Say No to Alcohol and Energy Drinks

Mixing Alcohol with Energy Drinks: Exploring the Many Dangers of this Combination

In 2017, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that more than 10% of adolescents drank energy drinks and alcohol, some even as young as 12 years of age. Alcohol and energy drinks are immensely popular in the United States, especially among adolescents. This is concerning because alcohol mixed with energy drinks can result in harmful consequences as well as legal troubles. 

There are a vast number of reasons that alcohol and energy drinks should not be mixed; these sorts of consequences should not be taken lightly. Some of this is because it is a mixture of stimulants and depressants, but there are many more reasons than this.

What’s Dangerous About Mixing Alcohol and Energy Drinks?

Mixing-Alcohol-with-Energy-Drinks-300x200Alcohol and energy drinks have been beverages people mix for centuries (not referring to the vodka and Red Bull cocktail). Coffee and alcohol have been popular cocktails for quite some time; while others may not believe coffee to be an energy drink, it technically is. Coffee has a concentrated amount of caffeine, and numerous studies have proven that the combination of alcohol and caffeine can be deadly.

Stimulants and depressants are substances that should not be mixed and for good reason. The two don’t mix well in the slightest. Depressants like alcohol slow down the body’s functions and impair judgment severely. Conversely, stimulants speed things up. 

Effects of Depressants

Some effects of depressants include the following:

  • Heightened sense of euphoria
  • Increased confidence
  • Feelings of relaxation
  • Friendliness
  • Feelings of Nausea
  • Drowsiness
  • Heightened mood

Effects of Stimulants

Some of the effects of stimulants include the following:

  • Excitedness
  • Euphoria
  • Paranoia
  • Restlessness
  • Irritability

Binge Drinking and Energy Drinks

When it comes to combining energy drinks with alcohol, the combination can be deadly; this is especially true when someone is binge drinking. When someone mixes energy drinks with alcohol they’re more likely to start binge drinking, but what exactly is binge drinking, and why is it a huge risk?

What is Binge Drinking?

Binge drinking is when someone consumes more than six drinks in one sitting. However, it’s different for men than it is for women. For men, on average, it’s five or six, and for women, it’s somewhere around four drinks. The most discouraging part of all of this is that younger people are four times more likely to binge drink with an energy drink than without. Those who participate in this behavior report more harm to their bodies than those who don’t; this could include injuries, unprotected sex, and drunk driving.

How Do Alcohol and Energy Drinks Affect Young People in America?

How-Do-Alcohol-and-Energy-Drinks-Affect-Young-PeopleThe stigma behind the effects of alcoholism influences many to believe that only adults suffer from alcoholism. However, this is quite the contrary. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) has done studies that show reports that suggest something that may be completely counter to what some may believe. According to them, underage drinking, especially underage drinking of alcohol mixed with energy drinks is a massive problem. 

By way of example, 25% of young people between 14 and 15 years of age had one full drink in 2019. That same year, Americans ages 12 to 20 drank more than two or three sips of alcohol in one sitting. Not only this but according to the CDC, mixing alcohol and energy drinks is particularly dangerous for youth in America. 

The CDC has referenced some studies concerning young people who partake in underage drinking; this particular study focused on young people drinking while attending high school in Michigan. Those who were binge drinking wound up being two times more likely to mix energy drinks and alcohol; those who didn’t were 20% likely to mix alcohol and energy drinks.

The Dangers of Drinking Alcohol

Some of the dangers of drinking alcohol at a young age include the following:

  • Poor brain development
  • Educational struggles
  • The trouble with the law
  • Prone to physical assault
  • Prone to sexual assault
  • Death

When it comes to the dangers of drinking alcohol, it’s more dangerous for those who are under age than it is for those who are of age. There have been studies conducted that have shown individuals are more likely to develop an addiction to alcohol if they start drinking before the age of 15. 

The Deceptive Perception of Alcohol and Energy Drinks


Given every ad for alcohol and energy drinks ever, it’s safe to say these substances are deceptive. More specifically, some products line the shelves of convenience stores that identify themselves as both alcohol and energy drinks. For example, many are familiar with Four Loko, a tall can of energy drink/alcohol hybrid. These cans are packaged colorfully with an assortment of different flavors to appeal to younger people. 

When it comes to these types of drinks, pop culture icons are usually the ones who strike deals to sell them. The marketing campaigns are all centered around a fun/hip time in efforts to convince a young demographic that all of what they see can be theirs as well. All the while the true intention is to attract young individuals.

This, however, is where the federal government stepped in, and it was for the better. The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) shifted their focus toward these beverages. The government sent out warning letters in late 2010, warning individuals about the dangers of this particular substance.

What Did The Government Say About Alcoholic Energy Drinks?

Energy-Drinks-and-Alcohol-300x200In these letters that the federal government sent out regarding alcoholic energy drinks, it was written that this particular combination was deceptively safe. These drinks were being sold throughout the United States and in the government’s eyes were quite unsafe. Their response? They encouraged consumers to protect those who didn’t understand the dangers of the effects of these beverages.

Companies like Four Loko wound up removing caffeine, guarana, and taurine from their products. This made things a lot safer for consumers (although not completely safe, as these beverages contained the alcohol content of five beers.

What Kind of Alcohol and Energy Drinks Should I Avoid?

When it comes to alcohol and energy drinks, people should always stay away from combining the two. Any combination of alcoholic beverages and stimulants should be avoided. That’s not to say that some combinations aren’t more intense than others, but the fact remains that it should be avoided at all costs.

It’s worth mentioning that a drink with a high alcohol percentage will have more influence on someone than an alcoholic beverage with low alcohol content. While that may seem like an obvious statement (because it is) it serves the purpose of explaining the fact that a drink with lower amounts of alcohol and caffeine are safer (not safe, but safer). 

The best thing to do when it comes to drinking alcohol and energy drinks is to just stay away. Staying abstinent from alcohol and energy drinks is perhaps the safest course of action to take; if you aren’t drinking, you’re not going to suffer the consequences of drinking. Occupying one’s time differently may prove to save one’s own life. 

What Can I Drink Instead of Alcohol or Energy Drinks?

Drinking is a pastime people have enjoyed since well before the common era. In the modern-day world, drinking is glorified and a part of culture wherever you go. Peer pressure is one of the most difficult parts of saying no to drinking, but this doesn’t mean you still can’t have fun. There are plenty of ways to opt-out of drinking while still having a good time.

Many individuals at a party will opt out of a drink if they are trying to maintain their sobriety; however, just because you’re not drinking alcohol doesn’t mean you can’t make something fun without it. Many people who attend parties without drinking alcohol pursue options that are more safe, like mocktails (drinks that taste like an adult beverage but have no alcohol content). Some of the more popular ones include virgin piña coladas.

Some mocktails include the following:

  • Cold-brew and Mai Tai mocktail
  • Mint Mojito and iced coffee mocktail
  • Redbull and seltzer water
  • Green tea mocktail

There are a plethora of different options that well-versed bartenders would be delighted to make for those who are trying to stay sober. Whether it’s a green tea mocktail or a Red Bull and seltzer water, there are plenty of safer options. Though there’s always immense pressure to partake, abstaining from and considering alternatives to alcohol and energy drinks are something to take pride in.

Say No to Alcohol and Energy Drinks

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we want to be 100% certain that those who need help receive it. Whether it’s through inpatient treatment, detox, or simply educational insight on the dangers of alcoholic energy drinks, you can rest assured that we’re doing the best we can to help you. Not only that but when you come through the doors of our facility, we want you to be sure that you are receiving the utmost quality care. If you or a loved one need assistance, contact us today.

Alcohol Poisoning

Common Signs and Symptoms of Alcohol Poisoning

According to the Surgeon General’s Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health, there are 88,000 deaths each year related to alcohol. More than that, one-tenth of deaths among working adults are also related to alcohol. Recognizing the signs and symptoms of alcohol poisoning can potentially save lives. 

Alcohol poisoning is one of the reasons how alcohol is responsible for so many deaths in the United States each year. Since it’s legal, it’s easy for society to undermine the dangers of it as a whole, even though it’s a drug. Yet, in 2015, 15.7 million people were admitted to addiction treatment centers for an alcohol use disorder. That is likely a small portion of all the Americans that need help with alcoholism. 

