Black Tar Heroin Abuse and Addiction North Jersey Recovery Center - A young woman is mixing the black drug, otherwise known as black tar heroin, into a spoon before she heats up the spoon to inject the dangerous substance into her body.

Black Tar Heroin Abuse and Addiction

Black Tar Heroin

Heroin, in any of its forms, is a powerful opioid drug.

It is made from morphine, a naturally occurring substance contained in the seeds of opium poppy plants.

But this Schedule I drug has no approved medical uses and an incredibly high potential for addiction.

Any amount of heroin use can prove to be dangerous.

If you are using or addicted to the black drug, our comprehensive addiction programs help you make necessary changes today.

Common Forms of Heroin

Black tar heroin is the second most common form of this particular opioid.

Powdered heroin is the most common. This powder is usually white or brown.

Heroin, in different forms, is typically smoked, injected, snorted, or swallowed.

In scientific settings, the black drug is known as diacetylmorphine.

More commonly, it is known as heroin, dope, black drug, or smack.

How Does Black Tar Heroin Addiction Start?

Heroin users rarely begin using heroin. Most heroin users report trying it for the first time after developing a tolerance to prescription opioids. Prescription painkillers, like Vicodin and Percocet, are two of the most common gateways.

When you abuse opioids, they begin to become less effective. This leads to many opioid users to try something stronger. Around 948,000 American adults reported using heroin between 2015 and 2016.

Often, heroin is less expensive, more potent, and easier to obtain than prescriptions. It produces similar effects at higher and faster levels. For these reasons, black tar heroin and other forms appeal to those with persistent pains and opioid addictions.

However, once you make the switch to black tar heroin, it is challenging to go back. This is true whether you are hoping to switch back to prescription opioids or cease drug use altogether.

Where Does Black Tar Heroin Come From?

Heroin itself comes from the morphine in the seeds of opium poppy plants native to Mexico, Colombia, and Asia. The majority of heroin used or seized in the United States comes from Mexico.

Heroin is one of the most frequently smuggled drugs. As such, seizures from heroin use have continued to increase over the decades. In addition, arrests and prison sentences for crimes related to heroin have increased.

Initiatives have been put in place to counter, monitor, and decrease drug trafficking, but there are still many obstacles to face to get heroin use to decrease as much as possible.

Short-Term Side Effects of Smoking Black Tar Heroin

The short-term side effects of smoking black tar heroin are ones that users hope to experience over the unpleasant long-term side effects. These side effects include feelings of euphoria, pleasurable feelings, stress and anxiety relief, and drowsiness.

These are highly addictive feelings for many drug users. Because they are short-lived, you are forced to quickly and frequently increase your dose to achieve the same effects. As you continue using heroin, reaching the original effects of your “first high” becomes increasingly difficult.

These short-lived effects contribute to the potential for addiction. They also increase the chance of an overdose. Black tar heroin, the black drug, and other forms of heroin alter your brain’s chemistry. They alter the pathways, rewiring the ways our brains and bodies produce, and recognize certain feelings.

After some time, it is harder for your brain to produce these feelings naturally. This dependency is dangerous and has led to a troubling increase in heroin-related overdoses. Between 1999 and 216, overdoses related to heroin increased from 1,960 to 15,469.

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Long-Term Side Effects of Smoking Black Tar Heroin

Many people begin smoking black tar heroin to achieve pleasurable, euphoric, or drowsy feelings without knowing on what dangers and health issues the drug can cause. Heroin rewires your brain and breaks down your mental processes.

With short and long-term use, smoking black tar heroin causes various unpleasant and potentially dangerous side effects. Heaviness in the limbs, cloudy mental states, and unexpected changes from consciousness to semi-consciousness are common side effects of heroin use. Others include intense itchiness, nausea or vomiting, dry mouth, and warm flushes.

As unpleasant as these may be, these are some of the milder side effects. With long-term or high quantities of use of the black drug, some common heroin abuse side effects include:

  • Insomnia
  • Skin abscesses
  • Cramps and constipation
  • Infections in the heart lining or valves
  • Pneumonia
  • Liver disease and kidney disease
  • Mental health impairments

On its own, heroin is a dangerous substance; however, it becomes increasingly dangerous when mixed with other substances. Many heroin users have mixed it with crack cocaine to create a substance called a speedball. This combination increases the risk of suffering permanent mental or physical damage and even an overdose.

Black Tar Heroin and Mental Health

On top of the dangerous physical side effects of black tar heroin use, it also impairs your mental health. Depression and anxiety are two mental health disorders often linked to heroin use. Heroin use can generate a new mental health disorder or worsen an existing one. Dual diagnosis is the term for co-existing mental health disorders and addictions. If you are battling a dual diagnosis, you are not alone. And our specialized dual diagnosis programs can help.

Black Tar Heroin Withdrawal Symptoms

Black tar heroin withdrawal symptoms are generally intense and severe. This is one factor that makes it so challenging to quit on your own. However, our medically-assisted detoxes were designed for situations like this one. Within a few hours of ceasing heroin use, you may begin experiencing withdrawal symptoms. Heroin withdrawals are typically more physical and psychological. Some common heroin withdrawal symptoms include:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Anxiety
  • Insomnia
  • Excessive sweats
  • Muscle cramps

On average, heroin withdrawal symptoms begin from eight to 24 hours after you stop using heroin. They can last from four to 10 days. But certain approved and monitored medications help ease the pain and discomfort of withdrawal symptoms.

These medications are designed to reduce drug cravings too. Our medical detox is one of the various benefits of seeking addiction care in our luxurious facility with our dedicated and passionate staff.

Drug Addiction Treatment Options

Our drug addiction treatment options range from full-time stays to a few hours spent in our facility per week. Inpatient treatment in our safe, comfortable, and secure facility are ideal for anyone who needs a more structured environment.

We offer a space full of luxury amenities, daily structure, proven treatment methods, and support away from stressful situations, temptations, triggers, and distractions. Focusing on your recovery and learning healthy life skills to maintain your sobriety moving forward is of utmost importance.

During inpatient stays, you can focus full-time on healing your body and mind. Our behavioral therapies, proven techniques, and holistic remedies provide an opportunity for a well-rounded recovery.

For those who do not need 24-hour care or have obligations that require their attention at home, we offer several other programs, combining care and flexibility.

We work with you to identify the addiction treatment program that best suits your addiction, mental health disorders, and additional needs. These alternative programs include outpatient programs, partial care programs, and intensive outpatient programs.

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Paying for Drug Addiction Treatments

Most major health insurance providers provide addiction care coverage. If you have health insurance coverage, your program may be partially or fully covered.

If you are unsure what is covered under your policy, please call our team of experienced admissions specialists. They will perform fast and free insurance verification to determine what your insurance policy covers. If you do not have health insurance, our team of experts will outline alternative payment options.

North Jersey Recovery Center

When you choose North Jersey Recovery Center, you choose high-level, customized, and dedicated addiction care.

You choose a safe, comfortable, and convenient facility away from the noise and distractions of New Jersey, New York City, or even your hometown that is full of familiar triggers and places — reminding you of your drug use.

See the difference a well-rounded and dedicated approach can make.

Call us today.

The Opioid Epidemic - North Jersey Recovery - Close up photo of the chest of a man in scrubs with a stethoscope around his neck as he holds out a bottle of opioids in his left hand and some white pills in his right hand.

The Opioid Epidemic: What Is It and What Can You Do?

The Opioid Epidemic

The most common drugs related to the opioid epidemic are fentanyl, heroin, oxycodone, and hydrocodone.

Morphine, codeine, methadone, and tramadol are other common opioids.

Both natural and synthetic prescription and illicit drugs have driven the opioid epidemic.

Nearly 450,000 people died from overdoses involving opioids from 1999 to 2018.

Opioids vs. Opiates

Opiates are drugs naturally derived from the seeds of opium poppy plants.

Opioids are either fully synthetic or partially synthetic.

This means that they are created chemically or with both chemical and natural ingredients.

Opioids are classified as any drugs that produce opiate-like effects, encompassing both categories and driving what we call the opioid epidemic.

