Black Tar Heroin Abuse and Addiction North Jersey Recovery Center - A young woman is mixing the black drug, otherwise known as black tar heroin, into a spoon before she heats up the spoon to inject the dangerous substance into her body.

Black Tar Heroin Abuse and Addiction

Black Tar Heroin

Heroin, in any of its forms, is a powerful opioid drug.

It is made from morphine, a naturally occurring substance contained in the seeds of opium poppy plants.

But this Schedule I drug has no approved medical uses and an incredibly high potential for addiction.

Any amount of heroin use can prove to be dangerous.

If you are using or addicted to the black drug, our comprehensive addiction programs help you make necessary changes today.

Common Forms of Heroin

Black tar heroin is the second most common form of this particular opioid.

Powdered heroin is the most common. This powder is usually white or brown.

Heroin, in different forms, is typically smoked, injected, snorted, or swallowed.

In scientific settings, the black drug is known as diacetylmorphine.

More commonly, it is known as heroin, dope, black drug, or smack.

How Does Black Tar Heroin Addiction Start?

Heroin users rarely begin using heroin. Most heroin users report trying it for the first time after developing a tolerance to prescription opioids. Prescription painkillers, like Vicodin and Percocet, are two of the most common gateways.

When you abuse opioids, they begin to become less effective. This leads to many opioid users to try something stronger. Around 948,000 American adults reported using heroin between 2015 and 2016.

Often, heroin is less expensive, more potent, and easier to obtain than prescriptions. It produces similar effects at higher and faster levels. For these reasons, black tar heroin and other forms appeal to those with persistent pains and opioid addictions.

However, once you make the switch to black tar heroin, it is challenging to go back. This is true whether you are hoping to switch back to prescription opioids or cease drug use altogether.

Where Does Black Tar Heroin Come From?

Heroin itself comes from the morphine in the seeds of opium poppy plants native to Mexico, Colombia, and Asia. The majority of heroin used or seized in the United States comes from Mexico.

Heroin is one of the most frequently smuggled drugs. As such, seizures from heroin use have continued to increase over the decades. In addition, arrests and prison sentences for crimes related to heroin have increased.

Initiatives have been put in place to counter, monitor, and decrease drug trafficking, but there are still many obstacles to face to get heroin use to decrease as much as possible.

Short-Term Side Effects of Smoking Black Tar Heroin

The short-term side effects of smoking black tar heroin are ones that users hope to experience over the unpleasant long-term side effects. These side effects include feelings of euphoria, pleasurable feelings, stress and anxiety relief, and drowsiness.

These are highly addictive feelings for many drug users. Because they are short-lived, you are forced to quickly and frequently increase your dose to achieve the same effects. As you continue using heroin, reaching the original effects of your “first high” becomes increasingly difficult.

These short-lived effects contribute to the potential for addiction. They also increase the chance of an overdose. Black tar heroin, the black drug, and other forms of heroin alter your brain’s chemistry. They alter the pathways, rewiring the ways our brains and bodies produce, and recognize certain feelings.

After some time, it is harder for your brain to produce these feelings naturally. This dependency is dangerous and has led to a troubling increase in heroin-related overdoses. Between 1999 and 216, overdoses related to heroin increased from 1,960 to 15,469.

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Long-Term Side Effects of Smoking Black Tar Heroin

Many people begin smoking black tar heroin to achieve pleasurable, euphoric, or drowsy feelings without knowing on what dangers and health issues the drug can cause. Heroin rewires your brain and breaks down your mental processes.

With short and long-term use, smoking black tar heroin causes various unpleasant and potentially dangerous side effects. Heaviness in the limbs, cloudy mental states, and unexpected changes from consciousness to semi-consciousness are common side effects of heroin use. Others include intense itchiness, nausea or vomiting, dry mouth, and warm flushes.

As unpleasant as these may be, these are some of the milder side effects. With long-term or high quantities of use of the black drug, some common heroin abuse side effects include:

  • Insomnia
  • Skin abscesses
  • Cramps and constipation
  • Infections in the heart lining or valves
  • Pneumonia
  • Liver disease and kidney disease
  • Mental health impairments

On its own, heroin is a dangerous substance; however, it becomes increasingly dangerous when mixed with other substances. Many heroin users have mixed it with crack cocaine to create a substance called a speedball. This combination increases the risk of suffering permanent mental or physical damage and even an overdose.

Black Tar Heroin and Mental Health

On top of the dangerous physical side effects of black tar heroin use, it also impairs your mental health. Depression and anxiety are two mental health disorders often linked to heroin use. Heroin use can generate a new mental health disorder or worsen an existing one. Dual diagnosis is the term for co-existing mental health disorders and addictions. If you are battling a dual diagnosis, you are not alone. And our specialized dual diagnosis programs can help.

Black Tar Heroin Withdrawal Symptoms

Black tar heroin withdrawal symptoms are generally intense and severe. This is one factor that makes it so challenging to quit on your own. However, our medically-assisted detoxes were designed for situations like this one. Within a few hours of ceasing heroin use, you may begin experiencing withdrawal symptoms. Heroin withdrawals are typically more physical and psychological. Some common heroin withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Anxiety
  • Insomnia
  • Excessive sweats
  • Muscle cramps

On average, heroin withdrawal symptoms begin from eight to 24 hours after you stop using heroin. They can last from four to 10 days. But certain approved and monitored medications help ease the pain and discomfort of withdrawal symptoms.

These medications are designed to reduce drug cravings too. Our medical detox is one of the various benefits of seeking addiction care in our luxurious facility with our dedicated and passionate staff.

Drug Addiction Treatment Options

Our drug addiction treatment options range from full-time stays to a few hours spent in our facility per week. Inpatient treatment in our safe, comfortable, and secure facility are ideal for anyone who needs a more structured environment.

We offer a space full of luxury amenities, daily structure, proven treatment methods, and support away from stressful situations, temptations, triggers, and distractions. Focusing on your recovery and learning healthy life skills to maintain your sobriety moving forward is of utmost importance.

During inpatient stays, you can focus full-time on healing your body and mind. Our behavioral therapies, proven techniques, and holistic remedies provide an opportunity for a well-rounded recovery.

For those who do not need 24-hour care or have obligations that require their attention at home, we offer several other programs, combining care and flexibility.

We work with you to identify the addiction treatment program that best suits your addiction, mental health disorders, and additional needs. These alternative programs include outpatient programs, partial care programs, and intensive outpatient programs.

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Paying for Drug Addiction Treatments

Most major health insurance providers provide addiction care coverage. If you have health insurance coverage, your program may be partially or fully covered.

If you are unsure what is covered under your policy, please call our team of experienced admissions specialists. They will perform fast and free insurance verification to determine what your insurance policy covers. If you do not have health insurance, our team of experts will outline alternative payment options.

North Jersey Recovery Center

When you choose North Jersey Recovery Center, you choose high-level, customized, and dedicated addiction care.

You choose a safe, comfortable, and convenient facility away from the noise and distractions of New Jersey, New York City, or even your hometown that is full of familiar triggers and places — reminding you of your drug use.

See the difference a well-rounded and dedicated approach can make.

Call us today.

The Opioid Epidemic - North Jersey Recovery - Close up photo of the chest of a man in scrubs with a stethoscope around his neck as he holds out a bottle of opioids in his left hand and some white pills in his right hand.