The truth of the matter is that people who receive treatment for alcoholism are lucky; many people die as a result of alcohol poisoning, even if they don’t have an alcohol use disorder. Around 66 million Americans over the age of 12 engaged in binge drinking in 2015. This can directly lead to alcohol poisoning. It’s important to get help for an alcohol addiction before this happens. 

What Is Alcohol Poisoning? 

Common-Signs-and-Symptoms-of-Alcohol-PoisoningThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that approximately six people died every day between 2010 and 2012 from alcohol poisoning. Alcohol poisoning is exactly what it sounds like: drinking so much in a little amount of time to the point that it acts as a poison. A high blood/breath alcohol content can depress breathing, heart rate, temperature, and other vital systems in the body. 

When someone is experiencing alcohol poisoning, getting help quickly can be the difference between life and death. This can happen to both young and old people. However, it disproportionately affects Americans ages 35 to 64. Also, around 76% of people suffering from alcohol poisoning are men.  

What Leads To Alcohol Poisoning? 

Again, alcohol poisoning is a result of drinking too much. More specifically, when a person has a BAC of 0.250-0.399%, they will typically experience alcohol poisoning. Of course, a BAC above this level will lead to alcohol poisoning.

Binge drinking is one of the lead causes of alcohol poisoning. It’s when a man has five drinks or more in one hour or a woman has four drinks or more in one hour. However, it can also be applied to an excessive amount of drinking at a single event over multiple hours. Additionally, alcohol poisoning can happen when a person intentionally or unintentionally drinks items with alcohol in it (like rubbing alcohol). 

What Factors Increase the Risk of Symptoms of Alcohol Poisoning?

Mixing alcohol and drugs is one way to increase the risk of negative repercussions for drinking alcohol. For instance, alcohol is a depressant. If someone consumes a stimulant it could mask the effect of how drunk someone is. As a result, they continue to drink and ultimately suffer from alcohol poisoning. 

What Are Common Symptoms of Alcohol Poisoning? 

Sometimes drinking too much alcohol can mimic common signs of alcohol poisoning. Those around someone who has drunk too much may dismiss his or her symptoms as just that. However, dismissing these symptoms could leave alcohol poisoning untreated. 

For this reason, it’s extremely important to be aware of the symptoms and signs of alcohol poisoning: Signs-and-Symptoms-of-Alcohol-Poisoning-

  • Seizures 
  • Vomiting 
  • Confusion 
  • Loss of motor coordination 
  • Inability to wake up after losing consciousness
  • Breathing much slower than usual (less than eight breaths per minute) 
  • Breathing irregularly (only breathing every 10 seconds or more) 
  • Irregular skin color (ie: blue-tinged, grey-tinged, or pale skin)
  • Irregularly low body temperature indicative of hypothermia 

Any of these symptoms alone could be a sign of alcohol poisoning, even if it’s just falling asleep or vomiting. A combination of these signs most likely means a person is experiencing alcohol poisoning. Neglecting to get help can result in serious consequences. 

Why Are Symptoms of Alcohol Poisoning So Dangerous?

Alcohol poisoning is so dangerous in part because alcohol is a depressant drug. Consuming too much of a depressant drug can depress the body’s systems too much as a whole. The respiratory system is one of the body’s systems that can be lethally affected by drinking too much. 

When people experience alcohol poisoning, they can stop breathing. It can also make them fall into a coma. So, if an individual falls into a coma and isn’t hospitalized in time, they could stop breathing and die as a result. Not to mention that excessive vomiting can result in deadly dehydration. Plus, a person can vomit in a coma, choke on it, and die. With this, alcohol poisoning can even result in permanent brain damage. 

Recognize Symptoms of Alcohol Poisoning? Get Help!  

Peers of those who are suffering from signs of alcohol poisoning might be reluctant to seek medical help. One reason why is that they may be underage. Both the peer and the person suffering from alcohol poisoning might be scared about the legal repercussions surrounding what might happen if they get help for drinking when they’re legally not supposed to. 

What’s worse: legal repercussions or dying? Alcohol poisoning is a situation that needs emergency assistance, and quickly at that. Just because a person stops drinking doesn’t mean they have evaded the risk of alcohol poisoning, as BAC rises even when a person stops drinking. Cold showers and coffee can’t lower it either. 

So, if a person is suffering from alcohol poisoning it’s important to take these steps: 

  • Keep them company. Since passing out is common among those suffering from alcohol poisoning, it can be dangerous to leave them alone for multiple reasons. For one, they can stop breathing. Also, they can choke on their vomit and die. 
  • Call emergency services. It can be scary to think about what may happen after calling 911 when a peer is suffering from alcohol poisoning, especially when both parties are drunk. Good Samaritan Laws often protect bystanders. 
  • Keep them propped up. Once again, vomiting can be quite dangerous to someone suffering from alcohol poisoning. By propping them up, it minimizes the chances of them choking on vomit. 

How Alcoholism and Symptoms of Alcohol Poisoning Relate 

Signs-of-Alcohol-Poisoning-Approximately 30% of people suffering from alcohol poisoning met the criteria for alcoholism. An alcohol use disorder is a complex and chronic brain disorder that makes it impossibly difficult to quit drinking. Abruptly stopping alcohol consumption with a severe alcohol use disorder can result in dangerous withdrawal symptoms, like seizures. 

When someone suffers from an alcohol poisoning incident, there’s a large chance that they could be someone with an alcohol use disorder. While it’s a chronic disorder, it’s treatable. Yet, it takes the right professional team and a positive mindset. 

Programs To Avoid Symptoms of Alcohol Poisoning

Alcohol Detox

An alcohol detox is one of the most important steps to recovery before treatment. In fact, most addiction treatment facilities won’t begin treatment until all traces and toxins left behind by alcohol are out of a person’s system. Support is crucial during a medical detox, which is why the staff at a detox clinic will provide it 24/7 for patients. 

Additionally, withdrawal symptoms can be extremely dangerous to those with a severe alcohol use disorder. Symptoms can be similar to alcohol poisoning: 

  • Vomiting
  • Nausea 
  • Seizures 
  • Passing out 
  • Confusion 

However, there are additional withdrawal symptoms. The development of mood disorders isn’t uncommon during alcohol withdrawal. If so, the medical team may provide medication to help. Also, they might provide medication to help with any severe withdrawal symptoms. 

Inpatient and Residential Programs

Some addiction recovery specialists feel that inpatient and residential programs are most effective for those who have severe addictions. This is mainly because patients within inpatient programs will live at the facility and dedicate all of their time to recovery. 

Residential programs are a category of inpatient programs. It’s a bit less intense and restrictive. Both forms of inpatient programs are best for those who want to overcome their alcohol use disorder for good. Not only does it give patients more time to build a solid foundation for recovery, but it also allows the team to change detox or treatment if it’s not as effective as it could be. 

Outpatient Programs

Not every person can attend an inpatient program. They might have prior responsibilities, such as children or a full-time job. If so, it’s still important to get help with an alcohol addiction. 

Outpatient programs allow patients to receive addiction treatment without needing to stay at the facility. There are three primary types of outpatient programs which include: 

Addiction Therapy

Whether a recovering individual is in an outpatient or inpatient program, addiction therapy is crucial to recovery. Some include cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), and holistic therapy (includes hypnosis and nature therapy). Each offers its own benefits, so at times, a patient might be a part of all three. 

We Understand the Dangers of Symptoms of Alcohol Poisoning 

Have you or a loved one suffered from alcohol poisoning? If so, contact us now. It’s crucial to get help when this happens so it doesn’t escalate into a much deeper health complication. All it takes is a call or email, so there’s no reason not to. Reach out to our amazing, compassionate, knowledgeable team today to find the hope and help you’ve been searching for! We look forward to walking with you on your journey to a complete recovery from alcohol use disorder.

Alcoholics Anonymous: The Big Book - North Jersey Recovery Center - A bottle lays on its side next to a glass of alcohol. Alcoholics Anonymous: The Big Book has helped many people but is much more effective when combined with treatment at an alcohol rehab center.

Alcoholics Anonymous: The Big Book

What is the 12-Step Program Book?