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Opioid Misuse Rates

Many opioids and opiates have valuable medical uses when they are taken appropriately, but they are rarely used the right way. And many of them are highly addictive and dangerous. Their potency and addictive qualities make them easy to abuse.

Their high rates of abuse and addiction have led to alarming numbers of fatal overdoses, medical conditions, and accidents. This is why it is known as the opioid epidemic.

Approximately 10.3 million individuals reported misusing opioids within the last year when surveyed in 2018. There were 9.9 million misused prescription painkillers, 808,000 used heroin, and about 506,000 used both.

In both prescription and illicit drug use, opioid abuse can be hard to monitor and control.

Causes of the Opioid Epidemic

The opioid epidemic has occurred in waves. And the causes of the opioid epidemic have changed accordingly. During the 90s, the opioid epidemic was driven by an increase in prescription opioids.

Overdoses and patterns of physical and mental health problems led to shorter-term and fewer prescriptions. The next wave started in 2010 when we see an alarming and rapid increase in fatal heroin overdoses. Because there are no prescriptions or medical uses for heroin, its use became increasingly difficult to regulate.

The final wave started less than a decade ago in 2013. This wave was driven by synthetic opioids. With this wave, we saw a significant increase in fatal overdoses that involved the synthetic fentanyl. Traces of fentanyl are often found in heroin samples, illicit pills, and cocaine.

Drug dealers may slip fentanyl into their other drugs to keep their costs low and profit high. This practice can be deadly for unsuspecting drug users. There is no singular cause of the opioid epidemic. Each one presents unique dangers and concerns.

Prescription Opioids

Addictions to prescription opioids often start after an accident or injury occurs. These high-level painkillers are often prescribed for moderate to severe or unresponsive pains.

When used the right way, they can ease your pain and create euphoric feelings while you heal. But after a while, you may notice that they are not as effective as they were at the start. T

his usually means that your body is building a tolerance to its effects. As this happens, you will need to take more to achieve the same level of pain relief and other side effects.

You may be driven to take them in larger doses or take them more frequently. You may also begin to experience drug cravings. This is when addiction begins.

Drug cravings and withdrawal symptoms can make it hard for you to stop taking opioids. Increasing doses and graduating to stronger drugs are common. But these activities can compromise your health, altering your thoughts and behaviors along the way.

Our comprehensive addiction treatments can help you end the abusive cycle of addiction.

Side Effects of Opioid Addictions

Like many other drugs, there is a wide range of possible side effects from opioid addiction. These effects can be both physical and psychological.

Many remain the same, regardless of whether they are natural or synthetic, but other factors may alter them. Your method of ingestion, mental health, and the use of additional substances are a few important factors to consider. Some of the most common opioid-related side effects include:

  • Nausea
  • Constipation
  • Itchiness
  • Drowsiness
  • Confusion and memory loss
  • Mood swings, including depressive episodes
  • Respiratory depression or slowed breathing

You do not have to live with the side effects of your opioid addiction. Entering an addiction treatment program is the first step in building a healthy, sober life.

Opioids and Mental Illnesses

As is made clear by the side effects listed above, opioids can impair your mental health. Confusion, memory loss, and mood swings are commonly linked to opioid abuse.

Beyond these side effects, other mental health impairments are possible, as well. If you have diagnosed or undiagnosed depression, taking opioids can worsen it. But beginning with opioids can lead to depression because of the way that it alters your brain chemistry.

The link is strong and can connect opioids and mental illnesses in either direction. Dual diagnosis is the term we use for addiction and mental health disorders co-existing.

We offer a specialized program that addresses each of these unique concerns, as well as their connection. Breaking the connection and treating each disorder simultaneously can ensure that one does not remain and worsen the other in time.

Addiction Treatment Options

Each of our addiction treatment programs takes place in our comfortable, safe, and amenity-packed facility. We are conveniently located for those throughout New Jersey and others looking to distance themselves from Manhattan during their recovery.

Enjoy the highest levels of privacy during your treatment outside of New York City and away from all of the distractions and temptations it holds. For addictions as strong as those to opioids, inpatient care is often preferred.

This type of program often begins with medical detox to ease your withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings. It then continues into 24-hour care.

Each day will be filled with healthy meals, proven therapeutic methods, meetings, support groups, down-time, and holistic remedies. But if you have family or work obligations that require you to stay at home, we offer several other incredible options, too.

Our partial care, outpatient, and extensive outpatient programs allow you to live at home while spending a set number of hours at our facility each week. We will work with you to determine the program that will best suit your addiction and needs before you begin.

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Insurance for Opioid Addiction Treatment

Most major health insurance providers offer some level of coverage for addiction care treatments. If you have health insurance, but are not sure what is covered under your plan, please call our admissions specialist. They will review and verify your insurance for you.

This service is free and will move you past this first step so you can focus on preparing for recovery. If you do not have health insurance, they can also provide you with alternative payment options. Today is the day to choose change.

North Jersey Recovery Center

Addiction is a powerful and chronic disease that builds over time.

You do not have to live this way.

The best way to overcome your opioid addiction is to accept the help, care, and guidance available to you.

Commit yourself to a dedicated long-term approach and put the pieces back together.

Call us today for more information.

Snorting Cocaine North Jersey Recovery Center - A young woman is snorting cocaine off of a table with a dollar bill.

Snorting Cocaine

What if Someone is Snorting Cocaine?

If you have heard of someone snorting cocaine, you may wonder what the effects of the drug are and what the symptoms may be.

Cocaine is an addictive stimulant drug.

Sniffing cocaine is a common way to use, while also making it more powerful.

Snorting cocaine can also be very risky.

What is Cocaine?

Cocaine is a stimulant drug that comes from coca plant leaves.

Historically, there were medical uses for cocaine, but it is now primarily an illegal substance.

When cocaine is purchased on the streets, it is usually a fine, white powder.

Dealers on the black market may mix it with other substances, such as flour or talcum powder, to make it more profitable.

Other times, cocaine is mixed with more dangerous substances like synthetic opioids.

Street names for cocaine include blow, crack, rock, snow, and coke.

How Does Cocaine Affect the Brain?

When you use cocaine, it floods your brain with artificial levels of dopamine.

Dopamine is a feel-good brain chemical associated with reward and movement.

Cocaine prevents dopamine in the brain from being recycled, which results in large amounts of buildup — changing normal neural communication.

Since the brain’s reward center is flooded with dopamine, it reinforces the behavior of taking the drug.

In the short-term, the effects of snorting cocaine can include:

  • Extreme energy and happiness
  • Talkativeness
  • Mental alertness
  • Loss of appetite
  • Inability to sleep
  • Extreme sensitivity to light and sound
  • Irritability
  • Paranoia

The outcomes of using cocaine can vary significantly between users.

Some people find that cocaine makes them more productive. Other people become violent or unpredictable when using cocaine.

For most, the effects of cocaine are somewhat short-lived.

After snorting cocaine, a person will likely feel the effects almost immediately. These effects will usually last up to an hour.

Other physical effects of cocaine include:

  • Dilated pupils
  • Constricted blood vessels
  • Nausea
  • Raised body temperature
  • Increased blood pressure
  • Irregular or rapid heartbeat
  • Restlessness
  • Tremors
  • Muscle twitches

What is Snorting Cocaine?

Understanding how to snort cocaine can give you an idea of some of the effects of the drug.

Small amounts of cocaine are snorted off something like a key. Larger amounts may be put into lines and snorted through something like a straw.

The cocaine enters the bloodstream through the soft tissues of the nose when you snort it. Along with the other risks of snorting cocaine, there are many other side effects.

Snorting cocaine affects nasal tissues. A common symptom is a chronic runny nose. Someone with a cocaine addiction might blame it on a sinus infection.

Eventually, there can be severe damage to the nasal cavity. Snorting cocaine can erode the tissues in the nose and cause deformities. As nasal damage worsens, it can lead to vision damage, brain infections, and spinal infections.

Along with snorting, some of the other ways people use cocaine include smoking, taking it orally, or injecting it. There are complications specific to each method of use.

