How Long Do Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System? North Jersey Recovery Center - A man is sitting in bed taking another dose of his benzodiazepines to achieve the effect he first had when he initially took the medication for his anxiety.

How Long Do Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

Benzodiazepines & How Long They Stay in Your System

Many individuals want to know: “How long do benzodiazepines stay in your system?”

You might want to know so that you can avoid taking another dose too soon and overdosing.

If you take other medications, you might also want to avoid combining it with a benzodiazepine.

Some people wonder how long these drugs stay in your system for a drug test.

While it depends on many factors, benzodiazepines are typically detectible in your body for days or even weeks, depending on the test type.

That doesn’t mean the drugs are active, and you continue to feel the effects.

It just means a drug test could show benzodiazepines.

What are Benzodiazepines?

First, what are benzodiazepines?

This is a class of drugs available by prescription in the United States.

Common benzodiazepines include Xanax (alprazolam) and Valium (diazepam).

Other benzodiazepines include:

  • Libirum (chloridiazepoxide)
  • Estazolam
  • Restoril (temazepam)

These medications are usually prescribed for the short-term treatment of anxiety, panic disorders, and, in some cases, insomnia.

How Do Benzodiazepines Work?

When someone takes a benzodiazepine, it affects their brain chemicals and creates a calming, relaxing effect.

This is due to the effects of benzodiazepines on GABA. GABA is a neurotransmitter that calms brain activity.

By increasing the effects of GABA, benzodiazepines can reduce anxiety.

Side effects of benzodiazepines can include:

  • Confusion
  • Depression
  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness
  • Impaired coordination
  • Vision problems
  • Headaches

The long-term use of benzodiazepines can lead to dependence and addiction. It’s also possible to overdose on benzodiazepines.

Benzodiazepine overdose is more common when these drugs are combined with other substances that slow the central nervous system — like opioids.

As such, it’s important to avoid combining any potentially dangerous medications with a benzodiazepine.

If you are prescribed one of these medicines, remember the following:

  • Follow the dosage your doctor prescribes, and take your medicine on schedule.
  • Ask your doctor what to do if you miss a dose to ensure you do not take a dose too close to another.
  • Go over any additional medications, vitamins, or supplements you take with your doctor.

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What Effects How Long Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

How long do benzodiazepines stay in your system?

First, it depends on the specific drug you are taking. There are short-, medium- and long-acting benzodiazepines.

Xanax is a longer-acting benzodiazepine. If you were to take Xanax, peak levels would occur in your blood around one to two hours after.

The half-life of Xanax in the blood is just over 11 hours in most healthy adults. Half-life means half the drug taken has been eliminated in your urine at that time.

It takes around five half-lives for your body to clear 98% of a drug.

That would mean it could take anywhere from two to four days for a dose of Xanax to be entirely eliminated from your body. However, that doesn’t mean that it wouldn’t show up in a drug test earlier.

How long do benzos stay in your urine?

For a short-acting benzodiazepine, it could show up in a urine test for up to four days. It can show up in a blood test for up to 24 hours and in saliva for up to two and a half days.

A longer-acting benzodiazepine could show up in a drug test even longer.

Common shorter-acting benzodiazepines include:

  • Estazolam
  • Flurazepam
  • Triazolam
  • Midazolam
  • Temazepam

Common longer-acting benzodiazepines include:

  • Alprazolam
  • Clorazepate
  • Diazepam
  • Halazepam
  • Lorazepam
  • Oxazepam
  • Prazepam
  • Quazepam
  • Clonazepam

Additional Effects That Contribute to How Long Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System

Along with the drug itself, there are individual factors that play a role in how long benzodiazepines stay in your system.

Some of these common factors include:

  • Age: Typically, the younger you are, the healthier you are. You are also less likely to be on multiple medications. This can mean that your body may eliminate benzodiazepines faster than someone older. While the average half-life for Xanax is around 11 hours in healthy, young adults, it can go up to 16 hours in seniors.
  • Alcohol: If you combine Xanax with alcohol, it can lead to fatal consequences. It can also take longer for the Xanax to leave your system.
  • Ethnicity: Some ethnic backgrounds have demonstrated longer elimination times for drugs. For example, people of Asian descent have half-lives from 15% to 25% longer than Caucasians.
  • Organ Problems: Organs, especially the liver, play an important role in eliminating substances like benzodiazepines. If you have a condition such as chronic liver disease, it’s harder for your body to break down and eliminate certain substances.
  • Weight: If you’re overweight or have a higher percentage of body fat, it’s harder for your body to break down substances, including benzodiazepines, leading to a longer half-life.
  • Metabolism: If you have a higher metabolism or are physically active, you may see that benzodiazepines stay in your system for a shorter time period.
  • Frequency and Duration of Usage: If you frequently use benzodiazepines, your body can take longer to eliminate the substances in your system.

Getting Help for Benzodiazepine Addiction

If you are struggling with benzodiazepine addiction, you aren’t alone.

There are treatment programs available. Medical detox can be a good starting point due to the potential severity of benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms.

During medical detox, your symptoms can be safely managed in a controlled environment. Following medical detox, you might begin an inpatient or outpatient treatment program.

Determining the type of program that is best for you depends on the severity of your addiction and any other addictions to other substances.

If you have a co-occurring mental health disorder, you might need a more intensive treatment program, such as inpatient rehab.

There are hybrid programs available at North Jersey Recovery Center, like the Partial-Care Program.

There are intensive outpatient treatment programs that take place most of the day and throughout the week. However, in the evenings, you can return home.

No matter what treatment program you enroll in, you will have a team of compassionate and trained professionals who create personalized treatment plans for you and your needs.

Following treatment, you should have plans for relapse prevention during your recovery.

This might include having a recovery coach or participating in 12-step programs regularly.

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Summing Up: How Long do Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

“How long does 1 benzodiazepine stay in your system?”

Consider the following:

  • You can expect a half-life of five hours or less for ultra short-acting benzodiazepines.
  • Short- and intermediate benzodiazepines have a half-life ranging from 5 to 24 hours.
  • Long-acting benzodiazepines have half-lives that are 24 hours or more.

To learn more about caring and effective addiction treatment programs, call North Jersey Recovery Center today.

We will answer any questions you may have and provide you with information about program options.

We can also verify your insurance coverage and work with you each step of the way for admissions and during treatment and recovery.

Social Media and Drug Use North Jersey Recovery Center - A woman is centered in on her phone, checking all of her social media accounts, which can lead to negative effects for those struggling with addiction when it comes to how the media influences drug use

Social Media & Drug Use

How Does the Media Influence Drug Use?

While there are sober influencers all over social media outlets such as Instagram, social media and drug use are still glorified.

With subtle but suggestive posts of peers taking shots of alcohol or smoking a joint together, we are constantly bombarded with drug use, whether we realize it.

If you look for it, many media influencers promote sobriety and a healthy lifestyle.

If you want to be an influence for change, let North Jersey Recovery Center help you rediscover a healthier you.

How Does Social Media Glamorize Drugs and Alcohol?

How does the media influence drug use? Famous influencers, such as rappers Wiz Khalifa and Snoop Dogg, consistently glorify smoking marijuana.

Rapper Devin the Dude often posts illicit drugs on his Instagram as well.

We are impressionable as a community, and if we see Snoop Dogg light one up, we figure — why not us too?

If you find yourself using because “everyone else is,” North Jersey Recovery Center helps you understand the risks of this behavior.

Understanding Social Media and Drug Use

If you remember the DARE Campaign of the ’90s, it was a laughable attempt to scare kids from drug use.