The Opioid Epidemic: What Is It and What Can You Do?

The Opioid Epidemic

The most common drugs related to the opioid epidemic are fentanyl, heroin, oxycodone, and hydrocodone.

Morphine, codeine, methadone, and tramadol are other common opioids.

Both natural and synthetic prescription and illicit drugs have driven the opioid epidemic.

Nearly 450,000 people died from overdoses involving opioids from 1999 to 2018.

Opioids vs. Opiates

Opiates are drugs naturally derived from the seeds of opium poppy plants.

Opioids are either fully synthetic or partially synthetic.

This means that they are created chemically or with both chemical and natural ingredients.

Opioids are classified as any drugs that produce opiate-like effects, encompassing both categories and driving what we call the opioid epidemic.

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Opioid Misuse Rates

Many opioids and opiates have valuable medical uses when they are taken appropriately, but they are rarely used the right way. And many of them are highly addictive and dangerous. Their potency and addictive qualities make them easy to abuse.

Their high rates of abuse and addiction have led to alarming numbers of fatal overdoses, medical conditions, and accidents. This is why it is known as the opioid epidemic.

Approximately 10.3 million individuals reported misusing opioids within the last year when surveyed in 2018. There were 9.9 million misused prescription painkillers, 808,000 used heroin, and about 506,000 used both.

In both prescription and illicit drug use, opioid abuse can be hard to monitor and control.

Causes of the Opioid Epidemic

The opioid epidemic has occurred in waves. And the causes of the opioid epidemic have changed accordingly. During the 90s, the opioid epidemic was driven by an increase in prescription opioids.

Overdoses and patterns of physical and mental health problems led to shorter-term and fewer prescriptions. The next wave started in 2010 when we see an alarming and rapid increase in fatal heroin overdoses. Because there are no prescriptions or medical uses for heroin, its use became increasingly difficult to regulate.

The final wave started less than a decade ago in 2013. This wave was driven by synthetic opioids. With this wave, we saw a significant increase in fatal overdoses that involved the synthetic fentanyl. Traces of fentanyl are often found in heroin samples, illicit pills, and cocaine.

Drug dealers may slip fentanyl into their other drugs to keep their costs low and profit high. This practice can be deadly for unsuspecting drug users. There is no singular cause of the opioid epidemic. Each one presents unique dangers and concerns.

Prescription Opioids

Addictions to prescription opioids often start after an accident or injury occurs. These high-level painkillers are often prescribed for moderate to severe or unresponsive pains.

When used the right way, they can ease your pain and create euphoric feelings while you heal. But after a while, you may notice that they are not as effective as they were at the start. T

his usually means that your body is building a tolerance to its effects. As this happens, you will need to take more to achieve the same level of pain relief and other side effects.

You may be driven to take them in larger doses or take them more frequently. You may also begin to experience drug cravings. This is when addiction begins.

Drug cravings and withdrawal symptoms can make it hard for you to stop taking opioids. Increasing doses and graduating to stronger drugs are common. But these activities can compromise your health, altering your thoughts and behaviors along the way.

Our comprehensive addiction treatments can help you end the abusive cycle of addiction.

Side Effects of Opioid Addictions

Like many other drugs, there is a wide range of possible side effects from opioid addiction. These effects can be both physical and psychological.

Many remain the same, regardless of whether they are natural or synthetic, but other factors may alter them. Your method of ingestion, mental health, and the use of additional substances are a few important factors to consider. Some of the most common opioid-related side effects include:

  • Nausea
  • Constipation
  • Itchiness
  • Drowsiness
  • Confusion and memory loss
  • Mood swings, including depressive episodes
  • Respiratory depression or slowed breathing

You do not have to live with the side effects of your opioid addiction. Entering an addiction treatment program is the first step in building a healthy, sober life.

Opioids and Mental Illnesses

As is made clear by the side effects listed above, opioids can impair your mental health. Confusion, memory loss, and mood swings are commonly linked to opioid abuse.

Beyond these side effects, other mental health impairments are possible, as well. If you have diagnosed or undiagnosed depression, taking opioids can worsen it. But beginning with opioids can lead to depression because of the way that it alters your brain chemistry.

The link is strong and can connect opioids and mental illnesses in either direction. Dual diagnosis is the term we use for addiction and mental health disorders co-existing.

We offer a specialized program that addresses each of these unique concerns, as well as their connection. Breaking the connection and treating each disorder simultaneously can ensure that one does not remain and worsen the other in time.

Addiction Treatment Options

Each of our addiction treatment programs takes place in our comfortable, safe, and amenity-packed facility. We are conveniently located for those throughout New Jersey and others looking to distance themselves from Manhattan during their recovery.

Enjoy the highest levels of privacy during your treatment outside of New York City and away from all of the distractions and temptations it holds. For addictions as strong as those to opioids, inpatient care is often preferred.

This type of program often begins with medical detox to ease your withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings. It then continues into 24-hour care.

Each day will be filled with healthy meals, proven therapeutic methods, meetings, support groups, down-time, and holistic remedies. But if you have family or work obligations that require you to stay at home, we offer several other incredible options, too.

Our partial care, outpatient, and extensive outpatient programs allow you to live at home while spending a set number of hours at our facility each week. We will work with you to determine the program that will best suit your addiction and needs before you begin.

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Insurance for Opioid Addiction Treatment

Most major health insurance providers offer some level of coverage for addiction care treatments. If you have health insurance, but are not sure what is covered under your plan, please call our admissions specialist. They will review and verify your insurance for you.

This service is free and will move you past this first step so you can focus on preparing for recovery. If you do not have health insurance, they can also provide you with alternative payment options. Today is the day to choose change.

North Jersey Recovery Center

Addiction is a powerful and chronic disease that builds over time.

You do not have to live this way.

The best way to overcome your opioid addiction is to accept the help, care, and guidance available to you.

Commit yourself to a dedicated long-term approach and put the pieces back together.

Call us today for more information.

Heroin Withdrawal and Detox North Jersey Recovery Center - A young male is sitting on the street with his head in his hands as he starts to feel the effects of heroin withdrawal symptoms.

Heroin Withdrawal and Detox

Heroin Addiction

Addictions to this powerful and dangerous opioid drug come with troubling heroin withdrawal symptoms.

Your body and brain quickly become reliant on the effects that it produces.

And heroin withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings can make it difficult for you to quit on your own.

Heroin is a Schedule I drug that has no approved medical uses and a high potential for addiction.

Still, in 2016, about 948,000 Americans had used heroin within the last year.

Most graduated to heroin after becoming addicted to prescription opioids.

If this story sounds familiar, help is available.

Common Forms of Heroin

In any form, heroin is addictive and may cause heroin withdrawal symptoms with prolonged use.

The most common form is that of a white or brown powder. Sticky black tar heroin is the second most common form.

Heroin users do not typically start with this powerful and addictive opioid. As we mentioned before, most heroin users try it after developing a tolerance to prescriptions like Vicodin and Percocet. These prescription opioids produce side effects that reduce physical pain and reduce your anxiety to make you feel more relaxed.

But after prolonged prescription opioid abuse, the effects become weaker. For this reason, many people who are addicted to prescription opioids eventually seek something stronger.