If you smoke cocaine, it can cause respiratory distress and greater risks of infections, such as pneumonia and asthma. If you consume it by mouth, it can cause bowel decay.

Injecting cocaine can lead to a higher risk of contracting bloodborne illnesses like hepatitis C and HIV.

Other complications of injecting cocaine include soft tissue infections and scarred veins.

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Signs of Cocaine Addiction

Snorting cocaine can lead to an addiction.

Addiction means that your use of cocaine is no longer in your control. Addiction is a chronic brain disease, often requiring professional treatment.

Signs of cocaine addiction can include:

  • Withdrawal from friends, family, or other loved ones, causing problems in relationships
  • Not meeting obligations at school or work
  • Being unable to stop using cocaine, even if wanting to
  • Continuing to use cocaine, despite adverse effects and outcomes

Unfortunately, it is also common for people with cocaine addictions to use other drugs simultaneously.

For example, cocaine and alcohol addictions are common, as are addictions to cocaine and opioids at the same time. This increases the potential for negative health effects.

Mental Illness and Snorting Cocaine

When someone uses cocaine, they may have an underlying mental illness.

This is common and is called co-occurring disorders or a dual diagnosis. One disorder is the addiction itself, and the other is the mental health condition.

If someone has a co-occurring disorder, they need a treatment program to provide specialized care for both disorders.

Treatment for Someone Addicted to Cocaine

If a person is addicted to cocaine or doesn’t feel like they can stop snorting cocaine, treatment options are available.

Behavioral therapy is used as part of addiction treatment programs. This might include Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) or Motivational Incentives.

Many people receive treatment for cocaine addiction at a rehab center, at least initially. There are multiple phases of cocaine addiction treatment.

You might participate in just one, or all of these, depending on the severity of your addiction and your history of substance use.

  • Detox and Withdrawal: If you have been using cocaine for a period of time, you may go through withdrawal when trying to stop using it. Cocaine withdrawal symptoms can last for days or even weeks. Symptoms may include fatigue, slow thinking or brain fog, depression, paranoia, agitation, and cravings. Supervised detox can get you through cocaine detox and withdrawal and reduce the likelihood of a relapse.
  • Inpatient Treatment: During inpatient rehab, you live onsite at a treatment facility. You receive intensive care and your days revolve around your recovery. The environment is safe and stable, which can be beneficial for the recovery process.
  • Outpatient Treatment: An outpatient program provides more flexibility. You can continue living at home and going to work or taking care of your family as normal. Outpatient rehab may be the right choice for someone with a mild addiction or someone with a strong support system at home.
  • Relapse Prevention: Even after your initial treatment program, you have to maintain your recovery and prevent relapse. Recovery is something you take on for the rest of your life. Your treatment plan should include relapse prevention strategies, such as participation in regular therapy or 12-step support groups.
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How Do You Pay for Addiction Treatment?

If you are addicted to cocaine, you must first realize that recovery is a must.

Cocaine addiction can be deadly. It can lead to a number of ill effects in terms of mental and physical health.

Cocaine addiction can also damage your relationships, your career, and your finances. Once you decide treatment is right for you, contact North Jersey Recovery Center.

Our team will go over payment options with you and verify your insurance.

Many people are surprised when they learn health insurance will cover some or all of the costs of behavioral health care and addiction treatment in many cases.

Takeaways: The Risks of Snorting Cocaine

Cocaine often has a reputation as not being as dangerous as other types of drugs.

That’s simply not the reality. Many people’s lives are destroyed because of snorting coke.

Whether you are concerned for yourself or a loved one, seek treatment sooner rather than later.

Addiction is a challenging illness, but with the right care, it is also one that is treatable.

Reach out to North Jersey Recovery Center to learn more.

Speedball Abuse and Recovery - North Jersey Recovery Center - A needle with heroin sits on top of a small pile of cocaine used to make a speedball to inject.

Speedball Abuse and Recovery

What is a Speedball?

A speedball is a mixture of heroin and cocaine, which is taken intravenously or by insufflation.

Heroin and cocaine are illicit drugs that produce opposite effects from one another.

Heroin is an opioid that produces a sense of euphoria while slowing the body down.

It reduces heart rate and decreases breathing.

Heroin and Cocaine – The Effects

Heroin can be felt almost immediately after administration and may last a few hours. Cocaine, on the other hand, is a stimulant that also creates a sense of euphoria.

It produces a sense of increased energy and focus.

Cocaine raises the heart rate, blood pressure, and body temperature.

The effects of cocaine are usually felt within a few seconds and may last between five and 90 minutes.

Both drugs on their own are highly addictive and dangerous.

When heroin and cocaine are mixed to make a speedball, the drugs interact in the body to produce an intense rush of euphoria.

Speedball Abuse and Recovery is vital for anyone with a heroin addiction, and a drug rehab center offers the best chance of recovery.

Speedball Abuse and Recovery

Speedballs ignite activity in your opioid receptors and central nervous system.

They are popular because the stimulant (cocaine) cancels out the depressant’s unwanted side effects (heroin) and vice versa, leaving only the desired effects of both drugs.

However, this may be difficult to achieve, leading you to falsely believe you did not take enough or you have a high tolerance. You may feel compelled to take more speedball so that you can experience the intended recreational purpose.

That is how it is extremely easy to overdose and become lethal. 

You are also at a risk for many dangerous short-term and long-term effects, such as heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure, irregular heartbeat, cognitive impairment, respiratory failure, aneurysm, and damage to the heart, liver, and lungs.

Cocaine wears off faster than heroin, which means the effects of heroin may be more prominent as the time you administered the drug passes. 

Respiratory failure is fairly common when this occurs, even in small amounts of a speedball.

Factors such as the amount of drug administered, route of administration, purity of the drug, mental state, and medical history may determine your experience with speedballs.

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Effects of Speedball Abuse and Dependency

Speedballs can kill in a single-use. You are taking a significant risk every time you use this drug and will experience the signs of speedball abuse much quicker than other drugs.

This is due to the combination of the stimulant and depressant amplifying the effects. The abuse may easily and rapidly turn to dependence, which places you at extreme risk for death.

Signs of speedball abuse include confusion, drowsiness, paranoia, anxiety, impaired coordination, incoherence, and loss of consciousness. If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, you may have a dependency on speedballs. It is important to learn about speedball abuse and recovery.

This dependence leads to major impairments in all aspects of your life. Continued use of speedballs is a serious issue and will lead the body to shut down over time, ultimately resulting in death. Deaths related to speedball overdose have been increasing as the drug becomes more popular in many social circles, including celebrities and musicians.

It is important to seek professional help when attempting to stop using speedballs because withdrawals may result in long-term damage to the body, seizures, coma, and death.

Mental Illness and Speedballs

Approximately half the people with mental illness will abuse drugs to combat the overwhelming symptoms of mental illness.  This is only a short relief from their distress. Using speedballs covers up the true problem and creates more issues, such as further deterioration of your mental health and dangerous physical health problems. Speedball abuse and recovery is important to identify and get help for. 

If you know that you have a preexisting mental illness or illnesses, staying away from drugs is the safest thing to do.  Any psychoactive substance comes with its risks, especially in those with mental illness, who are more susceptible to adverse effects. 

Speedballs can exacerbate mania, depression, anxiety, delusions, auditory and visual hallucinations, psychosis, insomnia, and cognitive problems.  If you have a speedball abuse and dependency problem, you must know that help is available. 

There is always hope for a better future.

Treatment for Speedball Abuse and Dependency

Speedball dependency will take its toll and make you feel trapped.  But you must know that there is a way out and help is available for you.  You are not alone in this. 

Admitting to yourself that speedball dependency has caused many problems in your life and interferes with your ability to live life is the first step to recovery happily. It is a major step, and it is the best thing you can do to begin to reclaim your life.  This is a difficult time in your life, but that does not mean that it is over.  You can seek the help you need. 

Our highly trained staff is dedicated to helping you recover and being that support that you need at North Jersey Recovery Center. You can begin to take your life back from the grip of your dependency with professional and experienced staff who care.   There are many methods for treating speedball dependency and abuse. 