The anti-drug campaign came across anecdotal and exaggerated, causing them to be easily dismissed.

For drug abuse to be taken seriously, social media influence needs to be credible and honest.

With shows like Drunk History glamorizing alcohol abuse and targeted Instagram advertising for vaping products, it’s hard to look away.

The tobacco and alcohol industries have widely used social media platforms to integrate marketing strategies accessible to the most vulnerable population.

North Jersey Recovery Center’s continual support programs can help you utilize social media as an influence to find community.

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Effects of Social Media and Drug Use

In a recent study, researchers found that people with multiple drug users in their social network abused drugs.

This study proves just how detrimental social and social media substance glorification can be to your physical well-being.

There are increasing behavioral consequences, such as mimicking behavior seen on platforms like Instagram, Tik-Tok, and Twitter.

These social media platforms market themselves as fun, safe places to connect with peers and family.

The dark reality is that these negative influences could be fueling your addiction.

Instagram images are perfectly photographed to sweep the grim reality of dependency under the rug.

How Does the Media Contribute to Substance Abuse?

The media is connecting users in a very troubling way.

Studies show that young adults communicate substance use related messages via popular social media platforms.

Social media and drug use are now not only a negative influence but a means to talk about using addictive drugs.

Substance abuse is glorified by celebrities and others on social media, opening doors for marketing strategies that promote substance use.

Media also allows access to “the dark web” that takes dealing and buying drugs to a new platform — the internet. At North Jersey Recovery Center, our therapists modify addictive behaviors and thought patterns to make you impervious to the impacts of harmful influences.

How Does the Media Influence Drug Use?

Social media influences us, whether it is your mother sharing political ads or a pre-teen looking for Tik-Tok followers.

With social media and drug use statistics on the rise, addiction is becoming a community concern.

Exposure to substance abuse imagery is strongly associated with substance abuse and addictive behavior.

Often, you may see your peers engaging in drug and alcohol use and feel you have to do the same to be seen as “cool” in the eyes of your peers.

If you think that social media use affects addictive behavior, we can assess this area during our initial evaluation.

Our team of nationally accredited professionals is dedicated to analyzing every aspect of your addiction to optimal recovery.

Seeking Treatment for Drug and Alcohol Abuse

If you feel you have lost your battle to drug and alcohol addiction, we can help you rediscover a sober lifestyle.

Depending on your physical dependence, we may recommend you complete medically assisted treatment in getting you through critical withdrawal symptoms.

We know this can be a scary step, and we have a team of professionals who can tell you what to expect.

We will be behind you every step of the way, providing guidance and emotional support.

If your schedule does not allow inpatient care, intensive outpatient programs offer you continual support from the convenience of home.

Our partial hospitalization program assures you of the support of continued therapies while transitioning back into your routine.

Treatment Methodologies

North Jersey Recovery Center addresses your emotional health for a complete and successful recovery.

Professional therapists provide counseling and coping techniques to assist you in your process of rehabilitation.

Cognitive-behavioral therapy and eye movement desensitization and reprocessing are innovative treatments that we use to approach addiction’s underlying causes.

We also offer dialectical behavioral therapy for clients that suffer symptoms from drug or alcohol abuse and mental health disorders.

Art therapy is a fun and healing way to manage stress and get in touch with your creative side.

Our professionals are passionate about seeing you succeed in your journey to rediscovering health.

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Find Peace of Mind at Our Facilities

We know that it can be challenging to leave your safety zone, so we provide only the best accommodations.

Your commitment to change is our goal by providing luxury and executive facilities.

We offer 100% anonymity for all of our patients as we understand the sensitive nature of investing in rehabilitation.

Amenities like group exercise, golf, tennis, and basketball courts provide a much-needed dopamine boost during recovery.

Outdoor meditation spaces, healthy meals, massage treatments, and open floor plans offer our guests much-needed relaxation.

Free Insurance Verification

We offer the convenience of paying online through your insurance, and we also accept cash payment methods.

North Jersey Recovery Center provides free insurance verification to establish your benefits as well.

Medicare, Medicaid, private insurance, state-financed health insurance, and military insurance are accepted, providers.

We will negotiate the best treatment plan with your insurance, so you don’t have to.

Our team will confirm the extent of coverage benefits and provide the best treatment options.

Supplying the best level of care without sacrificing quality is one of our top priorities.

Kiss the Influence of Social Media and Drug Use Goodbye

While we cannot regulate what is available on social media, we can control our exposure to it and how it influences our decisions.

While social media can be a fun diversion, it can also be a means to feed our addictions and negative behavior.

You could be an inspiration to others struggling with addiction by sharing the advantages of sobriety on social media platforms.

Social media and drug abuse influence do not have to be the only authority on the internet.

We want to equip you with the tools to avoid drug and alcohol abuse pressures, no matter what you see online.

Let our professionals help you lead a clean and sober life by giving us a call today at 877-786-0572.

Demi Lovato’s Relapse

The Harrowing Story of What Addiction Does, and How You Can Overcome It

Addiction touches the lives of billions around the world.

Many of us suffer quietly with drugs and do not admit it because of the stigma surrounding addiction.

We do not want to be labeled “junky,” “addict,” or “dopehead.”

We fear judgment from others as being weak and lacking self-control.

Demi Lovato’s admission of addiction broke the barrier that holds so many of us, prisoners, to our addiction.

We fear what others will say or think.

Drug addiction is real, and it devours those from all walks of life, including pop stars.

You are not alone.

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Does Our Past Cause Addiction?

Demi Lovato was robbed of a normal childhood because of her father’s own struggle with addiction to drugs and alcohol.

She remembers his drunken rages and violent outbursts.

Now 25-year-old Demi recalls being a depressed child often consumed with thoughts of death.

She often played out a scenario in her mind of what her funeral would be like.

At the age of 5, Demi began modeling and competing in beauty pageants.

She dove headfirst into acting and singing when she appeared on “Barney and Friends.”

Her school years were jaded by the taunting and bullying she endured.

Demi was called all kinds of names, and one that impacted her life was being labeled “fat.”

She made a vision board with pasted cutouts of slim celebrities she wanted to be like.

As a result of being called fat, Demi developed bulimia—frequently binging on food and purging it afterward.

She was later recruited by Disney Channel, where she starred on “As the Bell Rings” and “Camp Rock.”

At the age of 15, Demi began touring with the Jonas Brothers.

The lifestyle of acting while singing on the road became immensely overwhelming.

She was under immense stress to maintain a squeaky-clean life while being flexible enough to become a pop singer.

The stress Demi was under, coupled with her eating disorder and her father’s addiction, weighed heavily on her.

All while suffering from depression, things started to unravel.

At the age of 17, Demi had her first hit of cocaine. Her first time trying it was scary, but she began to love how it made her feel.

She began drinking alcohol and doing more cocaine.

As the stress of touring and acting increased, she started taking Adderall to help her keep up.

With drugs, alcohol, depression, and bulimia combined, she was at an explosive point in her life.

She was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, which helped explained the highs and lows she was experiencing.

Those around her noticed a change in her personality, such as her angry outbursts.

Demi Lovato’s addiction was so bad that she admitted to carrying bags of drugs around because she craved them.

Her manager got her help, but she managed to fake drug tests and find ways to keep using.

She can remember a day when she had used cocaine, Xanax, and alcohol and was unsure if she would overdose.

Demi Lovato’s rehab kept her sober for six years.

While sober, she found that she was still just as miserable as she was when she used drugs.