Heroin produces similar effects to prescription opioids and is cheaper, more potent, and easier to find. Unfortunately, heroin is also more dangerous.

If your heroin withdrawal symptoms have prevented you from quitting, we can help.

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Problems Related to Untreated Heroin Withdrawal Symptoms

Heroin addictions can run rampant and leave you feeling powerless if left untreated.

Heroin addiction can impact everything from your finances and criminal record to your career and relationships.

Heroin is one of the most frequently smuggled illicit drugs, and heroin seizures have been rising over the last decade. As such, sentencing for heroin-related crimes has increased over the last decade.

But the most pressing concern is the number of heroin-related deaths. In just the state of California, 45% of drug overdose deaths involved opioids in 2018.

Heroin is a powerful and dangerous opioid that rewires your brain’s chemistry. Do not let it control your life for one more day.

Early Signs of Heroin Withdrawal

One of the most common signs of heroin withdrawal symptoms is the overwhelming urge to seek more.

If your drug-seeking behaviors keep you from completing tasks, working, or spending time with family and friends, you are likely addicted. If your drug cravings make you act out-of-character, these are clear signs that you will face more heroin withdrawal symptoms soon.

However, hope is not lost. You do not have to live with your withdrawal symptoms, drug cravings, or drug-seeking behaviors. Our comprehensive addiction programs help you overcome obstacles such as these.

Heroin Withdrawal Symptoms

Heroin withdrawal symptoms are more physical than psychological.

These symptoms can be intense. In some cases, they may be severe. Severe symptoms are one reason why medical professionals do not recommend users try to stop abruptly on their own.

Our high-level monitored, and professionally run drug detox programs handle situations like this. Heroin withdrawal symptoms can occur as soon as within a few hours after your last use.

Some of the most common ones may include:

  • Restlessness
  • Bone and muscle pain
  • Insomnia
  • Vomiting or diarrhea
  • Cold flashes
  • Leg twitches

Drug cravings are the symptom that most often lead to relapse.

The extent and severity of your withdrawal symptoms may vary depending on different individual factors. For example, factors such as the duration you have been using, the amount of the substance you usually intake, and the ingestion method you use can impact your detox process.

Whichever withdrawal symptoms you experience, we will be by your side to help you through them. If necessary, we may use certain approved and professionally administered medications to ease your withdrawal symptoms and help you to feel stronger in a quicker time period.

How to Cope with Heroin Withdrawal Symptoms 

If you are wondering how to cope with heroin withdrawal symptoms, you are not alone. Withdrawal symptoms are a problem that thousands of individuals face each year. Heroin withdrawal symptoms lead many people to relapse or avoid quitting altogether for fear of what will happen.

But taking back control of your life from your heroin addiction is worth the effort. And we will walk you through the process. Our medical detox will help ease your heroin withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings to pave the way to a smooth recovery.

Our comprehensive and customized treatment programs will help you evaluate and address temptations, triggers, and unhealthy thought patterns and behaviors. We help you flip these into healthier, more positive thoughts and actions.

You do not have to face your heroin withdrawal symptoms or your addiction alone. We are here to help every step of the way.

Heroin Rehab Options

Overcoming your heroin withdrawal symptoms is the start of your recovery. Long-term sobriety and health require long-term efforts. And remaining in treatment for the appropriate amount of time gives you the tools and resources you need to avoid relapse.

However, please know that you are not alone if you do relapse. Many people relapse each day. Addiction is a chronic and controlling disease. It takes a dedicated effort and a strong, supportive team for lasting success.

Chronic addiction is one reason why we offer such a wide variety of addiction treatment options.

Your customized addiction treatment will likely start with an assisted detox to rid yourself of the heroin in your body.

Inpatient and outpatient treatment programs are two of the most common rehab options. With an addiction as intense and overwhelming as heroin can be, inpatient treatment programs are often better. These provide 24-hour access to care, support, and guidance.

However, not everyone can commit to a full-time program. In these instances, we offer outpatient support, aftercare services, intensive outpatient programs, and more to fill in the gaps.

We work with you to determine the care methods and programs that best fulfill your needs.

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Paying for Heroin Rehab

Paying for heroin detox and rehab may be easier than you might think.

Most major health insurance providers offer coverage for addiction health treatments. Your provider may offer full or partial coverage for the services you are seeking.

If you are unsure of your plan’s coverage, please call our admissions department. Someone is available 24/7 to review and verify your insurance for you. The process is fast, free, and easy.

North Jersey Recovery Center

Heroin is an addictive and dangerous drug.

But your heroin withdrawal symptoms will only continue to control your life if you let them.

The best time to change your life is this very moment.

Why wait another day to overcome your heroin addiction?

We give you access to the resources, training, therapies, and support you need to move forward instead of dwelling in the past.

All you have to do is make the call.

How Long Do Opioids Stay in Your System? North Jersey Recovery Center - A young woman is speaking with an addiction therapist and asking, "How long do opiates stay in your system?" while reviewing her options for treatment to break free from opioid addiction.

How Long Do Opioids Stay in Your System?

How Long Do Opiates Stay in Your System?

How long do opiates stay in your system, and what affects this? These are common questions from many individuals struggling with opioid addiction.

The short answer is it depends.

Both opioids and opiates affect the brain and body similarly, but there are different types. For example, there are prescription opioids and illegal opioids.

The type of opioid or opiate and how it is used impacts how long it stays in your system.

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What are Opioids?

First, what are opioids? Opioids are a class of drugs that include heroin, which is illegal. This drug class also includes synthetic opioids, such as fentanyl.

Pain medications available by prescription are also opioids. Prescription pain relievers include oxycodone, hydrocodone, morphine, and codeine.

Opioids and opiates are effective as short-term pain relievers, but they are very addictive. Opioid addiction has led to the so-called opioid epidemic. Tens of thousands of people die each year due to opioid overdoses.

While there are different types of opioids, all affect certain receptors in the brain and body.

Along with pain relief, opioids can cause drowsiness, nausea, and constipation.

They can also cause euphoria, known as being high.

When exploring the question of how long do opiates stay in your system, it’s best to break them down into categories. The general categories for reference are prescription opioids, fentanyl, and heroin.

What Factors Affect How Long Opiates Stay in Your System?

Most opiates have short half-lives. Relatively speaking, this means they leave the system quickly.

However, the effects can last for hours.

When answering, “How long do opiates stay in your system?” individual factors play a role.

Some factors that influence how long opiates stay in your system include:

  • Your body weight and mass
  • Your metabolism
  • How much body fat you have
  • Liver and kidney health
  • How you used the drug
  • How often you use opiates
  • Age
  • Drug quality
  • How much water you have in your body

How Long Do Pain Pills Stay in Your System?

Prescription opioids are used to treat moderate-to-severe pain. For years, they were very widely prescribed.

There have been efforts recently to curb how often they’re prescribed because of the opioid epidemic. Prescription pain pills are linked to addiction, dependence, and overdoses. Even if someone takes opioids as prescribed, there’s an abuse or addiction potential.

Hydrocodone is one example of a prescription opioid. If you were to take hydrocodone orally in the form of a pill, it must first pass through the digestive system. It takes longer to feel the effects of opioids used orally. It also takes longer for them to leave your system.