Every treatment is tailored to your needs because we place people first in our center.  It is best to receive inpatient care so that our staff may facilitate safe medical detoxification.  Inpatient detoxification is the first thing we will focus on, so we can ensure your body is cleansed from toxins. 

Medical detox may not be a pleasant experience because of withdrawal symptoms, but our caring staff makes it a top priority that you are as safe and comfortable as possible.  Once the drug has left your system, our treatment will focus on medication-assisted treatment, individual and group therapy, life-skills building exercises, social integration skills, art therapy, support systems, and relapse prevention. 

Please reach out to those who care at North Jersey Recovery Center if you are struggling with speedball dependency and abuse.

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Insurance for Heroin Addiction Treatment and Our Free Insurance Verification

Seeking treatment for your heroin addiction is the best move for your future.  No matter your situation, do not hesitate to contact us for further information. 

At our center, we provide honest and accurate pricing information for all of our treatment options.  We offer free insurance verification. 

Call us today to see if you qualify.

Call Us Today

Today can be the day you begin to break free from the despair of dependency.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, you come first.

You will be greeted with the care you deserve.

Our staff is dedicated to providing only the best treatment available.

Our recovery center understands and respects privacy.

With our location just outside Manhattan, you can receive treatment outside of the city.

Contact North Jersey Recovery Center today and begin living your life again.

How Much Do Drugs Cost: The Steep Price of Addiction North Jersey Recovery Center - An individual is buying drugs off of the street from a drug dealer and realizing how much he is spending on drugs on a daily basis based on a street drug prices chart.

How Much Do Drugs Cost: The Steep Price of Addiction

Street Drug Prices

Street drug prices are a common area of interest in communities where illicit drugs are common.

However, the cost of street drugs is not only financial and does not just impact the individual.

The abuse of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs costs over $740 billion annually.

This number includes costs related to criminal activities, lost work productivity, and addiction-related healthcare.

Drug abusers often face a multitude of costs, whether related to drug-seeking behaviors, crimes, lost wages, or out-of-pocket medical expenses.

But the physical and mental health costs may be the most troubling.

Our comprehensive rehab programs can help you combat these costs.

The Impact of Street Drug Costs

The financial burden for those struggling with drug addiction can be difficult to bear.

To get an idea of this financial burden, you can look at the street drug prices chart for commonly abused drugs.

This is particularly true for young adults who find themselves using drugs to cope with difficult home or family situations.

Recent studies have shown that anywhere from 40% to 70% of homeless youth abuse drugs or alcohol.

This percentage falls between two and three times higher than the rate among non-homeless individuals in the same age range.

For example, cocaine use is four to five times higher among the homeless than the non-homeless.

Similarly, amphetamine use is three to four times higher.

In this same survey, 71% of homeless youth participants met the criteria for substance abuse disorders, whether for alcohol or illicit drugs, or both.

Whether the homelessness or the addiction came first, the connection is there.

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How Much Does Heroin Cost?

Heroin is an illicit substance with no approved medical uses.

Because heroin is not available through prescription or on a drug store shelf, there is no set price or average price for heroin.

However, there are street drug prices charts you can research to give you an idea of the price range for the cost of heroin.

The form, quantity, location, and other factors can alter the cost of this illicit drug.

Heroin tends to be more affordable than many other illicit and prescription drugs.

But this affordability is only one factor of many to consider.

The costs it demands of your physical and mental health are much more significant than the financial costs.

Potent synthetic opioids like heroin and fentanyl are the most lethal category of illicit substances in the United States.

Drug overdoses, fatal and otherwise, occur at alarmingly high rates in this drug category. They outnumber deaths related to firearms, car accidents, suicides, and homicides each year.

But heroin and other synthetic opioids do not have to cost you your life.

We can help you regain control.

The Link Between Heroin and Prescription Opioids

Most heroin addicts did not start with heroin.

About 80% of heroin users report that they had abused prescription opioids first.

These two types of drugs offer many of the same side effects.

But heroin is stronger, more potent, and often more affordable.

When you abuse prescription opioids after receiving them following an injury, childbirth, or a dental procedure, they can quickly lose their effect.

After you have built a tolerance to prescription opioids, you may find yourself graduating to heroin to achieve the effects that have been lost over time with prescription painkillers.

The withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings that come with long-term heroin abuse can be even more difficult to overcome.

You may feel lost, scared, or helpless.

But we can help.

If you are addicted to heroin or prescription opioids, our medical detox eases your withdrawal symptoms and cravings to set you up for success.

Common Street Drugs and Street Drug Prices Chart

Adderall and meth are two common street drugs because they are generally easy to find and affordable.

Many drug abusers take Adderall to increase their focus and concentration.

These side effects make it a popular drug among younger demographics.

It has been nicknamed “the study drug,” but there is no evidence that Adderall use improves test scores or grade point averages.

Heroin, prescription opioids, benzodiazepines, and central nervous system stimulants are high on the list, as well.

Cocaine, hallucinogens, LSD, and marijuana are common among different demographics.

Whichever illicit substances you find yourself abusing, it is important to consider each of the costs, not just the financial ones.

Street drugs are often more dangerous than prescription drugs, but this depends on the individual and several other factors.

Among many others, one reason for this is that street drugs are often mixed with other substances. The drug dealer often does this without the user’s knowledge.

Adding fentanyl to heroin is a common example of this. Combinations like this one instantly increase your risk of overdosing.

Physical and Mental Costs of Abusing Drugs

The costs to your brain, body, career, and relationships are more impactful than the money you will spend to obtain these drugs.

The physical and mental health tolls that they take over time should be your number one priority.

Depending on a wide range of individual factors, like substances abused, the frequency and dose, and your height, weight, and family history, your side effects may range from mild to severe.

You may experience various side effects — from headaches to hand tremors to hallucinations to seizures.

Higher dosages, increased frequencies, polysubstance addictions, and addictions with underlying mental health disorders may each come with more severe side effects.

Many side effects of drug abuse involve worsening or developing mental health disorders.

If you are experiencing adverse side effects, contact your doctor or another medical professional as soon as possible.

If you are interested in seeking professional and high-level care before your side effects become worse, contact our facility.

We walk you through the steps involved in attending a drug rehab program, enforcing early sobriety, overcoming withdrawals, and everything that comes next.

Rehab Treatment Options

Depending on the specifics of your addiction, mental health, and other needs, we work with you to build a program that will best suit your needs.

Your customized care program will be as unique as you are.

These care programs combine proven therapeutic methods with comprehensive techniques for care, support, and guidance that are genuinely patient-focused.

Some of these program options may include:

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Paying for Addiction Treatments

The cost of treatment is a factor that keeps many people in need of professional help from seeking the addiction care they deserve.

But paying for addiction treatment may be easier than you would think.

If you have health insurance, your treatment may be partially or fully covered.

Most major health insurance providers offer coverage for these types of treatments to some degree.

If you are unsure what is covered under your policy, please call our admissions department.

They will review and verify your insurance for you.

If you are coming to us without health insurance, they can also outline alternative payment options.

North Jersey Recovery Center

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we help you work toward lasting sobriety for a healthier and happier life.

Our goal is to provide each person we meet with individualized, high-quality, and comfortable care.

See the difference that a dedicated team and proven therapeutic techniques can make.

You do not have to face your addiction alone. It is time to try things a better way.

Call us today for more information.

Ecstasy Symptoms and Warning Signs

What is Ecstasy?


Ecstasy is a psychoactive drug with abuse potential, and it can be dangerous or deadly.

Ecstasy symptoms are frequently seen among young people, particularly in the festival or party scene.

What Happens if you use Ecstasy?

Also known as MDMA or molly, ecstasy changes perception and mood.

Perception includes the awareness of one’s environment and the objects around them.

Ecstasy has a chemical structure similar to hallucinogens and stimulants.

MDMA was popular in the rave scene, and it recently starting surging in popularity again.

Ecstasy can be taken as a tablet or pill. There are also powder and liquid forms.

The nickname molly, in particular, refers to the pure crystalline powder form of ecstasy.

Along with ecstasy risks, the drug is often combined with other substances that users are not aware of.