The team of people managing her controlled everything from what she ate to what she would wear.

She became overwhelmed and relapsed by drinking alcohol.

Later that night, she went out with friends and used drugs.

It was three months after her relapse that she overdosed and ended up in the hospital.

Demi had a sudden realization that she needed help.

She went back into rehab and has since lived a clean life that she is proud of.

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Demi Lovato’s Addiction and Mental Disorders

Demi Lovato’s addiction intensified her bulimia, bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety, and suicidal tendencies.

Likewise, her existing mental disorders fueled her abuse of drugs. 

She was caught in a vicious cycle that led to her addiction.

Drug Abuse Leads to Addiction

Flirting with drugs often opens the door to addiction.

All it takes is one time to get you hooked. Demi Lovato’s drug addiction is an example of this.

Demi’s addiction to cocaine happened the moment she “just tried” it.

She liked the way it made her feel. 

When we are swimming in emotional pain, we want to feel better.

When drugs provide that outlet, guess what? We take it.

How does Demi Lovato’s addiction mirror our own?

The moment we “try” drugs, we begin a downward spiral just like Demi did. 

Do you want to continue down that road the Demi Lovato was on, or do you want to be like her and grab your life back?

Get Help!

Take the first step and admit you have a problem.

Do not let the stigma of drug addiction stand in the way of you regaining control of your life.

Demi Lovato’s drug addiction story shows us just how dangerous drug abuse is.

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How do you get treatment?

  1. Admit you need help.
  2. Call a professional because once you become dependent on drugs because you cannot tackle it alone. When you attempt to go the DIY route with treatment, you set yourself up for relapse.
  3. You will go through an intake process and a health screening.
  4. Instructions will be provided to you on which facility to go to.
  5. You will meet with therapists, counselors, and medical specialists who develop a tailored treatment plan.
  6. As an inpatient, you will go through detox to clean your body of all substances. This is done either through social methods or medically.
  7. Once you are stable, you will go to our “partial hospitalization” program, where you will continue treatment as a resident while easing back into your everyday life. The next step in the program is “outpatient.”
  8. As an outpatient, you will attend scheduled visits for treatment. If you need to schedule those visits around your busy life, we understand. We offer intensive outpatient therapy for such occasions.


Payment and Insurance

 
Our staff is more than happy to verify your insurance on your behalf to make things easier for you.

You also have the option to use our online verification form to do it yourself.
 

A Clean Life is a Great Life

We hope that sharing Demi Lovato’s addiction story with you is convincing enough to encourage you to get help.

Do what is best for you, regardless of what others might say about addiction.

Do not let them have control over the opportunity to live a clean and fabulous life!

Contact us at North Jersey Recovery Center today.

Is Alcohol a Drug North Jersey Recovery Center - A woman is struggling with her dependence on alcohol because is alcohol a drug? She is debating seeking treatment for her alcohol addiction

Is Alcohol a Drug?

Understanding Alcoholism and Where to Turn for Help

 
Many of us look forward to a few beers after work or a glass of wine while cooking dinner.

If we were to log how much alcohol we consume every week, we might notice a pattern that repeats itself.

Is it possible we are addicted to alcohol?

Is alcohol a drug?

It turns out that alcohol is a drug because it falls within the class of depressants.

You CAN become addicted to alcohol, which is referred to as “alcoholism.”


What is Alcohol?

 
Alcohol is a drink that is produced through fermentation.

The ingredients often include grains, fruits, sugar, yeast, and water.

We commonly know alcohol as beer, wine, and liquor, but is alcohol a drug?

Origins of Alcohol

Alcoholic beverages go thousands of years back.

A sense of pleasure and relaxation became the basis for drinking alcohol.

  • Evidence of alcohol appeared from the discovery of beer jugs dating back to around 10,000 B.C.
  • Egyptian hieroglyphics from around 4,000 B.C. indicate drinking wine is mentioned throughout the Bible as well.

As the 19th century rolled in, limitations on drinking alcohol were enforced, especially through prohibition.

Since then, alcohol has been regulated by laws restricting certain age groups from buying and drinking.

However, these laws often fail to curb the use of alcohol.

Young people still find ways to drink, and alcohol has become common in most social gatherings and events.

Ingredients in Alcohol

The combination of sugars and yeast, and other ingredients, causes a chemical process that produces ethanol.

It is this ethanol that, when consumed, changes the way our brain and body function.

Different types of alcoholic beverages contain varying amounts of ethanol.

Certain drinks will cause more intense symptoms than others.

The higher the alcohol content, the stronger the symptoms.

Addiction is not affected by the content of alcohol.

It can happen whether you consume beer or the hard stuff.

The main question is: Is alcohol a drug?

Alcohol Content in Different Types of Drinks

High Content:

  • Moonshine 100%
  • Liqueurs up to 60%
  • Vodka up to 50%
  • Whiskey up to 50%
  • Tequila up to 40%
  • Rum up to 40%


Low Content:

  • Wine and Wine Coolers up to 20%
  • Ciders and Ales up to 8%
  • Beer up to 6%

Alcohol is a Drug

Is alcohol a drug? If so, what kind of drug is alcohol?

Alcohol is a type of depressant, similar to many prescription drugs.

Alcohol may not be “prescribed,” but it affects the brain in many of the same ways that other drugs do.

Prescription Depressants:

  • Tranquilizers
  • Antipsychotics
  • Sedatives
  • Sleeping pills

 
Is alcohol a drug that is considered as bad as prescription depressants?

Yes, alcohol is just as addictive as Xanax, Lunesta, Klonopin, or any other depressant.

Effects of Alcohol

The side effects of alcohol are what drives us to seek it out and drink it.

How many of us go to a social gathering and enjoy a beer or glass of wine?

Do those drinks help you to relax and be more sociable?

The marriage of food and alcohol is often enjoyed, especially with BBQs, dinner parties, and cocktail hours.

Why? Because the “side effects” of alcohol can loosen us up to have more fun.

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Short-term Side Effects of Alcohol

The most immediate side effect of alcohol is that it makes us feel drunk.

These are some of the symptoms of drunkenness:
 

  • Sense of calm, relaxation
  • Impaired motor skills
  • Lack of coordination
  • Impaired thinking
  • Dizziness
  • Slurred speech
  • Feeling tired
  • Lower heartbeat, blood pressure, breathing
  • Overall feeling of sadness
  • Urination difficulty
  • Blackouts

Long-term Side Effects of Alcohol

Is alcohol a drug that can cause serious and lasting side effects?

Yes, alcohol is the root of alcoholism, which is an addiction. 

Long term use of alcohol changes our brains and bodies in ways we may not be aware of.

Mental and Physical Side Effects

  • Addiction (alcoholism)
  • Alcohol poisoning
  • Loss of sex drive
  • Permanent brain damage
  • Liver damage/disease
  • Malnutrition
  • Blackouts
  • Stroke
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart disease
  • Ulcers
  • Gastritis
  • Cancer
  • Permanent nerve damage
  • Worsening of mental disorders
  • Suicidal thoughts/tendencies
  • Suicide
  • Death
  • Moodiness
  • Abusive behavior
  • Fetal deformities
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
  • Stillbirth
  • Miscarriage
  • Development of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome
    • An alarming 80% of alcoholics are deficient in thiamine. This deficiency can lead to Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome, which is a brain disorder causing encephalopathy or psychosis.