While hydrocodone or oxycodone’s effects might wear off in three or four hours, that doesn’t mean the substance is still not in your system. In some cases, the drug could show up in certain tests anywhere from one to four days.

For example, how long do opiates stay in urine? Opiates can show up in urine tests for up to four days after someone uses them, despite the effects that have long since worn off.

A saliva test may be able to detect prescription pills for up to 48 hours after use.

Hair tests can detect use for up to 90 days.

Blood test detection for prescription pain pills can appear for up to 12 hours after someone takes them.

It is important to note that these are just estimates. Some prescription opiates are longer-lasting and have a longer half-life. Similarly, some are shorter-lasting.

How Long Does Heroin Stay in Your System?

When asking how long opioids stay in your system, you may be curious about heroin as well.

Heroin is typically injected instead of being ingested orally. Heroin has a much shorter half-life than other prescription opioids. The half-life is around 30 minutes. This means if you take a dose of heroin, it will take 30 minutes for your body to flush out half of the drug.

There have been studies showing the half-life could be as short as a few minutes. This can impact how it shows up on a drug test, but more advanced testing systems are being developed with increased sensitivity.

For most people, heroin might not show up in their urine after two days, but some tests will appear positive for up to seven days after heroin is used.

Due to the short half-life, it’s not common for blood or saliva tests to be used to screen for heroin.

How Long Does Fentanyl Stay in Your System?

Fentanyl is one of the most powerful synthetic opioids. The potency makes it incredibly dangerous. Fentanyl is available as a prescription under brand names like Actiq and Duragesic.

It is also sold illegally on the black market. Fentanyl’s potency is estimated to be anywhere from 50 to 100 times that of morphine.

Depending on the type of fentanyl someone uses and how they use it, it can stay in the system or at least be detected for up to four days after use. A blood test might show fentanyl use anywhere from five to 48 hours after the last use. A urine test could show fentanyl for up to three days after it is used.

Treatment for Opiate or Opioid Addiction

Even when someone takes opiates or opioids as prescribed, there is a significant potential for addiction. Your doctor should go over this with you.

You have to be careful to follow the dosage and prescription instructions with opiates or opioids.

These drugs affect your brain by binding to opioid receptor sites. In doing so, they trigger feelings of euphoria. That euphoria, in turn, activates a reward response in your brain. The reward response is what leads to addiction.

If you are addicted to opioids, your use is out of your control. It’s compulsive use that characterizes addiction to any substance.

Addiction treatment is available.

Treatment options for opiate or opioid addiction include:

  • Medical Detox: When you use opioids regularly, you can become dependent on them. If you stop suddenly, withdrawal symptoms may occur. During medical detox, you receive supervision and clinical care while you go through withdrawal.
  • Inpatient Treatment: Inpatient treatment is also known as residential rehab. You live onsite at a treatment facility for weeks or months based on your level of addiction and needs. The environment is safe and supportive. Triggers are eliminated so that you can focus on recovery.
  • Outpatient Treatment: This is a broad term. Outpatient treatment can be intensive and very similar to inpatient treatment, except you spend your nights at home. It can also be therapy or meeting with your counselor once a week.
  • Relapse Prevention: Your relapse prevention plan is what you enact after treatment. Relapse prevention plans might include participating in group or individual therapy. Recovery support groups are also often part of relapse prevention.

If you would like to learn more about opioid addiction treatment, please reach out to North Jersey Recovery Center today.

Our compassionate, clinically-trained team can verify your insurance and answer any questions you may have.

What are the Takeaways?

The question of how long do opiates stay in your system depends on your body and health, the type of opiate, and how you use it.

In general, they can stay in your system anywhere from a few hours to a few days.

Even though you might not feel the effects of an opioid any longer, it can still show up in tests, such as blood or urine tests.

Speedball Abuse and Recovery - North Jersey Recovery Center - A needle with heroin sits on top of a small pile of cocaine used to make a speedball to inject.

Speedball Abuse and Recovery

What is a Speedball?

A speedball is a mixture of heroin and cocaine, which is taken intravenously or by insufflation.

Heroin and cocaine are illicit drugs that produce opposite effects from one another.

Heroin is an opioid that produces a sense of euphoria while slowing the body down.

It reduces heart rate and decreases breathing.

Heroin and Cocaine – The Effects

Heroin can be felt almost immediately after administration and may last a few hours. Cocaine, on the other hand, is a stimulant that also creates a sense of euphoria.

It produces a sense of increased energy and focus.

Cocaine raises the heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature.

The effects of cocaine are usually felt within a few seconds and may last between five and 90 minutes.

Both drugs on their own are highly addictive and dangerous.

When heroin and cocaine are mixed to make a speedball, the drugs interact in the body to produce an intense rush of euphoria.

Speedball Abuse and Recovery is vital for anyone with a heroin addiction, and a drug rehab center offers the best chance of recovery.

Speedball Abuse and Recovery

Speedballs ignite activity in your opioid receptors and central nervous system.

They are popular because the stimulant (cocaine) cancels out the depressant’s unwanted side effects (heroin) and vice versa, leaving only the desired effects of both drugs.

However, this may be difficult to achieve, leading you to falsely believe you did not take enough or you have a high tolerance. You may feel compelled to take more speedball so that you can experience the intended recreational purpose.

That is how it is extremely easy to overdose and become lethal. 

You are also at a risk for many dangerous short-term and long-term effects, such as heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, cognitive impairment, respiratory failure, aneurysm, and damage to the heart, liver, and lungs.

Cocaine wears off faster than heroin, which means the effects of heroin may be more prominent as the time you administered the drug passes. 

Respiratory failure is fairly common when this occurs, even in small amounts of a speedball.

Factors such as the amount of drug administered, route of administration, purity of the drug, mental state, and medical history may determine your experience with speedballs.

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Effects of Speedball Abuse and Dependency

Speedballs can kill in a single-use. You are taking a significant risk every time you use this drug and will experience the signs of speedball abuse much quicker than other drugs.

This is due to the combination of the stimulant and depressant amplifying the effects. The abuse may easily and rapidly turn to dependence, which places you at extreme risk for death.

Signs of speedball abuse include confusion, drowsiness, paranoia, anxiety, impaired coordination, incoherence, and loss of consciousness. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you may have a dependency on speedballs. It is important to learn about speedball abuse and recovery.

This dependence leads to major impairments in all aspects of your life. Continued use of speedballs is a serious issue and will lead the body to shut down over time, ultimately resulting in death. Deaths related to speedball overdose have been increasing as the drug becomes more popular in many social circles, including celebrities and musicians.

It is important to seek professional help when attempting to stop using speedballs because withdrawals may result in long-term damage to the body, seizures, coma, and death.

Mental Illness and Speedballs

Approximately half the people with mental illness will abuse drugs to combat the overwhelming symptoms of mental illness.  This is only a short relief from their distress. Using speedballs covers up the true problem and creates more issues, such as further deterioration of your mental health and dangerous physical health problems. Speedball abuse and recovery is important to identify and get help for. 

If you know that you have a preexisting mental illness or illnesses, staying away from drugs is the safest thing to do.  Any psychoactive substance comes with its risks, especially in those with mental illness, who are more susceptible to adverse effects. 

Speedballs can exacerbate mania, depression, anxiety, delusions, auditory and visual hallucinations, psychosis, insomnia, and cognitive problems.  If you have a speedball abuse and dependency problem, you must know that help is available. 