The 12-step program book has been made famous by every movie and TV show depicting Alcoholics Anonymous meetings.

The Big Book is the foundation of 12-step program meetings.

And Alcoholics Anonymous has become the largest alcoholism support group in the world.

The Big Book contains the steps and traditions created by the brilliant minds behind Alcoholics Anonymous.

It also contains stories about former and current addicts that have gone through this process already.

The 12-step program book guided millions of individuals into a life of sobriety.

This book is one of the many incredibly useful resources we utilize in our addiction treatment programs.

Following the 12-Step Program Book

Since its publication in 1939 by a co-founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, the 12-step program book has become an all-time bestseller.

More than 30 million copies of The Big Book have been printed.

In addition to steps, traditions, and addicts’ stories, it contains the fascinating history of Alcoholics Anonymous and details regarding support methods.

But this is not what The Big Book is known for.

Most people know the 12-step program book for the 12 steps and traditions it contains, as the name suggests.

Millions of recovering alcoholics have followed these steps.

The Big Book has proven so successful that hundreds of other support groups have adapted the steps for their use.

Narcotics Anonymous is a good example of this.

They also follow a 12-step guide to achieve and maintain sobriety.  

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What are the Steps in the 12-Step Program Book?

The steps in The Big Book help recovering alcoholics achieve and maintain their new-found sobriety. The 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous are as follows:

  1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol – that our lives had become unmanageable
  2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity
  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him
  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves
  5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs
  6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character
  7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings
  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all
  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others
  10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it
  11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out
  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs

You do not have to follow any particular religion to use or benefit from the 12 steps in this program. The 12-step program book is a powerful recovery resource. It contains a greater breakdown of each of the 12 steps.

How the 12-Step Program Book can Help

Self-help groups like Alcoholics Anonymous are proven treatment methods that complement and extend the effects of other professional treatments.

They can be incredibly helpful during recovery, as they provide community-based social support. This support helps many people achieve and maintain their abstinence, as well as develop other healthy behaviors.

The stories in this book and the meetings themselves tell other alcoholics, “you are not alone.” Depending on where you are in your recovery journey, these stories can act as guides and keep you focused on sobriety.

The author’s journey is in the first chapter. One of the most powerful sections of the 12-step program book is Part One. In this section, the author shares ten different stories.

These stories are ones of hope. They are about some of the earliest members of Alcoholics Anonymous.

When the book was published, these ten individuals had maintained their sobriety for the remainder of their lives. Reading these stories is a powerful motivator.

Alcoholism in America

There is a good reason that the 12-step program book is considered one of the most important and influential books in American history.

Alcoholism rates in the United States are high, and for some demographics, they continue to rise. In 2018, the National Survey on Drug Use and Health revealed important insight on alcohol consumption in America:

  • 139.8 million Americans were alcohol users within the month of the survey
  • 67.1 million Americans identified as binge drinkers
  • 16.6 million Americans identified as heavy drinkers

If you are struggling with alcohol addiction, Alcoholics Anonymous and the 12-step program book can help you regain control of your life.

Alcohol Rehab Treatment Methods

The 12-step program book, combined with the insight, care, and fellowship you experience in Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, can help change your life.

These meetings are one of the most important and effective treatment methods. And research in this area has told us that we need these services now more than ever before.

Alcoholics Anonymous meetings now take place in-person or online. Alcoholics who have tested both methods have noticed that the two are very similar. Alcoholics Anonymous meetings over platforms like Zoom or Google Hangouts are inclusive, convenient, and essential.

AA meetings provide a unique and important level of support. This particular care method integrates with other alcohol rehab treatment options.

Outpatient care programs work well alongside AA meetings for patients with milder addictions, strong support systems at home, or schedule limitations. However, we also offer more intensive programs, like inpatient treatments and intensive outpatient treatments.

We will work with you to choose the programs that best fit your unique addiction and needs. You do not have to figure it out for yourself.

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Alcohol Rehab

Alcohol Rehab is a vital addiction treatment method. Thankfully, most major health insurance providers offer coverage for a wide range of addiction treatments.

If you have health insurance, but you are not sure what will be covered, please call our admissions department. There is someone available around the clock to review and verify your insurance coverage for you.

They know the best and quickest ways to get through to insurance companies. They will make this process easier for you with this fast and free service.

North Jersey Recover Center Alcoholism Treatments

At North Jersey Recovery Center, 12-step meetings are part of a bigger picture.

We offer various treatment programs, options, and services to meet all of your recovery needs.

We will work with you to build a plan that will help you achieve and maintain sobriety.

And it all starts with the first phone call.

Call our office today for more information or your complimentary insurance verification.

We will walk you through each of the next steps from there.

How Long Alcohol is in Your System North Jersey Recovery Center - A man sits at a bar drinking a beer, which leads to alcohol in your system and can cause harmful effects and even lead to addiction if not monitored carefully.

How Long Alcohol is in Your System

How Long are Five Standard Drinks Are Metabolized in?

People often wonder how long it takes to metabolize a standard drink and how fast you detoxify alcohol per hour.

The short answer is that it depends, but there is more to it than that.

What is BAC?

When asking how long alcohol is in your system or how long it takes to metabolize a standard drink, the term BAC is important.

BAC is blood alcohol content. This is the percentage of alcohol in a person’s bloodstream.

If you have a BAC of .10%, your blood contains one part of alcohol for every 1000 parts of blood.

In most states, you are considered legally intoxicated with a BAC of .08% or higher.

Individual factors that can affect BAC include:

  • The number of standard drinks you have
  • The amount of time you consume the drinks within
  • Enzyme levels and production
  • Gender
  • Bodyweight
  • Medications
  • Whether or not you’ve eaten before drinking

How Much is a Standard Drink?

Most of us do not have an accurate idea of how much is in a standard drink.

The following are examples of a standard drink:

  • One 12 oz. beer
  • One 7 oz. malt liquor
  • A 5 oz. glass of wine
  • 1.5 oz shot of hard liquor

For example, if you were to have a 12-ounce margarita, that would not be a standard drink. That would equal anywhere from two to four standard drinks.

Effects of Alcohol at Different BAC Levels

While every person is different, the following are some of the effects that might occur at different BAC levels:

  • At a BAC of .01-.03, your mood could be mildly elevated. There may not be many outward effects.
  • With a BAC of .04-.06, effects can include feelings of warmth and relaxation. Declines in memory and reasoning may occur.
  • From BAC levels of .07-.09, there may be a slight impairment. It is legal in most places to drive at this level.
  • By the time someone’s BAC reaches .10 to .12, there is likely a significant loss of judgment and impairment. Slurred speech may be noticeable.
  • From .13 to .15, there may be major impairment, including blurry vision and problems with motor control.
  • Levels of .16 to .20 may include nausea and a sloppy outward appearance.
  • Levels of .25 to .30 would mean someone is severely intoxicated.

If someone’s BAC were higher than .30, that could mean they would suffer from alcohol poisoning.

Alcohol poisoning is a medical emergency.

When you drink too much too quickly, you can’t break down the alcohol fast enough.

Binge drinking is the most common reason for alcohol poisoning.

Symptoms of alcohol poisoning include vomiting, reduced body temperature, and passing out.

Alcohol poisoning can lead to brain damage or asphyxiation, and it can be deadly.

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How Does Your Body Metabolize Alcohol?

When you drink alcohol, it enters the digestive system.

Alcohol is digested differently than food or other drinks, though.

Around 20% of alcohol from one drink will go straight to the body’s blood vessels. Then, it goes to the brain.

The rest (80%) goes to your small intestine and then to your bloodstream.

Finally, your liver removes the alcohol.

How Long are Five Standard Drinks Metabolized in?

Back to the original question: How long are five standard drinks metabolized in?

Again, it depends.

In general, most people break down half a standard drink every hour.

If you were initially at a BAC of .08, and you did not drink anything else, your BAC would lower at a rate of around 0.015 an hour.

If you took just one small shot of liquor, it would take your body about an hour to metabolize it.

If you had one pint of beer, it would take two hours.

A large glass of wine would take three hours.

For five standard drinks, it would take at least several hours to metabolize.