Social Side Effects

  • Divorce
  • Relationship strain
  • Self-isolation
  • Indirect harm through accidents
  • Loss of job
  • Loss of friends
  • Loss of home
  • Financial strain
  • Drunk driving that can lead to arrest or imprisonment
  • Loss of driving privileges
  • Arrest and imprisonment
  • Requiring a lifetime of someone caring for you

Mental Illness and Alcoholism

 
Is alcohol a drug that worsens existing mental disorders?

In short, yes, it can.

Alcohol abuse is associated with numerous mental disorders and can exacerbate their severity.
 

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Mental Disorders Associated with Alcoholism

Alcohol Abuse Leads to Addiction

Why is alcohol a drug of choice for so many of us?

Alcohol does not require a prescription and is obtainable by merely going to the store.

Is alcohol a drug that only affects adults? No, it has the same addictive ability for teens, middle-aged adults, as well as the elderly.

When is alcohol abuse a drug problem?

The varying demographics of alcohol abuse and addiction are startling in contrast to what many of us think.

Under-Age Alcohol Abuse Within the U.S. during 2018:

  • Approximately 7.1 million under the age of 20 consumed alcohol, of which 19.5% were females, and 18.2% were males.
  • Approximately 4.3 million under the age of 20 participated in binge drinking.
  • Approximately 861,000 (2.3% of the age-group population) under the age of 20 heavily abused alcohol.

 
Older Adults and Alcohol Abuse Within the U.S. during 2018:

  • 3% of adults admit to drinking alcohol.
  • 45% of adults admit to binge drinking.
  • 6% of adults admit to heavily abusing alcohol.

 
A study done in 2012 indicated that 10% of children in the U.S. had an alcoholic parent.
 
When is alcohol use an addiction?

  • You crave it and cannot go for long periods without it.
  • You drink all throughout the day or night.
  • You cannot enjoy social events without drinking.
  • You spend your last dollar on alcohol.
  • You become violent and abusive towards your loved ones.
  • You prefer to drink alone.

 
If you see yourself in any of the above scenarios, facts, or statistics, you need help.

Many of us with an addiction to alcohol do not view ourselves as alcoholics.

Taking the first step in admitting you are an alcoholic is the hardest part of this recovery journey.

Reaching Out for Help

When you continue to allow alcohol to control you and your life, you stand to lose so much.

Your sense of pride, independence, and your loved ones are far more precious than a drink.

Even worse, can you live with yourself if you drink and drive and end up killing someone?

Did you know that someone dies because of a drunk driver every 50 minutes in the U.S.?

How Do You Get Help?

Admitting you have a drinking problem is the first and hardest step.

Now it is time to get help from professionals who will be by your side the entire time.

The next step to take is to make that call.
 
North Jersey Recovery Center is a leading treatment facility for alcoholism.

We have a professional standing by 24/7 to take your phone call.

The moment you speak with someone, you will be embraced with compassion.

Inpatient

Detox is a necessary step to rid your body of alcohol.

You will be admitted as an inpatient where you have the choice of social or medical detox.

A team of medical professionals will be by your side during the entire process until you have stabilized.

After you are stable, you will then advance to the “inpatient hospitalization” program, where you ease back into life while still residing at the facility.

Outpatient

When you have graduated to the outpatient program, you will visit the facility as scheduled to continue treatment.

For those who need to plan their treatment around work, children, or school, we offer “intensive outpatient therapy.”

Payment and Insurance

Our staff is more than happy to verify your insurance on your behalf to make things easier for you. You also have the option to use our online verification form to do it yourself.


Regaining Control to Live a Full Life

Treatment is a gift to yourself and to those you love.

Do not let alcohol slowly strip you of the most valuable things and pleasures of life.

You have value and worth, and who knows, you may be the one who inspires someone else with the same problem to find help.

Be their inspiration!

Drugs and Music North Jersey Recovery Center - A group of partygoers attend a music concert where there is a surplus of drugs and alcohol around

Drugs and Music

What do Drugs and Music Have to do with Each Other?

Musicians throughout history resorted to drugs to augment their creativity.

Listeners also use drugs to enhance the gratification of music. Music and drugs can go hand in hand.

The amount of drug references in music has dramatically increased over the past few decades.

Many songs glorify drug abuse.

There is a powerful representation of drug use in music.

Neuromusicology

The study of “neuromusicology” explores how the human nervous system reacts to music.

For most people, music can help them.

The combination of music and drugs, on the other hand, can rewire the brain.

This makes the cycle of addiction more difficult to break.

Drugs and music together form a powerful association in the brain.

It strengthens the addiction cycle.

The lack of self-control and willpower leads to normalize repetitive addictive behavior.

Music and drug abuse

Numerous musicians have suffered from drug abuse. Many have overdosed on drugs.

Ozzy Osborne’s fame is overshadowed by his drug use.

Amy Winehouse, a Grammy award-winning singer and songwriter, died from alcohol poisoning. She was never able to overcome her addiction. Her song “Rehab” documented her active resistance to treatment.

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Miley Cyrus’s song “Molly” glorifies the drug MDMA. Most genres of popular music glorify drug abuse.

Coupling Music and Drugs

Music has shown strong mood-enhancing qualities.

Amphetamine is a stimulant that is associated with repetitive music. This drug facilitates the desire of people to dance.

MDMA or ecstasy goes with electric music with repetitive beats and movements.

Rap music often references marijuana, violence, and drug dealing in its lyrics.

Many songs that allude to drug abuse are known to cause intense cravings in former addicts.

Music represents a prevalent source of exposure to substance use.

You can fall, victim, if you fail to recognize that your music preferences can cause you to be susceptible to drug abuse.

Music Festivals and Drug Abuse

Drugs are a common feature at a music festival.

This practice began long before Woodstock glorified drug use as a means of “free expression.”  

Drug use is illegal, but music festivals are popular spots for illicit drug use.

One in four who attend these music festivals are under the influence of one or more substances. Attendees mostly use drugs to enhance their experience.

The atmosphere and availability of drugs create irresistible temptations.

Music festivals like Burning Man and Electric Daisy Carnival have become popular in recent years.

People who attend these events often plan to use or experiment with one or more types of drugs.

Alcohol is another substance responsible for a high number of overdoses during music festivals.

Dangerous side effects like dehydration can occur when using multiple substances.

Numerous deaths have been reported from overexposure, overdose, and exhaustion.

Using drugs is a dangerous practice that can lead you down the road of addiction.

Effects of Drugs and Music

You may think that using drugs or alcohol will enhance your enjoyment. 

However, the link between certain music genres and drug abuse is undoubtedly a key aspect of drug abuse.

Substance abuse can lead to some devastating consequences.

You can lose everything when you are unable to stop.

When treating drug abuse, sharing your involvement of drugs and music is a crucial part of treatment.

This information is useful in targeting and coming up with a plan designed to address your drug associations.

Programs can focus on harm reduction initiatives.

Learning to control your impulses that drive your drug use will allow you to develop self-control.

Minimizing these triggers to use will help you reach sobriety.

Mental Health, Music, and Drugs

Music has been known to soothe the soul.

You may listen to music to express yourself when you do not have the words to.

Many forms of music are used as an effective treatment for trauma.

However, when you pair music and drugs together, it can lead to a struggle to overcome addiction.

Your brain becomes accustomed to the routine of music and drugs.

Music may serve to normalize or justify your drug abuse.

Learning about the dangers of drugs can allow you to make better decisions.

Drug Abuse Treatment

If you are struggling with substance abuse, the time to seek treatment is now.

What may start off as innocent experimentation can become something far more dangerous.

