Dad slumped over on desk with alcohol bottle and son watching - Drinking In Private

Drinking In Private: When Everyone Else Is Oblivious To Your Drinking

Last Updated: Jun 14th 2022

Reviewed by EliteStrategies

Your secret drinking is far from safe when you are enduring the struggle on your own. It may feel embarrassing or shameful to share your issues concerning alcohol with anyone. It’s definitely understandable, especially when it seems you are holding up well from an outsider’s perspective. The last thing you want is for anyone to know that you are not actually holding it together. In case it wasn’t already glaringly obvious, hiding or suppressing your habit to the public does nothing to make it disappear or control it. All it does is add a layer of unnecessary humiliation to a battle that is already difficult enough. As an alcohol rehab facility in Passaic County NJ and the surrounding counties, North Jersey Recovery Center would rather that our patients healthily tackle their addictions, as opposed to complicating them further. For today, let’s talk about drinking in private: When everyone else is oblivious to your drinking. 

What Are The Signs That Someone Is Hiding Their Alcoholism?

Although the numbers are showing much promise in regards to alcohol use disorder or alcoholism, it’s still a battle many people face within themselves, their families, or with their work peers. There are numerous indications that someone is plagued by alcoholism. Some are more noticeable than others. Here are some examples of the telltale signs:

  • Alcohol Tolerance: Those plagued with a drinking problem will have grown their tolerance to alcohol. Loved ones may notice that it takes quite a bit more alcohol to get them to the limit of satisfaction.
  • Hiding Or Stashing Alcohol: Someone in your life may stumble upon hidden bottles in uncanny locations. Some examples of hiding or stashing alcohol in locations include drawers, closets, cars, and desk drawers. The hiding places could even be more crafty than this (i.e., hiding it in mattresses or within soda containers). This is one of many red flags, indicating that someone has a problem with alcoholism. 
  • Masking Alcohol Abuse: To prevent others from finding out about their alcoholism, patients might mask their abusive drinking by consuming vodka. Why? Because vodka lacks the strong odor of other alcoholic beverages and mixes well with other drinks. Thus, making it easier to hide from friends and family. 
  • An Increase In Physical Signs Of Abuse: Due to the impact of alcoholism on the mind and body, the chances of getting hurt rises in addition to having a compromised immune system. Continued abuse could have damaging effects on your internal health. 

Imagine dealing with these symptoms on top of trying to keep your addiction under wraps, away from your loved ones? It’s a tough burden to shoulder, and no one should have to go through this alone.

Coming To Terms With Alcoholism

Believe it or not, secrecy whittles away at your strength. If you and only you are aware of the depth and degree to which you are drinking, the problem is likely to persist and manifest. Shame can feel isolating and intense. It has the potential to lead to a downward spiral and an increased consumption of drinking. Do not be afraid to ask for help. Admitting that you are no longer in control is a perfect example of being vulnerable enough to admit that you have a problem that warrants professional intervention. Alcohol has the power over you. What you once thought was a pleasurable lubricant has now transformed into pain. Pain that you have come to protect by internalizing and rationalizing. Do yourself a favor and release yourself from this responsibility. Allow our alcohol rehab facility in Passaic County NJ to serve as a guiding light for you during these harrowing times. This is not about blame, it’s about starting a new beginning with a form of structure that has been proven to help patients get back on their feet. 

Confiding In Someone Within Your Inner Circle

You don’t necessarily need to scream from the rooftops to get attention. All you will need is one trusting person you can count on, someone who won’t judge you or run away. The act of admission on its own is enough to alleviate much of the stress you were previously holding onto. When this is done, the secret is no longer yours to bear alone. You have someone to support you and learn about the parts of you that have been sheltered for so long. This person may not know what to say or do, but that does not mean that they can’t be of some help. Rely on them for their honesty and willingness to walk by your side, as you make changes, seek assistance in an alcohol rehab facility in Passaic County NJ, and grow in a positive direction, regardless of how long it may take. With their protection and partnership, you will have an easier time in making it to the next phase of your fight.

An Unwavering Commitment To Be Candid

If you have already allowed some people into your life and how addiction has overturned it, then bravo to you. This is a good start, but your journey of lifelong sobriety does not end here. This journey will be riddled with ups and downs. Don’t allow the bad days to bring you back to that place of isolation. Hold onto that special person or group of people who know everything about your struggle. They will act as a pillar of strength and will also keep you in check. Your secretive alcohol abuse or misuse led you down a dark and dangerous path. This special bond will shine a guiding light toward rehabilitation and a new sense of self.

Putting A Stop To Your Private Alcoholism: Help From A Professional Alcohol Rehab Facility In Passaic County NJ

We encourage you to always seek help with our alcohol rehab facility in Passaic County NJ. Get the treatment you deserve to help you or your loved one regain control of your life and into a more stable situation. Do not wait any longer. Contact North Jersey Recovery Center today to begin the journey of sobriety!  

Reviewed for Medical & Clinical Accuracy by EliteStrategies

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