Urine and Breath Tests

If you wonder how long is alcohol in your system, you may also wonder about detection tests, such as urine and breath tests.

A urine test can typically detect alcohol in your system between 12 and 48 hours after you drink.

Detection on breath tests is a shorter window of time.

A breath test can detect alcohol for around 24 hours.

A breathalyzer can measure your BAC.

If your BAC is above 0.02, it is considered unsafe to drive.

Factors that Affect How Long it Takes to Metabolize a Standard Drink

As we touched on above, there are individual factors that affect the rate your body processes alcohol.

Some of these factors include:

  • Age: The older you are, the longer alcohol remains in your liver before moving to your bloodstream or before it is metabolized. The older you are, the longer you are likely to be intoxicated if you drink.
  • Sex: Men and women metabolize alcohol differently. Alcohol typically stays in a woman’s system longer. This is likely because women have a lower percentage of water in their bodies than men. Women also have a higher body fat percentage. Hormones also impact how your body processes alcohol.
  • Food: If you eat before drinking, it can help dilute alcohol. Having a full stomach can also slow your stomach’s emptying to the small intestine. If you have an empty stomach, your BAC can be as much as three times higher than someone who ate before drinking.
  • Body size: The higher your body fat percentage, the higher your BAC usually is.
  • Medications: Different medications impact how long it takes your body to process alcohol. Some medicines slow down metabolism, which can play a role. Some medicines also slow down the emptying of the stomach to the small intestine and liver. That means alcohol is rapidly absorbed, leading to higher BAC levels.

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Final Thoughts on Alcohol in Your System

In conclusion, it is very much dependent on the individual concerning how long alcohol is in your system.

For most people, it would take a minimum of several hours, but it could be more.

Individual factors play a big role in how your body can detoxify alcohol per hour.

If you are struggling with alcohol use, binge drinking, or feel that you could have a problem, consider an alcohol treatment program.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we offer various types of programs. No matter what program you take part in, it is always customized to your specific needs.

Our staff is caring and compassionate but also skilled in helping people work toward their recovery goals.

We encourage you to contact us to learn more about our program offerings.

Our team can also verify your insurance and determine your coverage.

Alcohol abuse can lead to financial and legal problems and mental and physical health problems.

Take steps to help yourself today.

North Jersey Recovery Center is ready to help today.

How Much Do Drugs Cost: The Steep Price of Addiction North Jersey Recovery Center - An individual is buying drugs off of the street from a drug dealer and realizing how much he is spending on drugs on a daily basis based on a street drug prices chart.

How Much Do Drugs Cost: The Steep Price of Addiction

Street Drug Prices

Street drug prices are a common area of interest in communities where illicit drugs are common.

However, the cost of street drugs is not only financial and does not just impact the individual.

The abuse of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs costs over $740 billion annually.

This number includes costs related to criminal activities, lost work productivity, and addiction-related healthcare.

Drug abusers often face a multitude of costs, whether related to drug-seeking behaviors, crimes, lost wages, or out-of-pocket medical expenses.

But the physical and mental health costs may be the most troubling.

Our comprehensive rehab programs can help you combat these costs.

The Impact of Street Drug Costs

The financial burden for those struggling with drug addiction can be difficult to bear.

To get an idea of this financial burden, you can look at the street drug prices chart for commonly abused drugs.

This is particularly true for young adults who find themselves using drugs to cope with difficult home or family situations.

Recent studies have shown that anywhere from 40% to 70% of homeless youth abuse drugs or alcohol.

This percentage falls between two and three times higher than the rate among non-homeless individuals in the same age range.

For example, cocaine use is four to five times higher among the homeless than the non-homeless.

Similarly, amphetamine use is three to four times higher.

In this same survey, 71% of homeless youth participants met the criteria for substance abuse disorders, whether for alcohol or illicit drugs, or both.

Whether the homelessness or the addiction came first, the connection is there.

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How Much Does Heroin Cost?

Heroin is an illicit substance with no approved medical uses.

Because heroin is not available through prescription or on a drug store shelf, there is no set price or average price for heroin.

However, there are street drug prices charts you can research to give you an idea of the price range for the cost of heroin.

The form, quantity, location, and other factors can alter the cost of this illicit drug.

Heroin tends to be more affordable than many other illicit and prescription drugs.

But this affordability is only one factor of many to consider.

The costs it demands of your physical and mental health are much more significant than the financial costs.

Potent synthetic opioids like heroin and fentanyl are the most lethal category of illicit substances in the United States.

Drug overdoses, fatal and otherwise, occur at alarmingly high rates in this drug category. They outnumber deaths related to firearms, car accidents, suicides, and homicides each year.

But heroin and other synthetic opioids do not have to cost you your life.

We can help you regain control.

The Link Between Heroin and Prescription Opioids

Most heroin addicts did not start with heroin.

About 80% of heroin users report that they had abused prescription opioids first.

These two types of drugs offer many of the same side effects.

But heroin is stronger, more potent, and often more affordable.

When you abuse prescription opioids after receiving them following an injury, childbirth, or a dental procedure, they can quickly lose their effect.

After you have built a tolerance to prescription opioids, you may find yourself graduating to heroin to achieve the effects that have been lost over time with prescription painkillers.

The withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings that come with long-term heroin abuse can be even more difficult to overcome.

You may feel lost, scared, or helpless.

But we can help.

If you are addicted to heroin or prescription opioids, our medical detox eases your withdrawal symptoms and cravings to set you up for success.

Common Street Drugs and Street Drug Prices Chart

Adderall and meth are two common street drugs because they are generally easy to find and affordable.

Many drug abusers take Adderall to increase their focus and concentration.

These side effects make it a popular drug among younger demographics.

It has been nicknamed “the study drug,” but there is no evidence that Adderall use improves test scores or grade point averages.

Heroin, prescription opioids, benzodiazepines, and central nervous system stimulants are high on the list, as well.

Cocaine, hallucinogens, LSD, and marijuana are common among different demographics.

Whichever illicit substances you find yourself abusing, it is important to consider each of the costs, not just the financial ones.

Street drugs are often more dangerous than prescription drugs, but this depends on the individual and several other factors.

Among many others, one reason for this is that street drugs are often mixed with other substances. The drug dealer often does this without the user’s knowledge.

Adding fentanyl to heroin is a common example of this. Combinations like this one instantly increase your risk of overdosing.

Physical and Mental Costs of Abusing Drugs

The costs to your brain, body, career, and relationships are more impactful than the money you will spend to obtain these drugs.

The physical and mental health tolls that they take over time should be your number one priority.

Depending on a wide range of individual factors, like substances abused, the frequency and dose, and your height, weight, and family history, your side effects may range from mild to severe.

You may experience various side effects — from headaches to hand tremors to hallucinations to seizures.

Higher dosages, increased frequencies, polysubstance addictions, and addictions with underlying mental health disorders may each come with more severe side effects.

Many side effects of drug abuse involve worsening or developing mental health disorders.

If you are experiencing adverse side effects, contact your doctor or another medical professional as soon as possible.

If you are interested in seeking professional and high-level care before your side effects become worse, contact our facility.

We walk you through the steps involved in attending a drug rehab program, enforcing early sobriety, overcoming withdrawals, and everything that comes next.

Rehab Treatment Options

Depending on the specifics of your addiction, mental health, and other needs, we work with you to build a program that will best suit your needs.

Your customized care program will be as unique as you are.

These care programs combine proven therapeutic methods with comprehensive techniques for care, support, and guidance that are genuinely patient-focused.

Some of these program options may include:

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Paying for Addiction Treatments

The cost of treatment is a factor that keeps many people in need of professional help from seeking the addiction care they deserve.

But paying for addiction treatment may be easier than you would think.

If you have health insurance, your treatment may be partially or fully covered.

Most major health insurance providers offer coverage for these types of treatments to some degree.

If you are unsure what is covered under your policy, please call our admissions department.

They will review and verify your insurance for you.

If you are coming to us without health insurance, they can also outline alternative payment options.

North Jersey Recovery Center

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we help you work toward lasting sobriety for a healthier and happier life.

Our goal is to provide each person we meet with individualized, high-quality, and comfortable care.

See the difference that a dedicated team and proven therapeutic techniques can make.