Drug use can spiral out of control. You can find yourself completely dependent.

Without treatment for your addiction, you will suffer from uncomfortable symptoms of withdrawal.

You may even find yourself making reckless decisions and engaging in risky behaviors.

Understanding the root of your addiction is a step towards recovery.

If music is a trigger, you can learn to manage and develop skills to resist the urge to use.

Addiction does not go away on its own. It is a choice you must make every day.

Affordable Treatment Programs

Although music does not cause you to use drugs, it can certainly influence you.

Getting proper help is the key to overcoming your addiction.

North Jersey Recovery Center offers insurance verification to ensure that your treatment is covered.

Our staff will reach out on your behalf.

We will take the time to discuss the options with your insurance company.

We believe that everyone deserves the chance to find a program that works.

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Drug Rehab at North Jersey Recovery Center

Recovery from substance addiction involves making significant changes in your behavior.

Understanding the factors that influence your dependence is an important part of treatment.

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, it is important to seek help.

Everyone enters the addiction cycle differently.

Yet, the vicious cycle of drug abuse remains the same for everyone.

If you are struggling with stopping on your own, reach out to our call center for support.

We are here to help you through the entire process, from intervention to recovery.

You do not have to do this alone.

North Jersey Recovery Center wants to support your journey.

Sobriety Codependency North Jersey Recovery Center - A woman struggling with addiction is co-dependent on her husband during the path to recovery, which can be considered Sobriety Codependency

Sobriety Codependency

Co-Dependency and a Person’s Healthy Relationships

Co-dependency is a term popularly used when discussing sobriety.

Mental Health America defines co-dependency as a condition that affects a person’s ability to have healthy relationships, a condition often referred to as relationship addiction.

The relationships formed as a result of co-dependency can be one-sided and often toxic.

Those is recovery have a tend to build co-dependent relationships.

Meeting other people recovering from addiction can be tricky.

Putting the Needs of Other People First

Co-dependent relationships see one person continually putting the needs of the other person above their own.

Most co-dependent relationships involving recovering addicts usually involve a sober party who may act as a caretaker.

Co-dependent relationships are, by nature, very demanding.

There are several different sides to co-dependent relationships.

Unfortunately, most of the effects of co-dependency are harmful and counterproductive to addiction recovery.

How Does Co-Dependency Work

There is usually a structure to the nature of a co-dependent relationship.

The motivation behind co-dependency is often a deep-seated fear of being alone.

This fear of being alone makes people in co-dependent relationships go to great lengths to preserve these relationships.

Co-dependent relationships have two major roles.

Every co-dependent relationship has an enabler and a manipulator.

Several different factors may be responsible for why a person is co-dependent.

Co-dependents are usually the products of mental illness, dysfunctional homes, or childhood abuse.

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Enabler

An enabler, as the name implies, enables the other party by encouraging or allowing certain behavior.  

Enablers are usually passive people; in most cases, they allow things to happen to them.

Overtime in the relationship, enablers slowly lose their sense of identity to the other party.

Certain personality traits are usually associated with enablers. Traits like low self-esteem and a compulsive desire to please are characteristic of enablers.

Manipulator

In most co-dependent cases, the person struggling with addiction is the manipulator.

A manipulator takes advantage of the weaknesses of the enabler to have their way.

A manipulator may be aggressive or passive, depending on their personality types.

By preying on the weaknesses of the enabler, the manipulator can have their way.

Manipulators are takers in a co-dependent relationship.

Co-dependency is a significant threat to sobriety.

For someone in recovery, either of these two positions in a co-dependent relationship is bad.

As an enabler or a manipulator, a co-dependent relationship may catalyze relapse.

Negative Effects of Co-Dependency on Sobriety

One of the most obvious and major effects of co-dependency is its strain on those in the recovery process.

In situations where both parties used to abuse substances together, a co-dependent relationship is unhealthy.

When a recovering addict is focused on sobriety and has a manipulator partner, there is a risk of relapse.

It is not uncommon for one party to make the drug use a condition for a relationship.

Unfortunately, this may make the party trying to stay sober relapse.

Being co-dependent on a person does not help sobriety.

In some cases, a partner might intentionally cause a relapse.

Some partners prefer the dynamic of their relationships with substance abuse.

Getting used to a particular way of life with a partner might lead a manipulator to undermine recovery.

In other cases, the issue may not even be drug use.

There is a tendency for individuals in recovery to substitute one addiction with another, which is very unhealthy.

Although a person in recovery may not manipulate their partner for drugs, they may do so for other things.

There is also a tendency for partners to enable their sober partners as they pick up new addictions.

A co-dependency relationship may make it difficult for relapses to be addressed swiftly.

Enablers in these relationships might cover such incidents up for the recovering addict.

Treatment for Co-Dependency

Co-dependency can be treated, much like any other illness.

Treating co-dependency is essential. An example of a sobriety co-dependency is AA co-dependency.

It is important to ensure that your sobriety rests in your hands alone.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, our professionals are available to help you manage any co-dependency issues that you may have, such as AA codependency.

Treatment must begin with one party admitting that there is a problem.

There must be a genuine desire to solve the issue of co-dependency, like that of AA codependency.

Once a genuine willingness for treatment has been expressed, the process of treatment can begin.

Treatment for co-dependency may involve a number of different issues.

Where alcohol and substance abuse is ongoing, special treatment may need to be administered first.

It is generally agreed upon that psychotherapy is the most effective treatment for co-dependency.

Treatment is administered in stages; the first involves the individual, and then it involves the couples, and finally, it involves group therapy.

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Individual Therapy

Individual therapy involves one-on-one sessions with our licensed therapists at North Jersey Recovery Center.

This therapy is focused on observing why a partner may be co-dependent, such as for AA codependency.

It usually involves an in-depth analysis of emotions to discover the underlying reasons for behavior.

Group Therapy

In group therapy, those in recovery can discuss with other people who have gone through the same experiences.

In this therapy, you can discuss all types of sobriety co-dependency aspects, such as AA co-dependency.

Couples Counseling

In this stage, co-dependent partners can receive counseling on how to establish a more balanced relationship.

By analyzing situations, our therapists can help you recognize situations that are unhealthy for your relationship.

Each of these steps of therapy is essential for full and complete recovery.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we pride ourselves on offering the best quality of services to all of our clients.

If you or your partner require addiction treatment, our facilities are the best place to receive this.

We offer inpatient and outpatient treatment alongside Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

Your desire to be better is combined with our expertise to produce the best results possible.

We believe that you deserve to live the best quality of life possible.

We offer you access to a full team of therapists, medical professionals, and trained counselors.

Addiction Treatment at North Jersey Recovery Center

We ensure that all of our patients get the best treatment, especially for AA codependency.

This is why we offer free insurance verification.

We will contact your insurance company on your behalf to specify the nature of the treatment that you require.

We also accept PPO insurance in addition to private forms of payment for treatments received.

Our trained personnel are available to ensure that you receive full insurance benefits for your treatment.

Your full recovery is our major priority.

4 Unexpectedly Hard Things When it Comes to the Stages of Sobriety North Jersey Recovery Center - The stages of sobriety can be difficult, but when you have a strong support system behind you, it will help you through your journey to recovery

4 Unexpectedly Hard Things When it Comes to the Stages of Sobriety

Sobriety & The Stages of Sobriety

Sobriety is a prevalent topic in many different circles. There are also many stages of sobriety.

There are tons of books on sobriety that provide guidance on the best way to achieve it and maintain it.

Although there is so much content on how to get sober, there is little to prepare those about to begin the recovery process for actual sobriety.