For example, when authorities seize molly, it often includes methamphetamine, cocaine, ketamine, and even bath salts.

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Ecstasy Symptoms and How to Tell If Someone is on Molly

When someone takes ecstasy, it will increase the activity of three brain chemicals, which are:

  • Dopamine: When someone takes ecstasy, it can increase their activity and energy levels due to dopamine. Dopamine also reinforces behaviors by activating the reward system, which is how ecstasy can be addictive or habit-forming.
  • Norepinephrine: When ecstasy affects this brain chemical, it increases blood pressure and heart rate.
  • Serotonin: Serotonin is the brain chemical responsible for appetite, sleep, mood, sexual arousal, and many other functions. There is a large amount of serotonin released by the brain when someone uses ecstasy. The result can be artificial feelings of emotional closeness and connection, empathy, and an elevated mood.

Ecstasy side effects start to appear relatively quickly, and these effects last three to six hours.

When it comes to how to tell if someone is on molly, outward signs and symptoms might include:

  • Nausea
  • Involuntary teeth clenching
  • Chills
  • Sweating
  • Irritability
  • Impulsivity
  • Aggression
  • Depression
  • Sleep disturbances
  • Anxiety
  • Attention and memory problems
  • Reduced appetite
  • Increased extroversion

Ecstasy, since it is a stimulant, can lead to high amounts of physical activity.
When someone takes high doses, ecstasy can cause problems in how the body regulates temperature.

One of the most serious negative effects of ecstasy is called hyperthermia, which is a significant increase in body temperature. Even moderate amounts of ecstasy may interfere with your body’s ability to control its temperature.

Untreated hyperthermia can lead to muscle breakdown, electrolyte imbalances, kidney failure, and brain swelling.

Is Ecstasy Addictive?

Ecstasy is not addictive in the same way that something like opioids is, but that does not mean there is no abuse potential. Ecstasy affects the same neurotransmitters as other addictive substances and activates the brain’s reward cycle. That reward cycle is what triggers the development of an addiction.

Research indicates that regular ecstasy use can lead to changes in the dopamine and serotonin symptoms associated with substance use disorder.
People who regularly use ecstasy sometimes report symptoms of addiction, such use the drug despite negative consequences, tolerance, cravings and withdrawal.

Mental Illness and Ecstasy Symptoms

As with other substances, there is often a relationship between mental illness and ecstasy.

Someone with an existing mental illness may be more likely to use substances like ecstasy. This often occurs because of a desire to self-medicate and deal with mental health symptoms like anxiety or depression.

Since ecstasy symptoms impact brain chemicals, the substance can also make mental illnesses worse or even cause previously undetected symptoms to arise.

When someone seeks treatment for an addiction or substance abuse problem, their mental health needs to be addressed as well. This might include a treatment plan with certain medications and counseling.

Ecstasy Treatment

If someone feels their use of ecstasy is out of control, they might seek addiction treatment. An addiction treatment program aims to help someone deal with their addiction’s underlying components and then avoid relapse as they return to their daily life.

Addiction treatment should be customized to the individual’s needs, but there are some different types of programs available.

Medical Detox

First, when you stop using a substance your body is dependent on, you will likely experience withdrawal. Withdrawal symptoms can be physical and psychological.

Sometimes withdrawal can be severe or even deadly. During medical detox, a person’s withdrawal symptoms are medically managed, and they receive clinical care as necessary.

Medical detox can be an important part of the treatment process because it reduces the risk of relapse and mitigates the medical side effects of withdrawal.

Inpatient Treatment

Inpatient treatment for ecstasy or other substances involves living onsite and receiving comprehensive, around-the-clock care and treatment in a safe and supportive environment.

In inpatient treatment, you are solely focused on recovery. You do not have to think about outside influences or triggers. This type of drug rehab allows you to get a fresh start.

Your day will often include a combination of group and individual therapy, medication management, and supplemental therapies.

Partial-Care Programs

Uniquely, North Jersey Recovery Center offers partial-care programs with a low staff-to-client ratio and high-quality clinical care.

These programs are somewhere in the middle between inpatient and outpatient rehab. Someone participating in a partial-care program might receive treatment four to six hours a day, five times a week.

It is possible to begin your treatment journey with partial-care, but they might first complete residential inpatient rehab for others.

Intensive Outpatient Programs and Traditional Outpatient Rehab

Outpatient treatment programs can vary in intensity and required time commitments, but you do not live onsite.

This means you can continue working and keeping up with your daily responsibilities, but you are also working to maintain your recovery. Outpatient treatment can be something you use to establish long-term recovery management plans.

No matter the specifics of your treatment program, therapy plays a central role. Therapy is a way to look beyond the surface of your addiction and uncover some of the causes and patterns in your life. Therapy also provides you with the tools you can utilize as you return to your daily life.

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Insurance for Ecstasy Addiction Treatment

Too often, people let concerns about how they’ll pay for rehab prevent them from getting the treatment they deserve, and that could potentially save their life. Insurance can and often does cover the majority of addiction treatment costs.

Our admissions team at North Jersey Recovery Center can verify your insurance coverage and work with you on the details of paying for treatment. The costs of not going to treatment can be much higher.

Ecstasy Symptoms and Treatment

Ecstasy, also known as MDMA or molly, is a serious drug.

Ecstasy symptoms can range from being energetic and emotional to potentially deadly such as experiencing hyperthermia.

While ecstasy isn’t addictive in the traditional sense, it does affect the brain in the same ways as other addictive drugs.

If you are struggling with ecstasy or other substances, North Jersey Recovery Center can help.

We are close to New York City and give you seclusion and privacy as you are on a path to recovery.

Demi Lovato’s Relapse

The Harrowing Story of What Addiction Does, and How You Can Overcome It

Addiction touches the lives of billions around the world.

Many of us suffer quietly with drugs and do not admit it because of the stigma surrounding addiction.

We do not want to be labeled “junky,” “addict,” or “dopehead.”

We fear judgment from others as being weak and lacking self-control.

Demi Lovato’s admission of addiction broke the barrier that holds so many of us, prisoners, to our addiction.

We fear what others will say or think.

Drug addiction is real, and it devours those from all walks of life, including pop stars.

You are not alone.

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Does Our Past Cause Addiction?

Demi Lovato was robbed of a normal childhood because of her father’s own struggle with addiction to drugs and alcohol.

She remembers his drunken rages and violent outbursts.

Now 25-year-old Demi recalls being a depressed child often consumed with thoughts of death.

She often played out a scenario in her mind of what her funeral would be like.

At the age of 5, Demi began modeling and competing in beauty pageants.

She dove headfirst into acting and singing when she appeared on “Barney and Friends.”

Her school years were jaded by the taunting and bullying she endured.

Demi was called all kinds of names, and one that impacted her life was being labeled “fat.”

She made a vision board with pasted cutouts of slim celebrities she wanted to be like.

As a result of being called fat, Demi developed bulimia—frequently binging on food and purging it afterward.

She was later recruited by Disney Channel, where she starred on “As the Bell Rings” and “Camp Rock.”

At the age of 15, Demi began touring with the Jonas Brothers.

The lifestyle of acting while singing on the road became immensely overwhelming.

She was under immense stress to maintain a squeaky-clean life while being flexible enough to become a pop singer.

The stress Demi was under, coupled with her eating disorder and her father’s addiction, weighed heavily on her.

All while suffering from depression, things started to unravel.

At the age of 17, Demi had her first hit of cocaine. Her first time trying it was scary, but she began to love how it made her feel.

She began drinking alcohol and doing more cocaine.

As the stress of touring and acting increased, she started taking Adderall to help her keep up.

With drugs, alcohol, depression, and bulimia combined, she was at an explosive point in her life.

She was diagnosed with bipolar disorder, which helped explained the highs and lows she was experiencing.

Those around her noticed a change in her personality, such as her angry outbursts.

Demi Lovato’s addiction was so bad that she admitted to carrying bags of drugs around because she craved them.

Her manager got her help, but she managed to fake drug tests and find ways to keep using.

She can remember a day when she had used cocaine, Xanax, and alcohol and was unsure if she would overdose.