You do not have to face your addiction alone. It is time to try things a better way.

Call us today for more information.

The 7 Types of Alcoholics North Jersey Recovery Center - A depressed young male sits on a couch staring at a beer bottle and a glass filled with beer as he contemplates his alcohol use and if he fits into the different types of alcoholics or not.

The 7 Types of Alcoholics

Are There Different Types of Alcoholics?

What are the different types of alcoholics? Are there seven types of alcoholics?

This is a common question, but it’s one that gets misconstrued.

While research has depicted seven types of alcoholics, we will discuss five types of alcoholics based on what we know about addiction at this time.

Understanding the types of alcoholics first relies on having an understanding of alcohol use disorder (AUD).

What is an Alcoholic?

An alcoholic is someone who meets the criteria for alcohol use disorder.

Alcohol use disorder or alcoholism is a pattern of ongoing alcohol abuse.

Characteristics of alcohol use disorder include:

  • Problems controlling your drinking
  • Drinking even when it causes problems
  • Being preoccupied or obsessed with drinking

You can have unhealthy drinking patterns without being an alcoholic.

For example, binge drinking is considered unhealthy drinking, which is especially common among young people.

However, not everyone who binge drinks meets the criteria for alcohol use disorder.

If your drinking causes distress or problems in your daily life, you likely would be diagnosed with an alcohol use disorder.

As with other addictions, alcohol use disorder can range from mild to severe.

What are the Symptoms of Being an Alcoholic?

An alcoholic is diagnosed with an alcohol use disorder based on a specific set of criteria.

This criterion typically includes:

  • Being unable to limit how much you drink
  • Trying and being unsuccessful at cutting down how much you drink
  • Spending much of your time getting alcohol, drinking, or recovering from the effects of alcohol
  • Not meeting obligations because of alcohol
  • Continuing to drink despite problems in relationships, at work, or school
  • Developing a tolerance requiring you to drink more to get the same effects
  • Being dependent on alcohol and having withdrawal symptoms if you don’t drink

Types of Alcoholics

As was mentioned above, some people believe there are seven types of alcoholics.

In reality, there are likely closer to five types.

These are also called subtypes of alcoholics.

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Young Adult Subtype

Among the types of alcoholics, the young adult subtype is the most common.

This type of alcoholic refers to people between the ages of 18 and 25.

Within this group, the average age at which someone develops an alcohol addiction is 20 years old.

Someone in a young adult subtype might drink less than other types of alcoholics.

However, they will often binge drink when they do.

Someone who is a young adult subtype alcoholic might have an average of 14 drinks a day when they drink.

This group, among other types of alcoholics, is the least likely to get help.

The reduced number of people seeking treatment in this group is because it is usually seen as normal.

When you’re a young adult, partying and drinking may seem like something everyone is doing at that age.

Young Antisocial Subtype

Another type of alcoholic is known as the young antisocial subtype.

These are people who are young adults and may have antisocial personality disorders.

There may be other mental health issues that occur along with a personality disorder.

People who fall into the young antisocial subtype group tend to behave recklessly, increasing the likelihood of developing an alcohol use disorder.

Functional Subtype

Functional alcoholics is another subtype of alcoholics that many people have heard of or are familiar with.

Functional alcoholics don’t always appear to have an alcohol use disorder.

This type of alcoholism generally appears during middle age.

Someone who is a functional alcoholic will often live a completely normal life and can even be very successful.

However, they might drink excessively in the evenings — often as a way to relax.

Some of the issues of functional alcoholism include that it can cause physical health problems.

Problematic patterns of drinking can also be troublesome in terms of relationships.

It is challenging for functional alcoholics to realize there is a problem.

This makes them less likely to seek treatment.

Intermediate Familial Subtype

Someone with a family history of alcoholism may have an intermediate family subtype.

This can stem from different scenarios depending on the specific circumstances.

If someone is raised in an environment of heavy drinking, they may begin to replicate the same patterns.

There may also be a genetic component.

We know that one of the underlying risk factors for alcoholism is genetics.

People in the intermediate familial subtype often have co-occurring mental health problems, such as clinical depression or bipolar disorder.

These mental health conditions have a genetic component as well.

Chronic Severe Subtype

In most cases, chronic severe subtype is the most damaging subtype compared to the different types of alcoholics.

Someone who is in the chronic severe subtype will often drink excessively daily.

Someone who falls under this type of alcoholic is likely to have many physical and lifestyle factors destroyed as a result. Unfortunately, they continue to drink.

Physical dependence is prominent in the severe chronic subtype.

This means that if someone tries to change their drinking patterns, they will likely experience intense withdrawal symptoms.

Around 80% of people in the severe chronic subtype have a familial and genetic alcoholism link.

Someone in this category is also more likely to abuse other drugs too.

If you are concerned about your drinking patterns or someone else’s drinking habits, the below questions are ones you may want to ask yourself or your loved one to determine if there is a problem or not.

  • Do you have a problem stopping drinking once you start?
  • Do you lose control when you start drinking?
  • Do you want to stop drinking but find that you aren’t able to?
  • Do you have cravings for alcohol?
  • Do you keep using alcohol even though it’s causing problems in relationships?
  • Do you ever give up activities to drink instead?
  • Do you drink when it’s risky to do so?
  • Do you need alcohol to feel “normal?”

Help for Different Types of Alcoholics?

If you recognize the signs or symptoms of alcoholism either in yourself or someone you care about, treatment options are available.

The type of treatment you may benefit most from can depend on the category you fall into.

For example, if you’re a functional alcoholic, outpatient treatment may work well for you. This would allow you to continue living and working as normal but receive treatment at the same time.

For someone who is a chronic severe alcoholic, treatment would likely need to be much more intensive.

Treatment might include a supervised medical detox to deal with dangerous withdrawal symptoms.

Then, someone who is a chronic severe alcoholic might start an inpatient program.

Following inpatient treatment, they could live in a sober living house and begin their relapse prevention plan.

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Paying for Treatment

If someone is an alcoholic, they should seek treatment sooner rather than later.

Alcoholism of any kind is a progressing, chronic illness.

This means the longer it goes untreated, the worse the symptoms and outcomes will likely be.

If you are looking for treatment programs, contact North Jersey Recovery Center.

Our program options range from intensive residential treatment to outpatient care.

Our team can verify your insurance coverage to help determine the costs of addiction treatment.

Final Takeaways

There are five different types of alcoholics.

Understanding what these are can help you better identify a problem, whether in yourself or in someone you love.

When you know what type of alcoholic you are, you can also identify what treatment programs could be best.

Is Alcohol a Depressant? North Jersey Recovery Center - A group of individuals attending an inpatient alcohol rehab for alcoholism is engaging in a group therapy session and discussing topics, such as: "Is alcohol a depressant?" as well as other helpful tools and resources to support each other as they continue on their journeys to recovery.

Is Alcohol a Depressant?

Is Alcohol a Stimulant or Depressant?

A pressing question for those trying to understand their alcohol addiction may be: “Is alcohol a depressant?” The answer is yes.

Alcohol is a central nervous system depressant, and it often accomplishes the opposite of what it is meant to. While many people drink to improve their mood, alcohol can worsen it.

Alcohol harms your mental and physical health. It can alter moods, behaviors, and overall functioning.

At the moment, it may help you relax.

However, its side effects and the inevitable hangover increase your anxieties later.

If you are battling alcoholism, our comprehensive addiction programs will help break the cycle.

Why is Alcohol a Depressant?

Alcohol can be hard to categorize because it mimics the effects of both stimulant and depressant drugs.

This tends to lead to some confusion. Alcohol is a tricky substance.

To a certain extent, it may boost your energy levels or moods. On these occasions, it feels as if alcohol is a stimulant.

However, clarity comes with the crash. At this point, it becomes clear why alcohol is a depressant; it slows down your brain’s ability to function and its neurological activities. This occurs because it enhances the effect of a particular neurotransmitter in your brain.

Alcohol also alters your reactions to certain events. When you are under the influence, you may feel slow to respond.

Side effects, like slurring your speech, experiencing unsteadiness in your movements, anger, confusion, and slowed reaction times, are all common.