This makes adjusting to sobriety rather difficult for a lot of those struggling with addiction or substance abuse.

Sobriety is a state of being sober.

This definition can also be interpreted to mean a state of normalcy.

For people coming from a place of addiction, normalcy may come with a few surprising elements.

This is why those in recovery need to be prepared for this lifestyle adjustment.

To help with the adjustment, we have compiled some unexpectedly hard things those in recovery face in sobriety.

Time Moves Very Slowly

One thing you hardly recognize while doing drugs is how much of your time it takes.

Most individuals who use drugs spend their days looking for a high, finding a high, and passing out from a high.

This constant cycle makes it feel like the days are short.

Unfortunately, days are not at all short, especially if you are not occupied.

Being sober can mean that days that previously seemed like they lasted six hours now last 24 hours.

Being in recovery means you must find what to do with all that extra time and follow the sobriety stage accordingly.

Naturally, after attacking basic tasks and being involved in one thing or another, there is still a lot of time left.

Boredom then begins to set in.

Getting sober never prepares you for the amount of unstructured time you have on your hands, which is why the stages of sobriety are so important.

Being off the influence of substances and having to face the reality of time passing may be difficult.

The slow passing of time may foster some negative thoughts, which may be hard to let go of.

It is not uncommon for feelings of regret about past actions to resurface in these times.

These feelings of regret may lead to depression.

The best way to handle this slow passing of time is to get busy – be active, find a new hobby, learn a new skill – whatever works for you.

Continually keeping yourself busy distracts your mind from the passing of time.

Remember, you have let go of what used to be a major part of your life.

It is essential to find healthy new habits to fill up that void in the stages of sobriety.

However, you must ensure that you do not stretch yourself too thin.

Stress and fatigue can both be triggers and should be avoided.

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Your Expectations May Not Be Reality

Addiction is a well-known adversary, and the many stages of sobriety are essential to consider continuously.

There are patterns and information available to help you beat this adversary.

Unfortunately, sobriety is not the end of the road.

What happens after addiction is also part of the journey to healing.

Having high expectations on how life will turn our after attaining sobriety is normal.

At the point of addiction, people around you will insist that your addiction prevents you from reaching your potential.

Continual repetition of this belief leads many people in recovery to believe that sobriety equals a better life.

The truth is that addiction is a disadvantage.

Being sober allows you to have a level platform to achieve your goals. Sobriety gives you an equal shot at life like everybody else. Sobriety is not a magical state where all dreams come true. It is simply reality and awareness.

It is important to come to terms with knowing you still have to work hard to realize all of your goals. All of your expectations for how life will be while sober can be achieved through hard work.

Sobriety is not a one-time state. It is a lifelong process.

The possibility of relapse will always remain a reality. You must make a conscious effort to ensure that these things do not discourage you.

Loneliness

Another thing that those in recovery have to deal with after achieving sobriety is loneliness.

Addiction rarely gives you time to enjoy your own company.

You become accustomed to being around friends, and it can be difficult to be alone.

You must learn to enjoy your own company again and to create a network of supporters. You will meet other people in the fight to stay sober. Find friends who have always been sober, to show you how they live.

Your initial loneliness is not permanent. Do not allow the initial loneliness to push you to make bad decisions, leading to a release. Loneliness is something that every person in recovery must prepare themselves for.

Facing challenges headfirst is uncomfortable, but it is necessary. Prepare to meet a lot of challenges.

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You No Longer Have A Shortcut

This particular effect of sobriety is hinted at several times, but only reality makes it sink in. While you were addicted, you could escape feeling certain emotions and avoid certain things.

Now that you are sober, you must experience every emotion. This can be unnerving and stressful. It will be important to identify a healthy, sustainable coping mechanism to help with the stress.  

Facing challenges headfirst is uncomfortable, but it is necessary. Prepare to meet a lot of challenges.

Help is Available at North Jersey Recovery Center

Our therapists and counselors are available to attend to you 24/7.

Our years of experience dealing with these issues have provided us with the best ways to help you.

We offer outpatient services so that you can call and have someone talk you through your emotions.

For us at North Jersey Recovery Center, it is not just a business.

We believe that each of our clients deserves the best treatment possible.

To ensure that our clients get the best treatments, we craft a custom plan for each client.

We accept PPO payments as well as other private forms of payments for treatment.

Our personnel will communicate with all of the relevant insurance providers on your behalf to ensure that you or your loved one get the treatment you need.

We are invested in your sobriety and want you to win.

How Does Family Help One Struggling with Addiction North Jersey Recovery Center - Parents of a loved one struggling with addiction are getting advice and guidance on how to help family with addiction

How Does Family Help One Struggling with Addiction?

Addiction Does Not Affect Only the Person with Addiction

Addiction does not affect only the person struggling with substance abuse; the disease often spills over to the person’s loved ones.

It might seem like as a loved one; you are not affected by the decisions and lifestyle of your friend or family member who is addicted.

It is essential to know that the word “addict” in this article is not only referring to individuals addicted to “street drugs,” but also people addicted to alcohol.

If you begin to truly open up about the choices and decisions you have made, you suddenly might start to understand that your life is just as affected as that of the person struggling with addiction.

North Jersey Recovery Center has set up structures that aid open conversations that help both the person struggling with substance abuse and those around them.

It is crucial to have a support system in your journey to recovery, and our specialists understand that.

Family and Addiction

Over time, the structure of families has developed.

It has grown to be more than the traditional nuclear family.

We now have single-parent families, foster families, blended families, and many others. 

The way each family is affected differ based on their structure.

An example of such differences is evident when a child develops a denial system that protects them from the reality of their parent’s addiction.

On the other hand, a single parent household does not have that option.

The children are more likely to behave in a way that does not match their age to compensate for their parent’s deficiency.

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The Extended Family is Not Left Out

Although the nuclear family feels the effects of substance abuse by a loved one directly, the extended family isn’t left out.

Members of the extended family might feel anger, embarrassment, anxiety, and sometimes even grief.

These reactions can often have a negative impact on both the person abusing substances and other generations. For example, a parent whose parent abused substances has the tendency of being overbearing and overprotective of his or her children.

There are patterns of interactions with different family structures that are often noticed when someone is addicted to drugs or alcohol.

Some of these include;

  • Negative Attitude: The communication between the members of the family is characterized by negativity. The entire atmosphere is downright gloomy, and constructive actions are not popular amongst members of the family. Most times, communication takes the form of complaints, verbal disapproval, and other types of displeasure. 
  • Parental Inconsistency: Disregard for responsibilities is one of the effects of addiction. Children often get confused because a clear boundary has not been drawn by the people or person in charge (parents). Without this set of rules and regulations both parent’s and children’s cannot be predicted. These inconsistencies are often present irrespective of the person abusing substances.
  • Unrealistic Expectations from Parents: It is no news that the influence of parents primarily affects their children. A parent’s expectations can be unrealistic. This often causes both parties to spiral out of control when their expectations cannot be met. When the expectations are too high, the child might give up and become lackadaisical. On the other hand, they may work obsessively.

Self-medication, miscarriage of emotions, and parental denial are also some of these patterns of interaction.

The best way to deal with all these cases is a complete restructuring of the family.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we have well-trained professionals that are skilled in family therapy and other programs that help reunite the family.

Family Help and Addiction

Family members play a significant role in their loved one’s recovery. 

Studies show that family support in the process of intervention contributed largely to the recovery success amongst addicts. The important thing is to be there for your loved one struggling with recovery during their trying times.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we have various treatments for those having a hard time quitting drugs and alcohol.