There is always hope for a better future.

Treatment for Speedball Abuse and Dependency

Speedball dependency will take its toll and make you feel trapped.  But you must know that there is a way out and help is available for you.  You are not alone in this. 

Admitting to yourself that speedball dependency has caused many problems in your life and interferes with your ability to live life is the first step to recovery happily. It is a major step, and it is the best thing you can do to begin to reclaim your life.  This is a difficult time in your life, but that does not mean that it is over.  You can seek the help you need. 

Our highly trained staff is dedicated to helping you recover and being that support that you need at North Jersey Recovery Center. You can begin to take your life back from the grip of your dependency with professional and experienced staff who care.   There are many methods for treating speedball dependency and abuse. 

Every treatment is tailored to your needs because we place people first in our center.  It is best to receive inpatient care so that our staff may facilitate safe medical detoxification.  Inpatient detoxification is the first thing we will focus on, so we can ensure your body is cleansed from toxins. 

Medical detox may not be a pleasant experience because of withdrawal symptoms, but our caring staff makes it a top priority that you are as safe and comfortable as possible.  Once the drug has left your system, our treatment will focus on medication-assisted treatment, individual and group therapy, life-skills building exercises, social integration skills, art therapy, support systems, and relapse prevention. 

Please reach out to those who care at North Jersey Recovery Center if you are struggling with speedball dependency and abuse.

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Insurance for Heroin Addiction Treatment and Our Free Insurance Verification

Seeking treatment for your heroin addiction is the best move for your future.  No matter your situation, do not hesitate to contact us for further information. 

At our center, we provide honest and accurate pricing information for all of our treatment options.  We offer free insurance verification. 

Call us today to see if you qualify.

Call Us Today

Today can be the day you begin to break free from the despair of dependency.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, you come first.

You will be greeted with the care you deserve.

Our staff is dedicated to providing only the best treatment available.

Our recovery center understands and respects privacy.

With our location just outside Manhattan, you can receive treatment outside of the city.

Contact North Jersey Recovery Center today and begin living your life again.

How Much Do Drugs Cost: The Steep Price of Addiction North Jersey Recovery Center - An individual is buying drugs off of the street from a drug dealer and realizing how much he is spending on drugs on a daily basis based on a street drug prices chart.

How Much Do Drugs Cost: The Steep Price of Addiction

Street Drug Prices

Street drug prices are a common area of interest in communities where illicit drugs are common.

However, the cost of street drugs is not only financial and does not just impact the individual.

The abuse of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs costs over $740 billion annually.

This number includes costs related to criminal activities, lost work productivity, and addiction-related healthcare.

Drug abusers often face a multitude of costs, whether related to drug-seeking behaviors, crimes, lost wages, or out-of-pocket medical expenses.

But the physical and mental health costs may be the most troubling.

Our comprehensive rehab programs can help you combat these costs.

The Impact of Street Drug Costs

The financial burden for those struggling with drug addiction can be difficult to bear.

To get an idea of this financial burden, you can look at the street drug prices chart for commonly abused drugs.

This is particularly true for young adults who find themselves using drugs to cope with difficult home or family situations.

Recent studies have shown that anywhere from 40% to 70% of homeless youth abuse drugs or alcohol.

This percentage falls between two and three times higher than the rate among non-homeless individuals in the same age range.

For example, cocaine use is four to five times higher among the homeless than the non-homeless.

Similarly, amphetamine use is three to four times higher.

In this same survey, 71% of homeless youth participants met the criteria for substance abuse disorders, whether for alcohol or illicit drugs, or both.

Whether the homelessness or the addiction came first, the connection is there.

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How Much Does Heroin Cost?

Heroin is an illicit substance with no approved medical uses.

Because heroin is not available through prescription or on a drug store shelf, there is no set price or average price for heroin.

However, there are street drug prices charts you can research to give you an idea of the price range for the cost of heroin.

The form, quantity, location, and other factors can alter the cost of this illicit drug.

Heroin tends to be more affordable than many other illicit and prescription drugs.

But this affordability is only one factor of many to consider.

The costs it demands of your physical and mental health are much more significant than the financial costs.

Potent synthetic opioids like heroin and fentanyl are the most lethal category of illicit substances in the United States.

Drug overdoses, fatal and otherwise, occur at alarmingly high rates in this drug category. They outnumber deaths related to firearms, car accidents, suicides, and homicides each year.

But heroin and other synthetic opioids do not have to cost you your life.

We can help you regain control.

The Link Between Heroin and Prescription Opioids

Most heroin addicts did not start with heroin.

About 80% of heroin users report that they had abused prescription opioids first.

These two types of drugs offer many of the same side effects.

But heroin is stronger, more potent, and often more affordable.

When you abuse prescription opioids after receiving them following an injury, childbirth, or a dental procedure, they can quickly lose their effect.

After you have built a tolerance to prescription opioids, you may find yourself graduating to heroin to achieve the effects that have been lost over time with prescription painkillers.

The withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings that come with long-term heroin abuse can be even more difficult to overcome.

You may feel lost, scared, or helpless.

But we can help.

If you are addicted to heroin or prescription opioids, our medical detox eases your withdrawal symptoms and cravings to set you up for success.

Common Street Drugs and Street Drug Prices Chart

Adderall and meth are two common street drugs because they are generally easy to find and affordable.

Many drug abusers take Adderall to increase their focus and concentration.

These side effects make it a popular drug among younger demographics.

It has been nicknamed “the study drug,” but there is no evidence that Adderall use improves test scores or grade point averages.

Heroin, prescription opioids, benzodiazepines, and central nervous system stimulants are high on the list, as well.

Cocaine, hallucinogens, LSD, and marijuana are common among different demographics.

Whichever illicit substances you find yourself abusing, it is important to consider each of the costs, not just the financial ones.

Street drugs are often more dangerous than prescription drugs, but this depends on the individual and several other factors.

Among many others, one reason for this is that street drugs are often mixed with other substances. The drug dealer often does this without the user’s knowledge.

Adding fentanyl to heroin is a common example of this. Combinations like this one instantly increase your risk of overdosing.

Physical and Mental Costs of Abusing Drugs

The costs to your brain, body, career, and relationships are more impactful than the money you will spend to obtain these drugs.

The physical and mental health tolls that they take over time should be your number one priority.

Depending on a wide range of individual factors, like substances abused, the frequency and dose, and your height, weight, and family history, your side effects may range from mild to severe.

You may experience various side effects — from headaches to hand tremors to hallucinations to seizures.

Higher dosages, increased frequencies, polysubstance addictions, and addictions with underlying mental health disorders may each come with more severe side effects.

Many side effects of drug abuse involve worsening or developing mental health disorders.

If you are experiencing adverse side effects, contact your doctor or another medical professional as soon as possible.

If you are interested in seeking professional and high-level care before your side effects become worse, contact our facility.

We walk you through the steps involved in attending a drug rehab program, enforcing early sobriety, overcoming withdrawals, and everything that comes next.

Rehab Treatment Options

Depending on the specifics of your addiction, mental health, and other needs, we work with you to build a program that will best suit your needs.

Your customized care program will be as unique as you are.

These care programs combine proven therapeutic methods with comprehensive techniques for care, support, and guidance that are genuinely patient-focused.