Alcohol impairs your mental health, too. Alcohol distorts your judgment and makes it challenging to think rationally. Its diminishment of your judgment and ability to think clearly make it easier to make poor choices. These poor choices often lead to accidents, bouts of violence, driving under the influence, and criminal activities.

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Alcoholism in America

Another common question for those battling alcohol addictions is whether or not they are alone. If you are wondering the same thing, the answer is no; you are not alone. Alcohol use disorders are some of the most common substance abuse disorders we see today.

Nearly 18 million American adults have a reported alcohol use disorder. But even still, this may not reflect the full picture.

Many alcohol addictions go untreated, undiagnosed, or unacknowledged. Alcohol use disorders affect a multitude of individuals, families, and communities.

The normalization and ease of access to alcohol are two factors that make it easy to abuse and easy to hide.

What is the Best Way to Address Alcoholism?

Whether as a celebration or a way to ease stress, most American adults drink alcohol. But pretending the problem does not exist will not make the problem better or disappear on its own. Pretending you are fine because you know others who drink as much as you do will not make your addiction easier to overcome.

The best way to understand, address, and overcome your addiction is to accept the help offered and available to you.

Our dedicated professionals will provide care, support, and guidance at each stage of your journey. It is time to change your life for the better.

Where Did My Alcohol Use Disorder Come From?

Addiction is a chronic disease.

It alters your brain’s chemistry and changes our thoughts and behaviors. The idea that addiction equates to a lack of willpower is a false and damaging one.

Many people have a genetic predisposition to becoming an alcoholic, as alcoholism tends to run in families. It has impacted the lives of millions of families over the years. Growing up in a household that normalizes alcohol abuse makes it even harder to avoid.

Other common contributors to alcoholism rates in America include social and environmental challenges. Stressful careers or relationships, underlying mental health disorders, and trauma are also often linked to alcoholism.

Whether alcoholism runs in your family or other factors have contributed to your addiction, we can help.

A big piece of addiction treatment is understanding why your addiction occurred in the first place. By identifying your concerns, triggers, and temptations, you can effectively address them.

You can choose healthy habits, social networks, and coping mechanisms instead.

Alcoholism and Mental Health

After genetics, mental health disorders are some of the most common causes of alcohol use disorders.

What makes this even more tricky is that alcoholism does not always come first. You may begin drinking to cope with symptoms of a diagnosed or undiagnosed mental health disorder, or your drinking may lead to a mental health disorder.

In either order, this combination can lead to short-term and long-term mental and physical health impairments.

The combination of a mental health disorder and substance abuse disorder is called a dual diagnosis. We offer a specialized program to address this type of disorder.

Some of the most common dual diagnosis combinations include substance abuse and:

  • Generalized anxiety disorders
  • Panic disorders
  • Post-traumatic stress disorders
  • Depression
  • Bipolar disorders
  • Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorders
  • Psychotic illnesses
  • Borderline personality disorders
  • Antisocial personality disorders
  • Schizophrenia

There are many different possible dual diagnosis combinations.

Whether your mental illness is diagnosed or unconfirmed, we can help. We will see you through from our first phone call to our addiction aftercare services.

Alcohol Addiction Treatments

Many alcohol addiction programs begin with a medically assisted detox. This type of detox will ease your withdrawal symptoms and cravings to make the process easier. Free from temptations and distractions, you will have a safe place to focus on building a happy, healthy, and sober life. This detox will restore your strength and confidence, setting you up for success.

From there, we offer various proven treatment programs and methods. We customize each program based on your needs rather than offering cookie-cutter or unspecific pre-written programs.

We evaluate your addiction with you to ensure we choose the right care settings and methods.

Whether you choose the 24-hour inpatient setting, the flexible outpatient care, or a supplemental program, you will have access to the resources, tools, care, and support you need.

We also help with multiple or polysubstance addictions, underlying mental health disorders, and other complications.

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Paying for Alcohol Rehab

In recent years, it has become easier to find affordable and flexible addiction treatments. Part of this is due to changes in health insurance coverage laws.

Most major health insurance providers now offer coverage for addiction treatments.

You may have partial or full coverage for your alcohol rehab program.

If you are unsure of what your coverage entails, please call our admissions department.

They will review and verify your insurance for you. They will also outline alternative payment options if you do not have insurance.

North Jersey Recovery Center

Your alcoholism can only define you if you allow it to.

If you are ready to take back the reins and regain control of your life, we are ready to help you get there.

We will walk the path to recovery with you.

We will be there every step of the way.

Through proven care methods, individualized treatment programs, and various continued care options, we help you identify and achieve your goals.

Call us today for more information.

Demi Lovato’s Relapse

The Harrowing Story of What Addiction Does, and How You Can Overcome It

Addiction touches the lives of billions around the world.

Many of us suffer quietly with drugs and do not admit it because of the stigma surrounding addiction.

We do not want to be labeled “junky,” “addict,” or “dopehead.”

We fear judgment from others as being weak and lacking self-control.

Demi Lovato’s admission of addiction broke the barrier that holds so many of us, prisoners, to our addiction.

We fear what others will say or think.

Drug addiction is real, and it devours those from all walks of life, including pop stars.

You are not alone.

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Does Our Past Cause Addiction?

Demi Lovato was robbed of a normal childhood because of her father’s own struggle with addiction to drugs and alcohol.

She remembers his drunken rages and violent outbursts.

Now 25-year-old Demi recalls being a depressed child often consumed with thoughts of death.

She often played out a scenario in her mind of what her funeral would be like.

At the age of 5, Demi began modeling and competing in beauty pageants.

She dove headfirst into acting and singing when she appeared on “Barney and Friends.”

Her school years were jaded by the taunting and bullying she endured.

Demi was called all kinds of names, and one that impacted her life was being labeled “fat.”

She made a vision board with pasted cutouts of slim celebrities she wanted to be like.

As a result of being called fat, Demi developed bulimia—frequently binging on food and purging it afterward.

She was later recruited by Disney Channel, where she starred on “As the Bell Rings” and “Camp Rock.”

At the age of 15, Demi began touring with the Jonas Brothers.

The lifestyle of acting while singing on the road became immensely overwhelming.

She was under immense stress to maintain a squeaky-clean life while being flexible enough to become a pop singer.

The stress Demi was under, coupled with her eating disorder and her father’s addiction, weighed heavily on her.

All while suffering from depression, things started to unravel.

At the age of 17, Demi had her first hit of cocaine. Her first time trying it was scary, but she began to love how it made her feel.

She began drinking alcohol and doing more cocaine.

As the stress of touring and acting increased, she started taking Adderall to help her keep up.

With drugs, alcohol, depression, and bulimia combined, she was at an explosive point in her life.

She was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, which helped explained the highs and lows she was experiencing.

Those around her noticed a change in her personality, such as her angry outbursts.

Demi Lovato’s addiction was so bad that she admitted to carrying bags of drugs around because she craved them.

Her manager got her help, but she managed to fake drug tests and find ways to keep using.

She can remember a day when she had used cocaine, Xanax, and alcohol and was unsure if she would overdose.

Demi Lovato’s rehab kept her sober for six years.

While sober, she found that she was still just as miserable as she was when she used drugs.

The team of people managing her controlled everything from what she ate to what she would wear.

She became overwhelmed and relapsed by drinking alcohol.

Later that night, she went out with friends and used drugs.

It was three months after her relapse that she overdosed and ended up in the hospital.

Demi had a sudden realization that she needed help.

She went back into rehab and has since lived a clean life that she is proud of.

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Demi Lovato’s Addiction and Mental Disorders

Demi Lovato’s addiction intensified her bulimia, bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety, and suicidal tendencies.

Likewise, her existing mental disorders fueled her abuse of drugs. 

She was caught in a vicious cycle that led to her addiction.

Drug Abuse Leads to Addiction

Flirting with drugs often opens the door to addiction.

All it takes is one time to get you hooked. Demi Lovato’s drug addiction is an example of this.

Demi’s addiction to cocaine happened the moment she “just tried” it.

She liked the way it made her feel. 

When we are swimming in emotional pain, we want to feel better.

When drugs provide that outlet, guess what? We take it.

How does Demi Lovato’s addiction mirror our own?

The moment we “try” drugs, we begin a downward spiral just like Demi did. 