Some of these include Detox, Inpatient, Outpatient, Interventions, and other forms of treatment that will help your journey.

It is important to understand the feelings of family members, as members of your family form the essential support a person who is addicted to any substance needs.

The avenue by which these feelings are passed across is also as important.

During interventions, family members or loved ones often get hurt or confused.

These feelings are counterproductive to the recovery process of a person struggling with addiction or substance abuse.

This is why it is important to know how to help families with addiction.

However, there are strategies used to turn these ill feelings into positive motivation.

Some of these strategies include family therapy, counseling, family support groups, and open discussions.

The goal is to equip family members with the information and skill they will need in the journey ahead.

Once the family dynamic is stable, a stable support system is more guaranteed, and the chances of a successful recovery are higher.

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Addiction and Mental Health

An individual with both a mental health issue and an addiction problem is often more challenging to treat.

The term used to describe this is called a co-occurring disorder or a dual diagnosis.

Both the mental health issues and the drug or alcohol have their own peculiar symptoms. Most of these symptoms prevent you from carrying out your regular activities.

The situation gets more complicated because the co-occurring disorders also affect each other.

When there is no help for a person struggling with addiction, their mental health problems usually become more severe.

On the other hand, when a mental health issue goes untreated, substance abuse often gets worse.

The team of professionals at North Jersey Recovery Center is well equipped to handle your co-occurring disorder.

We ensure that every patient is paired with the most professional and highly trained addiction specialists in the country in a unique plan established for your recovery.

You can be sure that you or your loved ones are in good hands.

Payment Methods and Free Insurance Verification

The services we offer at North Jersey Recovery Center are top-notch.

We aspire to give each client a blissful experience, including payment methods that are suitable for you and your loved ones.

We accept most PPO insurance, private pay options, and we also offer payment plans.

Wee aim to provide quality services at affordable prices.

To make your experience more stress-free, we take on the burden of communicating with your insurance provider on your behalf.

We aim to ensure that you or your loved one get the help they need.

Treatment at North Jersey Recovery Center

Whenever family therapy is adopted in the treatment of an individual struggling with addiction, social problems associated with substance abuse should be considered.

Often, issues such as joblessness, domestic violence, child abuse, or neglect are noticed among families dealing with substance abuse.

Our team works together with professionals in other fields to effectively treat these issues to ensure effective concurrent treatment.

Furthermore, multifamily group therapy, individual therapy, and psychological consultation can be added to family therapy.

These various approaches aid concurrent treatment.

Also, empowering the family is a crucial benefit that should not be sacrificed.

Relapse Prevention Warning Signs & Triggers North Jersey Recovery Center - A man has relapsed due to ignoring the relapse presentation warning signs and triggers

Relapse Prevention Warning Signs & Triggers

Relapse – One of the Biggest Fears of a Person in Recovery

One of the biggest fears of every person in recovery is relapsing. This is why it is so important to be aware of any relapse prevention warning signs.

Recovery from addiction usually comes with a lot of different challenges.

Sobriety is often described as a journey because of the length of time to get to a safe and healthy place.

Addiction is a war that lasts a lifetime.

Battling addiction while dealing with the day-to-day challenges that come with life is extremely tasking.

Those in recovery agree that there are so many different relapse prevention warning signs and triggers that may cause a relapse.

Avoiding these triggers and thriving is very difficult but still possible.

To relapse simply means to slip back into a former state.

In this case, a relapse means moving back into drug use and abuse.

One important thing to note is that a decline can happen at any time.

In some cases, a relapse may be a one-time thing only.

In other cases, a relapse may lead to several further declines and, eventually, back to addiction.

What determines whether relapse is a one-time thing or if it is not is how it is managed.

Persons in recovery need to be able to recognize their possible relapse prevention warning signs and triggers and have a relapse plan in place to handle them.

Triggers

In most cases, triggers vary from person to person.

However, some universal triggers have been identified.

These situations make those on the path to sobriety susceptible to relapse.

Having a better understanding of these triggers can help with relapse prevention warning signs.

Unrealistic Expectations

A lot of persons in recovery expect their lives to completely change after overcoming addiction.

It is natural to feel that major changes should begin to happen after such a significant life adjustment.

The disappointment that comes when these expectations are not fulfilled can be a relapse trigger.

Individuals in recovery is a process that may take some time goes a long way in preventing a relapse.

Part of recovery is getting your life back, and this will take some time.

Old/Familiar Friendships

Falling back into old habits with old acquaintances can also be a trigger for relapses.

Friends may remind you of the euphoria of drug use while leaving out the bad parts.

Those working toward sobriety need to avoid or limit their interactions with old friends.

Being around old friends allows you to consider drugs as an option when you are in bad situations.

To ultimately ensure that drugs are not a solution for anything, you must keep old friends who encourage bad habits away.

Anger

Even sober people can find themselves doing unnatural things when angry.

For people on the path to recovery, anger should be monitored closely as a trigger.

Most people in recovery may feel an urge to resort to drug use to deal with anger.

Individuals practicing sobriety must learn how to process anger without drugs.

It is also vital for those in recovery to avoid getting angry as much as they can.

Anger management can be treated with Cognitive Behavior Therapy.

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Loneliness

A lot of people that just completed treatment deal with loneliness.

This emotion is dangerous because most individuals in recovery may use pills to dull the loneliness.

Whenever you may feel lonely, take some time to join a support a team to distract yourself.

As much as possible, persons in recovery should avoid being lonely because it is a trigger.

It is essential to be surrounded by friends and a network of supporters who can engage you well enough to prevent a relapse.

Hunger

Although it is hardly talked about, being hungry can cloud judgment.

It is healthily that those in recovery eat and frequently.

Having a good meal makes you less likely to slip-up and relapse.

Regular meals and healthy snacks are essential to prevent any potential relapses.

Fatigue

Those in recovery need to pace themselves.

The initial excitement of being drug-free may lead many people who were once living a life revolving around addiction to take on more than they can handle.

It is crucial to ensure that you expend energy consciously.

Fatigue makes anyone vulnerable, and it is crucial to avoid situations that may cause a person in recovery to feel powerless.

If you are spread too thin, you may begin to look for energy sources, which may lead you back to square one.

Relapse Prevention Warning Signs

Identifying triggers is one of the first steps to preventing relapse.

However, it is just as important to recognize what signs may indicate that a relapse is possible. 

Understanding the warning signs of relapse allows you to take precautionary steps to prevent relapse.

The decline is more of a process than an isolated event. Relapses are usually a three-step process: emotional, mental, and physical.

The warning signs of a relapse can also be classified into these three categories:

Emotional Warning Signs

Emotional warning signs are usually part of the process where the person begins to feel negative emotions.

At this point, most people have no intention of relapsing. Certain emotions must be monitored closely to ensure that they do not lead to a relapse.

Anxiety

Anxiety is a major emotional sign of a relapse.

When a person begins to worry intensely about the future, they are more vulnerable to relapse.

Worrying about things that cannot be controlled usually pushes recovering addicts to find escapes.

Recurring feelings of anxiety are a warning sign.

Mood Swings

Mood swings are usually indicative of a potential relapse.

In most instances, the highs and lows of mood swings usually leave those in recovery vulnerable.

Where you notice a repeated pattern of mood swings, it is essential to seek help.

Anger

Anger can also be indicative of a potential relapse.

Frequent outbursts of anger usually leave people disoriented and vulnerable.