Some of these program options may include:

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Paying for Addiction Treatments

The cost of treatment is a factor that keeps many people in need of professional help from seeking the addiction care they deserve.

But paying for addiction treatment may be easier than you would think.

If you have health insurance, your treatment may be partially or fully covered.

Most major health insurance providers offer coverage for these types of treatments to some degree.

If you are unsure what is covered under your policy, please call our admissions department.

They will review and verify your insurance for you.

If you are coming to us without health insurance, they can also outline alternative payment options.

North Jersey Recovery Center

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we help you work toward lasting sobriety for a healthier and happier life.

Our goal is to provide each person we meet with individualized, high-quality, and comfortable care.

See the difference that a dedicated team and proven therapeutic techniques can make.

You do not have to face your addiction alone. It is time to try things a better way.

Call us today for more information.

Snorting Oxycodone – Opioid Dependence - North Jersey Recovery Center - a pile of crushed oxy pills sits next to a bottle on its side with pills spilled out.

Snorting Oxycodone – Opioid Dependence

Can You Snort Oxycodone?

Snorting Oxycodone is a dangerous practice that often leads to opioid dependence.

Users perform this dangerous practice by first crushing their Oxycodone pills.

They do this because snorting the drug speeds up its effect on the central nervous system.

While the high is more intense than it would be after swallowing a pill, there is also an increased risk of overdose.

Snorting Percocet is a common practice, particularly among younger drug users.

In any of its forms, snorting Oxycodone is never a good idea.

If you are facing an addiction to Oxycodone, we can help.  

What is Oxycodone Normally Used for?

Oxycodone is a powerful prescription opiate that, when medically administered, is used to relieve moderate to severe pain.

It is an active ingredient in several prescription drugs, including OxyContin, Percocet, Percodan, and Tylox.

Oxycodone is more often referred to as one of its street names, like Roxy.

Many young drug users refer to this type of Oxycodone abuse as snorting Roxy.

Other street names for Oxycodone include Perc, Oxy, Ox, and Hillbilly Heroin.

When taken appropriately, Oxycodone can ease chronic pains and improve the quality of life for patients with cancer, arthritis, or severe injuries.

Illicit use of Oxycodone

But it is much more frequently used in illicit settings.

And its euphoric effects can be addicting, especially when abused. It is easy to build a chemical dependence on Oxycodone.

Snorting the substance only increases its risks. And when taken this way, its effects are similar to those of heroin. Oxycodone is a schedule II drug, according to the Drug Enforcement Agency.

While it has some approved medical uses, it carries a high risk of abuse and addiction.

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What Other Ways Can You Take Oxycodone?

Prescription painkiller misuse is the second most common form of illicit drug use in the United States. Snorting Oxycodone is one of the most dangerous ways to misuse this particular opioid.

Percocet is often the drug of choice. Snorting it allows it to pass through the lining in your nose and right into your bloodstream. It ensures that most of the drug starts to circulate through your system almost immediately.

Prescriptions for Oxycodone usually dictate swallowing the pill. This method is less dangerous and less likely to lead to addiction or overdose. Snorting Oxycodone is the most common abuse method.

Other users might mix Oxycodone with water to inject it or chew the pills to get them to kick in faster.

The Opioid Epidemic

Since the 1990s, prescription pain relievers and illicit opioids have turned the abuse of opioids into an epidemic. This epidemic has occurred in waves.

In the 1990s, before many medical professionals knew the true dangers of these pain relievers, opioids were prescribed in record-high numbers. Some experts suggest that we are still facing the impact of this unwise decision.

However, others point to the second wave of the opioid epidemic. In 2010, our focus shifted to the alarming rise in heroin-related deaths. Drug-induced overdoses related to both heroin and prescription painkillers were rising.

Studies revealed that up to 86% of respondents had used prescription opioids before trying heroin. And then, we saw what experts call the third wave of the opioid epidemic just a few short years later.

A drastic uptick drove this wave in deaths caused by potent synthetic opioids like fentanyl. The opioid epidemic is one of the most concerning modern health crises we have faced.

Opioid overdoses have impacted millions of American families over the last three decades. In 2018 alone, there were 46,802 opioid-related overdose deaths. Snorting Oxycodone heightens the risks associated with opioid abuse. But it does not have to be this way.

Side Effects of Snorting Oxycodone

Snorting Oxycodone is linked to a wide variety of troubling mental and physical health concerns. While the most pressing is the high correlation to overdose deaths, there are other complications to be aware of.

The short-term side effects of opioids include pain relief and feelings of relaxation and happiness. But other, more troubling side effects appear the longer you abuse opioids. Some of these harmful effects include:

  • Drowsiness
  • Confusion
  • Nausea
  • Constipation
  • Euphoria
  • Slowed breathing

Slowed breathing due to opioid misuse can cause a condition called hypoxia. Hypoxia occurs when too little oxygen is reaching your brain.

The short and long-term psychological and neurological effects of this condition can be fatal. These effects can also include coma and permanent brain damage.

Snorting Oxycodone is not worth the risks that are associated with it. Choose a better way to live. We can help you get there.

Recovering from Snorting Oxycodone

Depending on your addiction level, withdrawal symptoms, and other individual factors, we will work with you to build a customized treatment plan.

Our goal is to suit your individual needs, not recommend pre-planned treatment programs that we think will work for everyone. Each person and addiction is unique.

We offer a wide variety of treatment settings and methods to reflect individuality. Inpatient and outpatient treatments are two of the most common.

But we also offer intensive outpatient services, support group meetings, aftercare planning, and several other supplemental care settings.

What works best for one person may not necessarily work best for the next. We work with you to ensure that we provide the right types of care at the right times. We will not leave your recovery up to chance.

We will provide you with high-level, customized care throughout your recovery journey. If you are trying to stop snorting Oxycodone and fail, the solution may be right here at North Jersey Recovery Center.

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Insurance for Addiction Treatment

Many people who decide against seeking addiction treatments will cite the costs as the reason for their reluctance. But what many people do not know is that addiction health care is more affordable than you might think.

If you have health insurance, you may find that your treatments are partially or fully covered. Most major health insurance providers offer some extent of coverage.

If you are not sure of your plan coverage, please call our admissions specialist. They will review and confirm your coverage so that this step is out of the way. If you do not have insurance, ask about alternative payment options. Costs should not stand between you and a healthy, successful recovery. You deserve high-level, customized care, support, and guidance.  

North Jersey Recovery Center

If your goal this year has been to stop snorting Oxycodone, the dedicated experts at North Jersey Recovery Center can help.

We provide high-quality drug and alcohol addiction treatment that works.

We understand that addiction is a three-fold disease that affects you physically, spiritually, and mentally.

And by addressing each dimension of addiction, we can provide you with holistic, unique, and effective care.

Whether you need round-the-clock care, weekly check-ins, or something in between, we have a program available for you.

Help is right around the corner.

Call us today for more information.

Controlled Substances Act and Drug Scheduling North Jersey Recovery - Image of handcuffs, a spoon with white powder in it and a heroin needle.

Controlled Substances Act and Drug Scheduling

What to Know About Controlled Substances

Is alcohol a controlled substance? Is it covered in the Controlled Substances Act?

How are controlled substances classified, and what does the term mean?