Demi Lovato’s rehab kept her sober for six years.

While sober, she found that she was still just as miserable as she was when she used drugs.

The team of people managing her controlled everything from what she ate to what she would wear.

She became overwhelmed and relapsed by drinking alcohol.

Later that night, she went out with friends and used drugs.

It was three months after her relapse that she overdosed and ended up in the hospital.

Demi had a sudden realization that she needed help.

She went back into rehab and has since lived a clean life that she is proud of.

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Demi Lovato’s Addiction and Mental Disorders

Demi Lovato’s addiction intensified her bulimia, bipolar disorder, depression, anxiety, and suicidal tendencies.

Likewise, her existing mental disorders fueled her abuse of drugs. 

She was caught in a vicious cycle that led to her addiction.

Drug Abuse Leads to Addiction

Flirting with drugs often opens the door to addiction.

All it takes is one time to get you hooked. Demi Lovato’s drug addiction is an example of this.

Demi’s addiction to cocaine happened the moment she “just tried” it.

She liked the way it made her feel. 

When we are swimming in emotional pain, we want to feel better.

When drugs provide that outlet, guess what? We take it.

How does Demi Lovato’s addiction mirror our own?

The moment we “try” drugs, we begin a downward spiral just like Demi did. 

Do you want to continue down that road the Demi Lovato was on, or do you want to be like her and grab your life back?

Get Help!

Take the first step and admit you have a problem.

Do not let the stigma of drug addiction stand in the way of you regaining control of your life.

Demi Lovato’s drug addiction story shows us just how dangerous drug abuse is.

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How do you get treatment?

  1. Admit you need help.
  2. Call a professional because once you become dependent on drugs because you cannot tackle it alone. When you attempt to go the DIY route with treatment, you set yourself up for relapse.
  3. You will go through an intake process and a health screening.
  4. Instructions will be provided to you on which facility to go to.
  5. You will meet with therapists, counselors, and medical specialists who develop a tailored treatment plan.
  6. As an inpatient, you will go through detox to clean your body of all substances. This is done either through social methods or medically.
  7. Once you are stable, you will go to our “partial hospitalization” program, where you will continue treatment as a resident while easing back into your everyday life. The next step in the program is “outpatient.”
  8. As an outpatient, you will attend scheduled visits for treatment. If you need to schedule those visits around your busy life, we understand. We offer intensive outpatient therapy for such occasions.


Payment and Insurance

 
Our staff is more than happy to verify your insurance on your behalf to make things easier for you.

You also have the option to use our online verification form to do it yourself.
 

A Clean Life is a Great Life

We hope that sharing Demi Lovato’s addiction story with you is convincing enough to encourage you to get help.

Do what is best for you, regardless of what others might say about addiction.

Do not let them have control over the opportunity to live a clean and fabulous life!

Contact us at North Jersey Recovery Center today.

Mental Illness and Addiction: Which Came First? North Jersey Recovery Center - A woman is comforted by an experienced psychiatrist to determine which dual diagnosis she has, and whether the mental health disorder caused the substance abuse or vice versa

Mental Illness and Addiction: Which Came First?

Mental Health and Addiction

Mental illness, sometimes known as a mental disorder, may be defined as a health condition that changes the way you think, feel, behave, or some combination of all three.

This may, in turn, cause you distress and difficulty in functioning.

Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, and Depression

The most common types of mental illness include bipolar disorder, anxiety disorder, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and dementia.

Mental illness may range from severe to mild, and the symptoms may be different depending on the illness and the affected person.

Some symptoms could include confusion, excessive fear and worries, low energy, mood swing, extreme anger and hostility, suicidal thinking, and antisocial behavior.

Addiction is a Chronic Compulsion

Addiction is a chronic compulsion to take a substance or behave a certain way.

Addiction is the way your body yearns for a substance or behavior, especially if there is a reward attached to it without fear of the consequences.

When you have an addiction, you will be unable to or find it highly challenging to stay away from the substance or behavior.

Addiction can include a chemical or behavioral addiction.

Chemical addiction is the addiction to substances such as alcohol, opioids, and nicotine. It may be referred to as substance-use disorder.

On the other hand, behavioral addiction is an addiction to compulsive behavior.

Examples of behavior addiction include gambling addiction, shopping addiction, sex addiction, television addiction, and food addiction.

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Dual Diagnosis

A dual diagnosis was identified for the first time in the 1980s and is commonly referred to as a co-occurring disorder. 

A dual diagnosis occurs when you have both a mental illness and an addiction to a substance.

People who suffer from substance use disorder, which is the addiction to drugs and alcohol, often suffer a co-occurring mental illness.

It is usually thought to be the cause of the addiction. Though they occur together, this does not imply that one is always the cause of the other; it may be challenging to find out which came first.

A dual diagnosis condition may occur as a result of: 

  1. Mental illness which contributes to a substance use disorder. Substance use may be a way for people with mental illness to deal with the illness to feel better, which may lead to an addiction.
  2. Addiction caused by mental illness. Substance abuse may abnormally change how a person’s brain functions, thereby changing the way the person thinks, feels, or behaves.
  3. Mental illness and substance use disorder occur simultaneously due to common risk factors such as stress, trauma, and genetics.

A dual diagnosis can add to the complexity of treatment and recovery and is prone to relapses instances.

The impact of dual diagnosis on people may be an increased violence, suicidal behavior, antisocial behavior, among others.

Mental Health and Substance Abuse

Mental health is the absence of mental illness.

Your mental health affects how you behave, feel, think, how you interact with others and the environment, and how you handle stress.

Mental health plays an essential role in the overall health of a person.

Substance abuse occurs when you use substances such as drugs and alcohol in a way that is inappropriate and may be harmful to your overall health.

Such practices include taking more than the regular dosage of a drug.

In the case of substance abuse, you may abuse drugs and alcohol to ease stress and to feel good, but you can still exert control on yourself.

Continual substance abuse can and usually leads to substance addiction.

On the other hand, substance addiction is more compulsive, it involves a lack of control over your actions and disregard for the repercussions of taking those harmful substances.

You become dependent on the substance.

Those with mental health issues such as depression and anxiety disorder have a high chance of getting addicted to drugs and alcohol. In turn, substance abuse and addiction can lead to mental illness.

Effects of Mental illness

There are several effects of mental illness on a person. They include:

  1. Alienation: the knowledge that you have a mental illness may lead to stigmatization and isolation by others in society.
  2. Suicide: mental illness may cause sadness and anger as well as suicidal thoughts. A person with mental illness may resort to suicide.

Effects of Addiction

Substance abuse and addiction may have short-term and long-term effects on an individual, and these effects vary depending on the substance a person is addicted to.

They include:

  1. The weakening of the immune system, which would lead to increased risks of contracting illness and infections
  2. Paranoia and hallucination
  3. Heart conditions, such as abnormal heart rates and risk of infection. For example, substances such as cocaine can damage the heart and lead to a heart attack
  4. Lung disease: substances that you inhale and smoke may damage your respiratory system and cause lung failure and disease
  5. Seizures, stroke, and brain damage
  6. Short attention span, problems with memory, and poor decision making.
  7. Loss of self-control and aggressiveness
  8. Mental illness, such as depression and anxiety disorder
  9. Death as a result of an overdose

Treatment for Addiction

Addiction is a chronic disease that has affected the lives of many people.

However, it is not a disease that cannot be cured.

The length of time it takes for various people to get better is different, and it is primarily determined by how long an individual has been addicted.

People often need long-term or repeated care to overcome their addictions and return to their healthy lives. 

The addiction treatment often comprises a combination of group and individual therapy sessions that teach the people in recovery the skills needed to stay sober and return to their healthy lives.

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However, behavioral therapy is one of the most common components used during substance abuse rehabilitation.

Alongside therapy and counseling, medication is also used in many addiction treatment protocols.

These medications may be used to help reduce cravings and ease off withdrawal symptoms.

In the case of co-occurring mental or medical health issues, medications are used to treat these problems.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we offer some of the best treatment types.

Some of these include Inpatient Rehab, Outpatient Rehab, and Evidence-Based treatments, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), that are utilized for both drug and alcohol rehab. 

