with benzodiazepine addiction, you aren’t alone.

There are treatment programs available. Medical detox can be a good starting point due to the potential severity of benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms.

During medical detox, your symptoms can be safely managed in a controlled environment. Following medical detox, you might begin an inpatient or outpatient treatment program.

Determining the type of program that is best for you depends on the severity of your addiction and any other addictions to other substances.

If you have a co-occurring mental health disorder, you might need a more intensive treatment program, such as inpatient rehab.

There are hybrid programs available at North Jersey Recovery Center, like the Partial-Care Program.

There are intensive outpatient treatment programs that take place most of the day and throughout the week. However, in the evenings, you can return home.

No matter what treatment program you enroll in, you will have a team of compassionate and trained professionals who create personalized treatment plans for you and your needs.

Following treatment, you should have plans for relapse prevention during your recovery.

This might include having a recovery coach or participating in 12-step programs regularly.

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Summing Up: How Long do Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

“How long does 1 benzodiazepine stay in your system?”

Consider the following:

  • You can expect a half-life of five hours or less for ultra short-acting benzodiazepines.
  • Short- and intermediate benzodiazepines have a half-life ranging from 5 to 24 hours.
  • Long-acting benzodiazepines have half-lives that are 24 hours or more.

To learn more about caring and effective addiction treatment programs, call North Jersey Recovery Center today.

We will answer any questions you may have and provide you with information about program options.

We can also verify your insurance coverage and work with you each step of the way for admissions and during treatment and recovery.