These are all common questions people have.

In simplest terms, controlled substances refer to the addictive potential a substance has.

Not all addictive substances are controlled, however.

An Overview of Controlled Substances

Controlled substances are considered illicit drugs that can negatively affect someone’s health and well-being and are covered under the Controlled Substances Act.

If you have a controlled substance and you’re caught by law enforcement, you may face legal penalties, including fines or prison time.

The federal government classifies substances as controlled substances under the Controlled Substances Act of 1970.

There are five categories in the Controlled Substance Act, which are often related to the potential for substance abuse to occur.

These categories of controlled substance class are:

  • Schedule I: These substances are considered to have no acceptable medical use in the U.S. and high abuse potential. Examples of Schedule I controlled substances are ecstasy, marijuana, heroin, and LSD.
  • Schedule II: This controlled substance class includes stimulants and narcotics considered to have high abuse potential, but they have medical uses in the U.S. too. Schedule II substances include opioids like methadone, codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, and stimulants like amphetamine.
  • Schedule III: These substances have less of an abuse potential than substances classified as Schedule I or II, but there is still a risk of psychological and physical dependence. Schedule IV substances include ketamine, anabolic steroids, and medicines with low doses of codeine.
  • Schedule IV: A Schedule IV controlled substance is one with a lower abuse potential than I-III substances. Schedule IV substances include benzodiazepines like Xanax and many prescription sleep aids.
  • Schedule V: A Schedule V drug has a low potential for abuse. Most Schedule V drugs contain a small amount of narcotics, such as cough syrup with codeine.

It is technically illegal to possess any controlled substance, but if you have a prescription and lawfully purchased one, you are exempt from this law.

The government regulates controlled substances because of their addictive and harmful potential effects in manufacturing, distribution, possession, and use.

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Is Alcohol a Controlled Substance?

The brief answer is no; alcohol is not a controlled substance under the Controlled Substances Act. With that being said, alcohol still has a high potential for abuse and addiction. Alcohol is one of the most commonly abused substances around the world.

While alcohol isn’t a controlled substance, it is a regulated one. There are laws regarding the use of alcohol. For example, the legal age to drink alcohol is 21, and you cannot legally drink and drive.

Abuse of Controlled Substances

Since controlled substances are considered to be inherently addictive, they are frequently abused. Opioids are one example of a highly abused controlled substance.

There are both Schedule I and II opioids that are drugs of abuse. Schedule I opioids include heroin, which is entirely illegal. Schedule II opioids include prescription pain relievers. Often, since something is prescribed, there is a misconception that it is somehow safe or not harmful.

Prescription opioids prove otherwise. In addition to being highly addictive, prescription opioids can also lead to fatal overdoses. Some people who abuse prescription opioids they eventually move to other more dangerous types of opioids like heroin or fentanyl.

What starts as legitimate use can spiral into problematic opioid use very quickly.

Mental Illness and Controlled Substances

There are links between mental illnesses and the use of controlled substances. For some people, the use of controlled substances may stem from an attempt to self-medicate and deal with symptoms of anxiety, depression, or other mental health conditions. Controlled substances can also contribute to mental illness.

The links between controlled substances and mental illness are a big reason why addiction treatment relies on therapy. Therapy can be in both a group and individual setting, and it’s a key part of relapse prevention.

Treatment for Abuse of Controlled Substances

If someone is struggling with controlled substance abuse, treatment is available. Treatment can happen in different settings and formats. What is most important is that rehab is personalized to the individual.

The following are some of the types of programs that can treat an addiction to controlled substances.

Medical Detox

When someone regularly uses controlled substances such as opioids, they can become dependent on them. If you’re dependent on a substance and stop using it suddenly, it can cause withdrawal symptoms.

Withdrawal symptoms can range from mild to severe, depending on how long you used the substance, how heavily, and your overall health. Medical detox provides a clinical environment as you go through withdrawal. This can keep you safe and support you.

If necessary, you may receive medications to lessen the symptoms of withdrawal you experience.

Inpatient Rehab

There are varying intensities of inpatient rehab. These programs can last for 28 days, up to several months or more. The commonality between inpatient rehab programs is that you live onsite during your treatment. This helps you leave behind your environment of substance abuse and be in a supportive environment.

You can focus entirely on your recovery in inpatient treatment. Inpatient treatment can also include different types of complementary treatments that help you holistically.

Outpatient Rehab

Outpatient treatment may be a step down from inpatient care, or if you have a mild or short-term addiction to a controlled substance or alcohol, you could do the outpatient treatment.

Outpatient treatment allows you to work on your sobriety and recovery but continue living at home and keeping up with daily responsibilities. Some outpatient treatment programs require a significant time commitment, while others are fairly limited and informal.

Outpatient rehab can also be something you participate in for an extended time as you re-enter your daily life.

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Can You Use Insurance for Rehab?

If you’re considering rehab for a controlled substance, alcohol, or perhaps both, there are payment options available. At North Jersey Recovery Center, we can likely work with your insurance company.

We can verify your coverage for free, which will help you financially plan for your treatment.

Our admissions team can also help you explore other payment options if needed. Above all else, getting the help you need and deserve should be a priority.

Is Alcohol a Controlled Substance? Final Thoughts

The answer to “is alcohol a controlled substance” is no, but that does not make alcohol any less dangerous or addictive.

Controlled substances include prescription and illicit drugs. Alcohol is a regulated but not controlled substance in the U.S.

Controlled substances addiction and alcohol addiction can occur separately from one another or together.

If you would like to learn more about addiction treatment, reach out to North Jersey Recovery Center.

We offer tailored, effective treatment programs in a serene, private setting.

Addicted to Heroin on First Try New Jersey Recovery Center - A man is trying heroin for the first time, which will likely result in a lifetime addiction as you can become addicted to heroin on your very first try

Addicted to Heroin on the First Try

Can you Get Addicted to Heroin on the First Try?

Yes! Heroin is a chemical that works indirectly on dopamine (the feel-good chemical) in the brain.

This feeling of artificial pleasure and happiness is imprinted on the brain.

Our Bodies Recreate Things That Feel Good

Our bodies are designed to recreate things that feel good, leading the body to want this intense euphoria more.

Addiction describes a process of thinking and acting in order to obtain more of something repeatedly regardless of consequences.

The desire to consistently use heroin and work to obtain it for regular use can begin with a single exposure.

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Understanding Heroin Use

Can you get addicted to drugs on your first try? Yes, dependence on heroin can build quickly. After the first use, the brain almost immediately wants more.

The second and third uses may not create the same level of happiness as the first time, however.

As a result, you may be tempted to use more heroin.

This process is called tolerance, and it increases the desire to use more heroin in order to reach that high. The hard truth is that your first high may never successfully be reached again.

Fatal Overdoses are the End Result of This Chase

Many fatal overdoses are the end result of this chase.

What can North Jersey Recovery do to help someone who is addicted to heroin?

Addiction is formally defined by the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) as “a treatable, chronic medical disease involving complex interactions among brain circuits, genetics, the environment, and an individual’s life experiences.

People with addiction use substances or engage in behaviors that become compulsive and often continue despite harmful consequences.

Addiction has been described as a process of losing hope.

It can be very challenging to determine when abuse moves to addiction.

If drug use creates problems, then professional treatment may be necessary.