Do you want to continue down that road the Demi Lovato was on, or do you want to be like her and grab your life back?

Get Help!

Take the first step and admit you have a problem.

Do not let the stigma of drug addiction stand in the way of you regaining control of your life.

Demi Lovato’s drug addiction story shows us just how dangerous drug abuse is.

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How do you get treatment?

  1. Admit you need help.
  2. Call a professional because once you become dependent on drugs because you cannot tackle it alone. When you attempt to go the DIY route with treatment, you set yourself up for relapse.
  3. You will go through an intake process and a health screening.
  4. Instructions will be provided to you on which facility to go to.
  5. You will meet with therapists, counselors, and medical specialists who develop a tailored treatment plan.
  6. As an inpatient, you will go through detox to clean your body of all substances. This is done either through social methods or medically.
  7. Once you are stable, you will go to our “partial hospitalization” program, where you will continue treatment as a resident while easing back into your everyday life. The next step in the program is “outpatient.”
  8. As an outpatient, you will attend scheduled visits for treatment. If you need to schedule those visits around your busy life, we understand. We offer intensive outpatient therapy for such occasions.


Payment and Insurance

 
Our staff is more than happy to verify your insurance on your behalf to make things easier for you.

You also have the option to use our online verification form to do it yourself.
 

A Clean Life is a Great Life

We hope that sharing Demi Lovato’s addiction story with you is convincing enough to encourage you to get help.

Do what is best for you, regardless of what others might say about addiction.

Do not let them have control over the opportunity to live a clean and fabulous life!

Contact us at North Jersey Recovery Center today.

Is Alcohol a Drug North Jersey Recovery Center - A woman is struggling with her dependence on alcohol because is alcohol a drug? She is debating seeking treatment for her alcohol addiction

Is Alcohol a Drug?

Understanding Alcoholism and Where to Turn for Help

 
Many of us look forward to a few beers after work or a glass of wine while cooking dinner.

If we were to log how much alcohol we consume every week, we might notice a pattern that repeats itself.

Is it possible we are addicted to alcohol?

Is alcohol a drug?

It turns out that alcohol is a drug because it falls within the class of depressants.

You CAN become addicted to alcohol, which is referred to as “alcoholism.”


What is Alcohol?

 
Alcohol is a drink that is produced through fermentation.

The ingredients often include grains, fruits, sugar, yeast, and water.

We commonly know alcohol as beer, wine, and liquor, but is alcohol a drug?

Origins of Alcohol

Alcoholic beverages go thousands of years back.

A sense of pleasure and relaxation became the basis for drinking alcohol.

  • Evidence of alcohol appeared from the discovery of beer jugs dating back to around 10,000 B.C.
  • Egyptian hieroglyphics from around 4,000 B.C. indicate drinking wine is mentioned throughout the Bible as well.

As the 19th century rolled in, limitations on drinking alcohol were enforced, especially through prohibition.

Since then, alcohol has been regulated by laws restricting certain age groups from buying and drinking.

However, these laws often fail to curb the use of alcohol.

Young people still find ways to drink, and alcohol has become common in most social gatherings and events.

Ingredients in Alcohol

The combination of sugars and yeast, and other ingredients, causes a chemical process that produces ethanol.

It is this ethanol that, when consumed, changes the way our brain and body function.

Different types of alcoholic beverages contain varying amounts of ethanol.

Certain drinks will cause more intense symptoms than others.

The higher the alcohol content, the stronger the symptoms.

Addiction is not affected by the content of alcohol.

It can happen whether you consume beer or the hard stuff.

The main question is: Is alcohol a drug?

Alcohol Content in Different Types of Drinks

High Content:

  • Moonshine 100%
  • Liqueurs up to 60%
  • Vodka up to 50%
  • Whiskey up to 50%
  • Tequila up to 40%
  • Rum up to 40%


Low Content:

  • Wine and Wine Coolers up to 20%
  • Ciders and Ales up to 8%
  • Beer up to 6%

Alcohol is a Drug

Is alcohol a drug? If so, what kind of drug is alcohol?

Alcohol is a type of depressant, similar to many prescription drugs.

Alcohol may not be “prescribed,” but it affects the brain in many of the same ways that other drugs do.

Prescription Depressants:

  • Tranquilizers
  • Antipsychotics
  • Sedatives
  • Sleeping pills

 
Is alcohol a drug that is considered as bad as prescription depressants?

Yes, alcohol is just as addictive as Xanax, Lunesta, Klonopin, or any other depressant.

Effects of Alcohol

The side effects of alcohol are what drives us to seek it out and drink it.

How many of us go to a social gathering and enjoy a beer or glass of wine?

Do those drinks help you to relax and be more sociable?

The marriage of food and alcohol is often enjoyed, especially with BBQs, dinner parties, and cocktail hours.

Why? Because the “side effects” of alcohol can loosen us up to have more fun.

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Short-term Side Effects of Alcohol

The most immediate side effect of alcohol is that it makes us feel drunk.

These are some of the symptoms of drunkenness:
 

  • Sense of calm, relaxation
  • Impaired motor skills
  • Lack of coordination
  • Impaired thinking
  • Dizziness
  • Slurred speech
  • Feeling tired
  • Lower heartbeat, blood pressure, breathing
  • Overall feeling of sadness
  • Urination difficulty
  • Blackouts

Long-term Side Effects of Alcohol

Is alcohol a drug that can cause serious and lasting side effects?

Yes, alcohol is the root of alcoholism, which is an addiction. 

Long term use of alcohol changes our brains and bodies in ways we may not be aware of.

Mental and Physical Side Effects

  • Addiction (alcoholism)
  • Alcohol poisoning
  • Loss of sex drive
  • Permanent brain damage
  • Liver damage/disease
  • Malnutrition
  • Blackouts
  • Stroke
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart disease
  • Ulcers
  • Gastritis
  • Cancer
  • Permanent nerve damage
  • Worsening of mental disorders
  • Suicidal thoughts/tendencies
  • Suicide
  • Death
  • Moodiness
  • Abusive behavior
  • Fetal deformities
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
  • Stillbirth
  • Miscarriage
  • Development of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome
    • An alarming 80% of alcoholics are deficient in thiamine. This deficiency can lead to Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome, which is a brain disorder causing encephalopathy or psychosis.

Social Side Effects

  • Divorce
  • Relationship strain
  • Self-isolation
  • Indirect harm through accidents
  • Loss of job
  • Loss of friends
  • Loss of home
  • Financial strain
  • Drunk driving that can lead to arrest or imprisonment
  • Loss of driving privileges
  • Arrest and imprisonment
  • Requiring a lifetime of someone caring for you

Mental Illness and Alcoholism

 
Is alcohol a drug that worsens existing mental disorders?

In short, yes, it can.

Alcohol abuse is associated with numerous mental disorders and can exacerbate their severity.
 

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Mental Disorders Associated with Alcoholism

Alcohol Abuse Leads to Addiction

Why is alcohol a drug of choice for so many of us?

Alcohol does not require a prescription and is obtainable by merely going to the store.

Is alcohol a drug that only affects adults? No, it has the same addictive ability for teens, middle-aged adults, as well as the elderly.

When is alcohol abuse a drug problem?

The varying demographics of alcohol abuse and addiction are startling in contrast to what many of us think.

Under-Age Alcohol Abuse Within the U.S. during 2018:

  • Approximately 7.1 million under the age of 20 consumed alcohol, of which 19.5% were females, and 18.2% were males.
  • Approximately 4.3 million under the age of 20 participated in binge drinking.
  • Approximately 861,000 (2.3% of the age-group population) under the age of 20 heavily abused alcohol.

 
Older Adults and Alcohol Abuse Within the U.S. during 2018:

  • 3% of adults admit to drinking alcohol.
  • 45% of adults admit to binge drinking.
  • 6% of adults admit to heavily abusing alcohol.

 
A study done in 2012 indicated that 10% of children in the U.S. had an alcoholic parent.
 
When is alcohol use an addiction?

  • You crave it and cannot go for long periods without it.
  • You drink all throughout the day or night.
  • You cannot enjoy social events without drinking.
  • You spend your last dollar on alcohol.
  • You become violent and abusive towards your loved ones.
  • You prefer to drink alone.