If such episodes become more and more prevalent, it may be a sign of a likely relapse.

Mental Warning Signs

At this point, the emotional warning signs outlined above may have driven a person to consider using substances again.

Most of the mental warning signs are an internal struggle between relapsing and staying healthy.

The person may consider relapsing as a coping mechanism for emotional stress.

Some mental stress warning includes:

Having Fantasies about Relapsing

Fantasizing about relapsing is a substantial mental warning sign.

In most cases, constant consideration of the possibility of relapsing ends with people relapsing.

Lying

If you frequently find yourself lying about things, you may have a problem.

It is essential to be accountable to friends and family. Dishonesty may create a platform for relapsing.

Glamorizing your Past

Always reminiscing and glamorizing former drug use can lead to a relapse.

It is essential to let go of those memories and focus on making new ones.

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Hanging Around Old Spots

If you frequently hang around spots where you used to do drugs, you may have a problem.

There is a higher possibility of a person relapsing in familiar environments.

Staying far away from such places is the best option.

Treatment

If you have experienced any of these warning signs, you may need professional help to maintain your sobriety.

Although some relapses are one-time events, most relapses lead right back to a full-on addiction.

Our professionals are available at North Jersey Recovery Center to help manage your triggers and warning signs.

When well managed, these warning signs are only signs.

Our professionals are experienced in dealing with relapses.

To ensure that all of our clients experience the best services, we offer free insurance verification services.

The best therapy and treatment services for relapse prevention will be administered to you.

Our personnel will contact your insurance providers directly to ensure that you get the necessary coverage.

Sobriety is a journey.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we ensure that you continue to move forward on your journey. You deserve a happy and healthy life, and this is what we aim to give to you.

What Causes Addiction North Jersey Recovery Center - A young man sits with a professional and experienced psychiatrist to determine what the cause of his addictions are and the best treatment plan for him based on his addiction needs and requirements

What Causes Addiction?

Like many people, you may wonder what causes addiction to drugs and alcohol.

The answer to this question is important for everyone to know.

However, they’re especially important to people facing serious drug or alcohol problems.

Why? By learning the causes of addiction, you can improve your understanding of what is happening to you or your loved one facing addiction issues.

This, in turn, may enable you to help yourself or your loved one find effective addiction treatment.

What Causes People to Use Drugs or Alcohol

There is no single reason why people start using drugs or alcohol.

Research shows that the most common motivations for substance use include:
 

  •         A desire to increase feelings of pleasure
  •         A desire to escape mental or physical pain
  •         Peer pressure or a desire to belong
  •         Curiosity about the effects of drugs or alcohol
  •         A desire to get better grades at school
  •         A desire to boost work performance[I]


It is important to note that most people start using drugs or alcohol on their own.

However, some people are forced into substance use.

In the beginning, almost no one expects that drinking or drug use will lead to addiction.

Instead, they end up losing control over their substance intake.

When this happens, substance use becomes involuntary.

Why People Become Addicted

 
One of the most important facts about addictive substances is that not everyone who uses them will develop an addiction.

No one can say for sure who will go on to develop serious drug or alcohol problems.

However, experts know that there are many possible underlying reasons for addiction.

These reasons include such things as:
 

  •         A genetic tendency toward addiction
  •         Getting involved in substance use before you’re an adult
  •         Having a significant mental illness
  •         Having an unstable or unhappy home life
  •         Having parents who don’t provide adequate supervision
  •         Having trouble fitting in socially
  •         Having friends or acquaintances who drink or use drugs
  •         Living in an environment where substance use is common
  •         Having problems at school
  •         Having problems in the workplace
  •         Living in a place where poverty is common

 
Not everyone affected by these risks will develop an addiction.

Still, their presence increases the odds of developing a problem.

In any one person, the potential causes of addiction can overlap.

For this reason, specialists view addiction as a complex condition, not a simple one.


What Causes Addiction in the Brain

 
Addiction affects both the brain and the body.

However, the actual causes of addiction are found in the brain. When thinking about addiction and the brain, it helps to understand a few things.

First, when you drink or take a drug or medication, that substance enters your bloodstream. Once it does, it travels to your brain.

After gaining access to your brain, drugs and alcohol have multiple effects. The most important effects occur in a brain area called the pleasure center when it comes to addiction.

The pleasure center gets its name because it’s where your brain creates pleasurable sensations.

These sensations occur whenever you do something that increases the production of a brain chemical called dopamine. Lots of everyday activities produce dopamine and cause you to feel pleasure.

Common examples include:

However, as a rule, none of these activities boost your dopamine levels as much as drugs or alcohol.

In fact, certain drugs can raise your dopamine output up to ten times beyond normal levels. 

This explains why people feel such a surge of pleasure when they first use these substances.

It also helps explain why some people develop a pattern of frequent substance use.

Physical Dependence (Addiction and the Body)

 
Unfortunately, if you repeatedly use an addictive substance, your brain starts to change.

Eventually, it will start treating the high levels of dopamine as a normal situation. When this happens, you develop something called physical dependence.

Physical dependence means that you now need a certain quantity of drugs or alcohol to satisfy your brain.

If you don’t get that amount, you can go into substance withdrawal. Withdrawal is your brain’s way of telling you that it expects you to take more of a given substance.

Psychological Dependence (Addiction and the Mind)

 
People addicted to drugs or alcohol are not just affected by physical dependence. They also suffer from something called psychological dependence. This form of dependence means that you experience emotional changes that support uncontrolled substance use.
 
One of the most important symptoms of psychological dependence is a strong urge to consume drugs or alcohol.

In addition, it produces a strong compulsion to seek out more substances to consume.

Physical and psychological dependence have a combined effect. This fact helps explain why it can be so hard to recover from addiction.

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What Chemicals Make Substances Addictive?

 
You may wonder what chemical makes drugs addictive.

You may also wonder what chemical makes alcohol addictive.

However, this is not quite the way to think about addiction.

The most important thing is not the specific chemicals in drugs or alcohol. (In fact, not all addictive substances contain similar active ingredients.)

Instead, what matters is how drugs and alcohol affect your system.

As long as a substance triggers major increases in your dopamine levels, its use can lead to addiction.

This is true, no matter how that substance produces a dopamine increase.

Learn More About What Causes Addiction

 
What is addiction? Doctors define this condition as a chronic disease triggered by excessive use of drugs, medications, or alcohol.

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Not everyone who uses too much of these substances will become addicted.

Still, a significant percentage of people will.

There is more than one reason for getting involved in substance use.

Similarly, there’s more than one underlying cause of addiction, and multiple causes often appear together in the same person.

The process of addiction begins when drugs or alcohol boost your brain’s levels of dopamine. Higher dopamine levels lead to increased pleasure.

The amount of dopamine produced by addictive substances is far greater than the amount produced by everyday pleasures, which explains why people repeatedly use these substances.

It also helps explain why some users get caught in a cycle of substance abuse and addiction.

There is no one chemical in drugs that leads to addiction.

The same fact holds true for alcohol. Instead, regardless of the specific chemicals they contain, all addictive substances trigger major dopamine increases.

Addicted people suffer from two problems: physical addiction to substances and mental addiction to substances.

Physical addiction leads to rising substance tolerance, while mental addiction leads to compulsive urges to use drugs or alcohol.

The two forms of addiction work together, not separately, and this is what makes treating addiction so difficult.

Still, it’s possible to treat even the worst effects of drug or alcohol addiction.

For more information on how to help someone with an addiction, just contact our experts at North Jersey Recovery Center today.