Highly trained professionals administer these treatments.

Payment Methods and Free Insurance Verification

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we have multiple payment methods that will help you and your loved ones get the quality help you deserve.

We accept most PPO insurance, private pay options, and we also offer payment plans.

At your request, we can contact your insurance provider to make arrangements that will help us serve you better.

Contact North Jersey Recovery Center Today

Our team at North Jersey Recovery Center comprises highly trained professionals who want to see you and your loved ones happy and healthy.

We understand how delicate rehabilitation can be and we have our doors wide open to give you the help you need.

National Recovery Month - New Jersey Recovery Center

National Recovery Month – Education & Celebration

With September being recognized as National Recovery Month, it is a time to reflect on the gains that individuals who have previously struggled with addiction and mental health issues have made in their journeys to recovery.

In addition, it is also a time to spread awareness on the extreme impacts that drug and alcohol addiction and mental health disorders have on millions of individuals worldwide. In fact, many people suffer from what is known as a dual diagnosis, where they may turn to addictive substances or unhealthy behaviors due to mental health disorders they are struggling with.

For the loved ones of those struggling with addiction, education is key to provide sufficient support and resources during their treatment process.

Celebrating Connections for 2020’s National Recovery Month

Often, there is a stigma that comes along with the word “addiction”. This is one of the reasons why September was designated as National Recovery Month over 20 years ago – to break this stigma and educate the public on the various aspects of addiction and mental health.

Celebrating Connections is this year’s theme for 2020’s National Recovery Month in order to emphasize the importance of both support systems and spread awareness for addiction, abuse, and mental health disorders.

As part of National Recovery Month, there are four key components surrounding aspects of awareness that remain focal points:

  • Behavioral – When you think of wellness, most people tend to think of their physical well-being. However, mental health and behavioral health are a critical part of one’s overall health and well-being. This includes aspects such as psychological and emotional well-being as well. Many times, people will turn to addictive substances or harmful behaviors to deal with their declining behavioral wellness.
  • Prevention – In order to prevent alcohol and drug abuse or addiction, it is essential that individuals are educated and informed on the various addictions, disorders, treatments, and programs. This allows a person to make an educated decision on what his or her next steps may be based on factual information and evidence-based studies and research.
  • Treatment – Initially, those struggling in these areas were hesitant to seek treatment because of the negative stigma with addiction and mental health disorders. However, over the recent years and advancements made within treatment programs, more and more individuals are getting the help they need to live an addiction-free life. Each individual has a different treatment plan based on his or her needs and requirements. These success-driven treatment plans are created by professional, licensed, and experienced rehabilitation facilitators.
  • Recovery – There is no doubt that treatment works when the commitment and effort are there. Millions of individuals all over the U.S. have grown to live a healthy life of sobriety after completing their respective treatment program and following any aftercare, such as outpatient programs, group meetings, counseling, and so on.
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The Importance of Recovery

The organization Faces & Voices of Recovery is a non-profit that advocates for recovery and treatment.

They have put together a website that provides a range of tools and resources for users to download in support of National Recovery Month.

With the pandemic that has completely shaken up the world this year, recovery is now more important than ever. Increased use of drugs and alcohol has significantly climbed due to COVID-19 with more people stuck at home – potentially causing an uptake in urges and triggers to use. Because of this, loved ones must be able to provide effective support for those struggling with addiction and mental health disorders.

We are also seeing an increase in substance abuse and mental health issues with teenagers and adolescents in the U.S. It is crucial that the public is well-informed on the dangers of addiction and undiagnosed mental health disorders, so we can do our part to support our youth and prevent further harm from occurring.

By spreading awareness on addiction and mental health, we are helping to break the stigma for those that require inpatient treatment or outpatient treatment to improve their quality of life.

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You Have Our Support & Encouragement

No one should have to go through addiction alone.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we are here for you no matter what type of struggles you may be dealing with. Whether you are located in Manhattan, New York City, Newark, Clifton, or the surrounding areas. If you are looking for an addiction treatment center in the Northeast, we are here and ready to help as we take in those struggling with addiction from all over the United States.

If you or a loved one is struggling with heroin, cocaine, pills, alcohol, or another type of substance addiction, our professional team of rehab facilitators offers a clinical approach to help you during your path of recovery. Give us a call today at 800-741-3300.

From group sessions to one-on-one counseling to proper medication, we are here to provide you with the support and resources you need to regain control of your life.

Let treatment do its job and help you move on to a better, healthier, and happier life.

Dual Diagnosis

Dual Diagnosis: The Most Common Co-Occurring Disorders

Dual diagnosis refers to the formal diagnosis of simultaneous mental health and substance use disorders. Professionals also refer to this condition as comorbidity, co-occurrence, or co-occurring disorders. Either illness can develop first, but drug and alcohol use can exacerbate symptoms of mental health issues. Treating both disorders together is crucial for lasting recovery. So reach out to North Jersey Recovery Center for guidance today.

Mental Illnesses Widely Seen with Addiction

Psychiatric illnesses rarely manifest in isolation. Further, it is quite common for a person to experience more than one mental health condition in addition to a substance use disorder. People with mental illness may also struggle with addiction to more than one substance. 

Possible combinations of these disorders are innumerable, but some appear more often than others. Common mental health disorders often found co-occurring with addiction include:

Depression and Cocaine Addiction

About 10% of the US population struggles with major depression, and at least one-third of them misuse substances such as cocaine. The most common types of depression are:

  • Major depression – extreme sadness, lethargy, and irritability lasting more than two weeks.
  • Atypical depression – chronic depression that may be temporarily alleviated by good news but quickly reverts to a severely “low” state.
  • Dysthymia – a persistent “gloomy mood” lasting more than a year that can lead to major depression.
  • Seasonal affective disorder – mood changes, anxiety, and sleep problems associated with seasonal changes.

Cocaine is an extremely addictive stimulant, spiking production of the “reward” neurotransmitter dopamine to induce temporary euphoria. This artificial stimulation makes the brain produce less dopamine and alters brain chemistry, causing users to develop a tolerance and craving for more to feel normal. Cocaine use can also impair the function of brain cells by up to 20%, which may be irreversible.

Cocaine abuse and withdrawal can lead to more severe depression and fuel a cycle of increased cocaine use in an attempt to feel better. Researchers are unsure of which comes first, but these conditions clearly intensify each other. Treatment usually involves medication with antidepressants and must be carefully supervised by a physician.

Attention-Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD) and Alcohol Abuse

ADHD is characterized by hyperactivity and chronic inattention. The disorder may result from a smaller or less-active frontal lobe of the brain. This region of the brain is responsible for thinking, attention, memory, organization, and problem-solving. People with ADHD also have lower levels of dopamine in their brains than people who don’t have ADHD, so they might use alcohol to make up the deficit.

Alcohol is a depressant that many ADHD sufferers use to calm down, but it often exerts the opposite effect. This substance affects the brain’s frontal lobe, too, impeding clear thinking. Thus, when a person with ADHD is impaired by alcohol consumption, they are prone to wild, uncontrollable emotions and behaviors. 

About 1 in 4 adults who seek treatment for addiction also have ADHD. Some of them have used alcohol or drugs to self-medicate. However, ADHD symptoms can arise subsequent to the onset of alcoholism. Our team of caring therapists and counselors at North Jersey Recovery Center can help you determine which illness came first and pursue healthy coping skills for long-term sobriety.

Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Opioid Addiction

PTSD is a severe anxiety disorder brought on by trauma such as sexual abuse, military combat, catastrophe, or accident. Most people who experience sudden, shocking or frightening events develop short-term symptoms, but PTSD lasts more than a month and becomes debilitating with recurrent flashbacks, scary thoughts or dreams, and being easily startled. People with PTSD often battle depression or other anxiety disorders along with substance abuse.

Studies link PTSD with opioid use and chronic pain conditions. Some researchers believe that PTSD patients may have lower pain thresholds and endogenous opioid levels due to a disruption in the endogenous opioid system. Other experts posit that pain and PTSD could influence each other, aggravating the symptoms of each other.