Addiction to heroin requires both medical and addiction specialists to obtain recovery and restore hope.

North Jersey Recovery has a collective experience of over 50 years treating various drug addictions in people from all walks of life.

A healthy life is possible.

Effects of Heroin on Behavior

Drug abuse can alter behaviors – making it difficult to “find” the person that existed before heroin use started. So, can you get addicted to drugs on your first try? Yes, you can, and the effects can be detrimental.

Some examples of behavior change from drug abuse are:

  • Hallucinations
  • Aggression
  • Impulsiveness
  • Rambling or rapid speech
  • Inability to make decisions
  • Paranoia
  • Loss of self-control
  • Secretive or unexplained activity

Behaviors can be the most significant indicator of whether or not addiction is present. The consequences of addictive behaviors can be far-reaching and damaging.

There is evidence that drug abuse can be contagious within families. Behavior from heroin abuse can be dangerous not only for the user but for young family members.

From 2014-2017, the United States experienced a decrease in life expectancy partially due to drug abuse. The increase in mortality was seen in young and middle-aged adults with illicit drug abuse as the suspected cause. Heroin use is dangerous, unpredictable, and can easily result in an unexpected death.

The effects of heroin use can be seen in every area of a loved one’s life. Treatment is essential to stop the damaging impacts of addiction and to move towards health and stability.

Reaching out for help when you or a loved one’s heroin use has gotten out of hand is the first step towards healing.

Learning more about the cycle of addiction and healthy coping mechanisms are necessary for a more stable and joyful life.

Mental Illness and Heroin Use

Are mental illness and heroin use related? Can you get addicted to drugs on your first try?

In over half of all heroin addicts, the answer is yes. Having a mental illness, such as depression or anxiety, can make you more vulnerable to the effects of heroin. At times, heroin use can be used to self-medicate an existing mental health issue.

An undiagnosed mental condition can lead to attempts to feel better by using other external illegal substances. Treating the underlying condition can help relieve the desire to search for relief. Thus, treating both mental health and addiction is vital for long term recovery.

As tolerance develops and addiction grows, the effects of heroin can produce new mental health issues that complicate the addiction.

It is crucial to screen for these in all cases of heroin addiction. Half of the time, a mental health issue will be discovered, and treatment can be initiated.

Treating both at the same time has been proven to be more effective than treating each individually.

At Resurgence, we identify all causes of addiction and underlying mental illnesses to improve coping skills and support recovery.

Treatment of Heroin Addiction

Can you get addicted to drugs on your first try? Yes.

If you or a loved one is suffering from an addiction to heroin, we are here to help.

At North Jersey Recovery, we use an integrated approach to heal and recover. We have over 50 years of experience breaking the cycle of addiction and shame.

Heroin rehab is not a short process, but it is possible. Simply stopping drug use is not recovery.

Learning about addiction, treating underlying issues, and building healthy coping mechanisms are all a part of our approach to lasting recovery.

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Heroin Addiction Treatment at North Jersey Recovery

We will work with you to determine your individual goals for treatment and customize treatment to your needs.

Heroin rehab requires a team approach, including safe medical detox, counseling, therapy, and inpatient treatment, followed by outpatient treatment. We are here to walk through this process with you.

Even if the situation appears hopeless or there is resistance to change, treatment can still be effective. Once the fog of addiction and medical detox clear many are happy to receive treatment.

We can help. Give us a call today to discuss your specific needs and requirements.

National Recovery Month - New Jersey Recovery Center

National Recovery Month – Education & Celebration

With September being recognized as National Recovery Month, it is a time to reflect on the gains that individuals who have previously struggled with addiction and mental health issues have made in their journeys to recovery.

In addition, it is also a time to spread awareness on the extreme impacts that drug and alcohol addiction and mental health disorders have on millions of individuals worldwide. In fact, many people suffer from what is known as a dual diagnosis, where they may turn to addictive substances or unhealthy behaviors due to mental health disorders they are struggling with.

For the loved ones of those struggling with addiction, education is key to provide sufficient support and resources during their treatment process.

Celebrating Connections for 2020’s National Recovery Month

Often, there is a stigma that comes along with the word “addiction”. This is one of the reasons why September was designated as National Recovery Month over 20 years ago – to break this stigma and educate the public on the various aspects of addiction and mental health.

Celebrating Connections is this year’s theme for 2020’s National Recovery Month in order to emphasize the importance of both support systems and spread awareness for addiction, abuse, and mental health disorders.

As part of National Recovery Month, there are four key components surrounding aspects of awareness that remain focal points:

  • Behavioral – When you think of wellness, most people tend to think of their physical well-being. However, mental health and behavioral health are a critical part of one’s overall health and well-being. This includes aspects such as psychological and emotional well-being as well. Many times, people will turn to addictive substances or harmful behaviors to deal with their declining behavioral wellness.
  • Prevention – In order to prevent alcohol and drug abuse or addiction, it is essential that individuals are educated and informed on the various addictions, disorders, treatments, and programs. This allows a person to make an educated decision on what his or her next steps may be based on factual information and evidence-based studies and research.
  • Treatment – Initially, those struggling in these areas were hesitant to seek treatment because of the negative stigma with addiction and mental health disorders. However, over the recent years and advancements made within treatment programs, more and more individuals are getting the help they need to live an addiction-free life. Each individual has a different treatment plan based on his or her needs and requirements. These success-driven treatment plans are created by professional, licensed, and experienced rehabilitation facilitators.
  • Recovery – There is no doubt that treatment works when the commitment and effort are there. Millions of individuals all over the U.S. have grown to live a healthy life of sobriety after completing their respective treatment program and following any aftercare, such as outpatient programs, group meetings, counseling, and so on.
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The Importance of Recovery

The organization Faces & Voices of Recovery is a non-profit that advocates for recovery and treatment.

They have put together a website that provides a range of tools and resources for users to download in support of National Recovery Month.

With the pandemic that has completely shaken up the world this year, recovery is now more important than ever. Increased use of drugs and alcohol has significantly climbed due to COVID-19 with more people stuck at home – potentially causing an uptake in urges and triggers to use. Because of this, loved ones must be able to provide effective support for those struggling with addiction and mental health disorders.

We are also seeing an increase in substance abuse and mental health issues with teenagers and adolescents in the U.S. It is crucial that the public is well-informed on the dangers of addiction and undiagnosed mental health disorders, so we can do our part to support our youth and prevent further harm from occurring.

By spreading awareness on addiction and mental health, we are helping to break the stigma for those that require inpatient treatment or outpatient treatment to improve their quality of life.

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You Have Our Support & Encouragement

No one should have to go through addiction alone.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we are here for you no matter what type of struggles you may be dealing with. Whether you are located in Manhattan, New York City, Newark, Clifton, or the surrounding areas. If you are looking for an addiction treatment center in the Northeast, we are here and ready to help as we take in those struggling with addiction from all over the United States.

If you or a loved one is struggling with heroin, cocaine, pills, alcohol, or another type of substance addiction, our professional team of rehab facilitators offers a clinical approach to help you during your path of recovery. Give us a call today at 800-741-3300.

From group sessions to one-on-one counseling to proper medication, we are here to provide you with the support and resources you need to regain control of your life.

Let treatment do its job and help you move on to a better, healthier, and happier life.