 
If you see yourself in any of the above scenarios, facts, or statistics, you need help.

Many of us with an addiction to alcohol do not view ourselves as alcoholics.

Taking the first step in admitting you are an alcoholic is the hardest part of this recovery journey.

Reaching Out for Help

When you continue to allow alcohol to control you and your life, you stand to lose so much.

Your sense of pride, independence, and your loved ones are far more precious than a drink.

Even worse, can you live with yourself if you drink and drive and end up killing someone?

Did you know that someone dies because of a drunk driver every 50 minutes in the U.S.?

How Do You Get Help?

Admitting you have a drinking problem is the first and hardest step.

Now it is time to get help from professionals who will be by your side the entire time.

The next step to take is to make that call.
 
North Jersey Recovery Center is a leading treatment facility for alcoholism.

We have a professional standing by 24/7 to take your phone call.

The moment you speak with someone, you will be embraced with compassion.

Inpatient

Detox is a necessary step to rid your body of alcohol.

You will be admitted as an inpatient where you have the choice of social or medical detox.

A team of medical professionals will be by your side during the entire process until you have stabilized.

After you are stable, you will then advance to the “inpatient hospitalization” program, where you ease back into life while still residing at the facility.

Outpatient

When you have graduated to the outpatient program, you will visit the facility as scheduled to continue treatment.

For those who need to plan their treatment around work, children, or school, we offer “intensive outpatient therapy.”

Payment and Insurance

Our staff is more than happy to verify your insurance on your behalf to make things easier for you. You also have the option to use our online verification form to do it yourself.


Regaining Control to Live a Full Life

Treatment is a gift to yourself and to those you love.

Do not let alcohol slowly strip you of the most valuable things and pleasures of life.

You have value and worth, and who knows, you may be the one who inspires someone else with the same problem to find help.

Be their inspiration!

6 Ways to Know You Have a Drinking Problem North Jersey Recovery Center - A man is thinking about the red flags that may mean a drinking problem is prevalent and he may need treatment for alcohol addiction

6 Ways to Know You Have a Drinking Problem

What is Considered a Drinking Problem?

 
Alcohol drinking is a sensitive subject for those who drink but profess they do not have a drinking problem.

Awareness is the first step in how to know if you have a drinking problem.

Admitting you have a drinking problem is the first step, but we look at the different things that indicate dependence (addiction) on alcohol before we go that far.

If you or a loved one drinks a lot, this article will give you a better understanding of alcohol dependence.

  • Do you drink throughout the day?
  • Do you need alcohol to get through any type of social gathering or event?
  • Have you noticed that you are always holding a beer or drink in photos?
  • Do you lose track of time or have blackouts?
  • Has your loved one left you because of alcohol?

Is Alcohol a Drug?

Alcohol does not have the same chemicals that drugs do.

However, alcohol is a depressant and is classified as such.

You can grow dependent on alcohol.

We want to give you an overview of what alcohol addiction looks like.

Alcohol is classified as a depressant. Although it is a beverage and obtainable by going into a store, it is a drug.

A drug is defined as a substance that has the potential to enhance physical or mental welfare. It is not used medically.

Tranquilizers, sedatives, sleeping pills, and antipsychotics produce the same effect as alcohol.

Anytime a depressant enters the body, our brains tell us to relax and loosen up.

This is why you see alcohol present in almost every kind of social gathering.

It helps us to mingle and socialize.

Light drinking keeps us giddy, happy, and relaxed.

Whereas, heavy drinking is sedating to the point you have impaired function.

6 Red Flag Warnings: How to Know if You Have a Drinking Problem

As you read through the below red flags, you will notice a vicious cycle of cause and effect that never ends.

This is what keeps us trapped in the addiction to alcohol.

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Red Flag #1: You Feel Like You Have No Control Over Your Life

Obsessive thinking about whether you may need help is an indicator of knowing if you have a drinking problem.

If you must ask yourself that question, you may have a problem.

Many of us who do have an alcohol dependence feel as though we are losing control.

This can happen because of losing loved ones, friends, or jobs because of our drinking.

When the bank forecloses on your home, or a recovery truck pulls up and hauls your car off because you no longer have a job that makes you feel very helpless.

The thoughts that race through our mind on what we are doing to ourselves causes us to drink more.

Red Flag #2: You Drink at Inappropriate Times and Places

Alcoholics do not care where or when they drink. The craving and need for alcohol distort all reasoning and rationale.

Such scenarios that will help you with how to know if you have a drinking problem include:

  • Showing up to church with alcohol on your breath or a flask neatly tucked in your pocket
  • Driving while drinking, which is especially dangerous if your loved ones are with you
  • As soon as the alarm clock rings in the morning, you opt for a drink instead of coffee or breakfast
  • You need “chasers” to help a previous binge
  • You drink heavily in front of children, therefore, setting a bad example for them
  • You rush home every day to have that cocktail, which is followed up with dinner, wine, and a bedtime nightcap
  • You show up at an AA meeting drunk or you sneak off to the bathroom to drink during a meeting
  • You must spike your coffee at work, or you have a bottle hidden in your desk that you retreat to when no one is looking

Do you get the picture? Alcohol seemingly finds its way into every activity during the day.

Red Flag #3: You Have a Criminal Record Because of Drinking

You have been pulled over for drinking and driving. As a result, you were arrested. This is a BIG red flag yelling at you: “This is how to know if you have a drinking problem!”

One arrest leads to two or three, and before you know it, you no longer have a driver’s license and must depend on public transportation or someone else to get you to where you need to go each day.

Spending time in jail is not what you had in mind, but it has happened to you. Repeated arrests lead to longer jail sentences as well.

Once you are out of jail, you go home and grab a beer because you have missed having it while in jail and just need to unwind.

Red Flag #4: Your Drinking Drove Away Loved Ones

Have you been in such a drunken rage that you hit your spouse or threw something at the TV and broke it? These are two examples of how to know if you have a drinking problem.

As our husband or wife walks out the door, we know we cannot stop drinking to keep them from leaving.

We will promise and beg to be better, but we do not get better.

Having our children witness their dad or mom lying on the floor in urine-soaked clothing or vomit from drinking is humiliating, to say the least.

Our families lose all respect for us when we allow alcohol to dictate our lives.

Many of us have such violent outbursts after drinking that we have physically and emotionally hurt those we love.

The regret that comes after the alcohol wears off is so painful that we grab another drink.

Red Flag #5: You Have to Drink More as the Effects Wear Off to Avoid Withdrawal Symptoms

When we begin to feel sweaty, shaky, and overall sick, we know it is time for another drink.

We do not want to experience the unpleasantries of withdrawal.

As soon as our body begins to quiver, we drink. This is perhaps one of the main reasons we continue to drink.

Feeding the hungry demon within ourselves leaves us feeling completely out of control.

We know we need help but are afraid to admit our problem.

It is more convenient to keep drinking than invest the time to go to rehab.

Red Flag #6: You Have Repeated Loss of Time You Can’t Account for

Have you ever woken up disoriented and confused about how you ended up in a strange place? Not only is it frightening, but you feel vulnerable and afraid. When you are trying to piece things together, you can only assume your drinking landed you where you are.

Blackouts happen because of heavy drinking.

The college days of waking up on someone’s sofa after a night of partying are long gone.

A blackout does not necessarily define unconsciousness. You can get behind the wheel of a vehicle, walk somewhere, or be a part of illicit activities that you do not remember doing.

The fact that you can harm or kill yourself or others during a blackout should be enough to cause you to seek help.

But instead, you drink to numb the fear and sense of helplessness that a blackout causes you. This is a serious red flag on how to know if you have a drinking problem.

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Payment Options

Do you want treatment but are worried about how you can pay for it?

We have a team of financial professionals who provide free insurance verification.

We will work with you to determine how to move forward with the treatment in a way that works for you and your financial situation.

How to Get Help

There are so many reasons why you should get help.

We should love ourselves enough to grant ourselves the opportunity to live a clean and sober life.

Now that you have information on how to know if you have a drinking problem, take that step, and get help.

Call North Jersey Recovery Center at 877-786-0572 to schedule your consultation.

You deserve to live a happy life free from alcoholism.