PTSD patients have higher rates of opioid prescriptions. This exposure to opioid analgesics increases the risk of developing an addiction. Easy access presents temptations for diversion and misuse, and the proliferation of cheaper illicit opioids make these drugs difficult to resist. Mounting evidence associates opioid abusers with high rates of PTSD; people diagnosed with this illness are three times more likely to suffer from opioid use disorder.

Bipolar Disorder and Alcohol

People with bipolar disorder typically experience a mixture of manic and depressive episodes. They often feel out of control of their lives and turn to alcohol to escape their uneasiness. Individuals who were mentally stable before addiction can develop this condition as excessive alcohol or drug abuse changes the brain reward system and other parts of the brain that regulate mood and behavior.

Research suggests that people with bipolar disorder are up to seven times more likely to have an addiction. Almost half of individuals with bipolar disorder also misuse alcohol. This inadvertently intensifies the symptoms of bipolar disorder. Alcohol makes manic episodes more severe, which feels pleasurable to many people with this illness. It can also induce a seductively sedative effect.

Schizophrenia and Marijuana Addiction

Marijuana abuse is common in individuals with schizophrenia. This drug appears to produce many symptoms similar to a schizophrenic episode. Studies indicate that people who smoke high-potency marijuana daily are at five times the risk of developing psychosis as people who have never smoked. Those with pre-existing genetic or other vulnerabilities are even more susceptible to psychiatric illness connected with marijuana use.

Researchers have discovered that individuals who use marijuana and carry a variant of a gene that affects dopamine signaling are at a greater risk of developing schizophrenia. Marijuana use also worsens psychotic symptoms in those who already have the mental disease. The age at first use and the amount consumed affect the onset or progression of schizophrenia as well. 

Eating Disorders and Appetite Suppressants

About 24 million people suffer from an eating disorder such as anorexia, bulimia, or binge eating disorder. About 64% of them misuse over-the-counter and prescription weight loss pills. Many people do not think that appetite suppressants are addictive. However, these substances are widely abused for their hunger-reducing and fat-burning properties. People with food-related mental illness also frequently abuse laxatives, diuretics, emetics, amphetamines, cocaine, and heroin.

Certain personality traits such as perfectionism and impulsiveness have been linked to both eating and substance use disorders. Disordered eating may develop as a symptom of depression or another mental illness as well. Eating issues and addiction share common risk factors such as low self-image, family history, social pressures, and brain chemistry disruptions.

The Prevalence of Dual Diagnosis 

Since the 1980s, multiple studies have documented the prevalence of co-occurring disorders. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health reported that over 9 million Americans aged 18 and older struggled with concurrent mental and substance use disorders in 2018. In that year, substance use was more widespread among individuals who experienced mental health issues such as mood, anxiety, or social disorders. 

Unfortunately, less than half of these people received treatment of any kind. Only about 7% were able to access treatment for both concurrent conditions. Untreated, a person with dual diagnosis is especially vulnerable to serious consequences such as:

  • Aggression
  • Increase risky sexual activity
  • Low quality of self-care
  • Physical health problems
  • Suicide

Addiction Is a Mental Illness, Too

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, addiction is a mental illness in itself. Substance use disorder is a complex disease marked by behaviors that arise from drug-induced alterations in brain structure and function, such as compulsive craving and using despite the consequences. These changes happen in some of the same areas of the brain that are impacted by psychiatric conditions such as anxiety or depression.

Diagnosis and treatment for co-occurrence can be complicated because it is difficult to assess the overlapping symptoms of addiction and mental illness. Nevertheless, it is essential, as failure to treat both conditions places a person at a greater risk of relapse.

Gender May Play a Role

Research suggests that gender is a factor in some patterns of co-occurrences. For instance, males tend to struggle with antisocial personality disorder along with drug dependence and misuse substances more than females. On the other hand, females experience mood and anxiety disorders more, putting them at a higher risk of developing an addiction.

Why Does Addiction Often Accompany Other Mental Illnesses?

In many instances, people resort to alcohol and/or drugs to cope with symptoms of mental illness. For instance, someone struggling with depression turns to illicit drug use to suppress their emotional turmoil. Another person with anxiety may try an opiate as a sedative, and they may quickly develop a dependence on the drug.

In other cases, an individual develops mental health problems as a result of substance use. Since drugs alter brain chemistry and function, so a person could begin struggling with depression as their body increasingly craves alcohol or a drug. Since addiction and many mental health disorders present similar symptoms, an addict could be unaware of a concurrent psychiatric condition.

Why Is Dual Diagnosis Treatment Important?

Mental disorders can largely affect how a person receives addiction treatment. Also, many people who have co-occurrences tend to deny or downplay their substance use. Sequential treatment, attempting to address one issue at a time, is often ineffective for long-term sobriety. For example, if a person receives treatment for heroin addiction but doesn’t get treatment for an underlying anxiety disorder, they might turn back to heroin when they feel anxious again.

Dual diagnoses call for integrated care to get to the root of both conditions and work through them. However, finding help that addresses comorbidities can be a challenge because few rehab facilities have established dual diagnosis treatment programs. At North Jersey Recovery Center, you can be assured that you’ll get a customized treatment plan to help you achieve sobriety and mental wholeness.

Treatment for Dual Diagnosis in New Jersey

Mental health disorders, including addiction, are complex diseases requiring comprehensive treatment. Since the illnesses often trigger one another in an individual, just dealing with one allows the other to fester and make it harder for a person to stay mentally stable and clean. The most effective rehab programs address the patients’ medical, nutritional, and psychological needs to increase the chances of a more complete recovery.

Inpatient Treatment

If you or your loved one is battling addiction and mental illness, please ask us about inpatient care at North Jersey Recovery Center. Attempting to wean yourself from drugs or alcohol without professional help can be extremely dangerous, even fatal. You may need to undergo detox under medical supervision. We monitor you and provide the care necessary for safe withdrawal.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we provide a secure facility that removes you from the normal triggers and temptations you wrestle that drag you into deeper mental anguish and substance use. In our structured environment, you participate in intensive substance abuse education. You will learn valuable coping and relationship skills that will benefit you for the rest of your life.

As we create your custom recovery plan, we include a variety of individual and group therapies. We offer psychiatric sessions, family counseling, vocational training, and self-care lessons as well. Along with therapy, your treatment professional may prescribe medications to manage your mental health issue. These might include antidepressants, antipsychotics, or anxiolytics.

Questions to Ask Your Treatment Provider

The care a person receives at an addiction rehabilitation center has an enormous influence on recovery and lasting sobriety. Finding a reputable, capable provider is essential, yet many people don’t know what to look for in a treatment facility. In your search, ask a potential provider these questions to ensure that you or your loved one gets the services they need:

  • Does the facility have experience with dual diagnosis?
  • Does the facility provide detox?
  • What types of treatment modalities are available, such as cognitive-behavioral therapy or medication-assisted treatment?
  • Does the facility create individualized plans?
  • What is the staff-to-patient ratio?
  • What are the staff credentials?
  • Who supervises the therapists and workers?
  • How many individual and group therapy sessions will there be?
  • Will the facility accept my insurance?
  • Would there be any additional costs not covered by my insurance plan?
  • How does a person transition after completing treatment?
  • How are families involved in treatment?
  • What support is there for families?
  • Does the facility have empirical data showing the program’s effectiveness?

Get Help for Dual Diagnosis in New Jersey

All too often, people seeking help with concurrent mental illness and addiction have been advised to complete an addiction rehab program before going into a separate mental health facility. However, research increasingly supports implementing a simultaneous, coordinated effort for both conditions to improve adherence to treatment. At North Jersey Recovery Center, we tailor our innovative addiction recovery programs to address your dual diagnosis and facilitate healing.

A one-size-fits-all program simply won’t work for someone with a dual diagnosis. Your story is your own, and your recovery process should be as well. We at North Jersey Recovery Center would be honored to help you write a new chapter of victory and freedom for your life.

The types, lengths, and severity of mental illness and addictions differ with every person facing these issues, so effective rehabilitation must account for all these factors. Contact us to learn more.