Lean (Purple Drank) Addiction and Abuse North Jersey Recovery Center - What is lean? Here is an image of cough syrup that many end up becoming addicted to because they mix many different elements that cause a euphoric feeling.

Lean (Purple Drank) Addiction and Abuse

What is Lean?

If you are unfamiliar with common illicit substance combinations, you may wonder: What is lean? What’s in lean? And why is it so dangerous?

Lean, sometimes known as “purple drank,” combines powerful cough medicines with other easy to find ingredients — like candy or soda.

The cough medicine is also sometimes mixed with alcohol.

Combining cough syrup and candy is a relatively new practice in the world of substance abuse.

With its powerful base of opiate cough medicine, lean can lead to many troubling consequences.

If you are addicted to lean, our rehab programs can help.

Lean as a Drug

Codeine, a powerful opiate, is the lean drug that makes it so dangerous.

Cough medicines containing opiates are potent and powerful.

Lean is made when certain cough medicines are mixed with hard, fruity candies or bubbly soft drinks.

The resulting recreational drug cocktail is addictive and dangerous.

One of the most troubling concerns is the presence of other active ingredients in the prescription cough medicine that may interfere with the codeine.

Other Active Ingredients in Codeine-Based Cough Medicines

Some prescription cough medications that contain codeine also contain antihistamines that act as sedatives.

When abused, taken in high doses, or mixed with other substances, this combination can impair your motor functions.

Other cough syrups may include narcotics that produce feelings of relaxation or high or psychoactive ingredients that alter your mind.

With strong ingredients like these, abuse is incredibly dangerous.

Ingredients that produce such potent effects are often addictive, leading to physical dependence, withdrawal symptoms, and drug cravings.

But your lean addiction is not something that you have to face alone.

Help is right around the corner.

Lean Drink

What is lean?

The buzz around lean drink and the attention it has received from prominent celebrities have only contributed to its dangerousness.

The codeine in lean drinks acts as a cough suppressant and a pain reliever.

This particular pain reliever should be taken under the care, recommendation, and instruction of a medical professional and an individualized prescription.

If you were given a prescription for codeine, it is likely because you have mild to moderate pains that are unresponsive to less potent or non-prescription pain relievers, like Advil.

But prescriptions are abused every day, and many prescription drugs can be purchased or traded illicitly.

And many individuals choose to abuse prescription-strength cough medications.

Side Effects of Abusing Lean

Because the cough medications used to make lean drink contain different opiates, narcotics, and strong antihistamines, this drink can cause a wide variety of unpleasant or dangerous side effects.

Over time, it can impair your mental and physical health.

This illicit concoction is popular among younger demographics, although it is not the most common addiction within this group.

The most common addictions among college students include alcohol, benzodiazepines, marijuana, stimulants, and ecstasy.

Still, many young people have suffered both short and long-term damage to their health after abusing lean.

The side effects that you experience may vary depending on several individual factors.

The amount you drink each time, how often, and the cough medicine you use can alter your side effects.

But some side effects are more common than others.

These include:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Sedation
  • Headaches
  • Stomach pain
  • Difficulty urinating
  • Feelings of agitation or confusion
  • Fevers and sweats or shivering
  • Severe muscle stiffness and twitches
  • Nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea
  • Coordination problems
  • Rashes, hives, and itching
  • Vision changes
  • Hallucinations
  • Seizures

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The Dangers of Mixing Codeine and Other Substances

Codeine is habit-forming.

It has the potential to lead to life-threatening side effects.

When you mix it with other substances, it becomes increasingly dangerous.

Mixing a potent and addictive opiate with fillers like candy and soda may make it taste better, but it also makes it easier to forget how much you have ingested.

This can lead to dangerous levels of codeine, narcotics, or antihistamines traveling through your system.

These high levels increase your chance of overdosing.

Mixing lean drink ingredients with alcohol takes it to another level.

This can cause respiratory depression, which reduces the amount of oxygen getting to your brain.

Liver damage, coma, and death are linked to respiratory depression.

There is some evidence that certain famous pop culture icons and rappers have suffered impairments due to their lean abuse.

These impairments include hospitalization for seizures, near-death experiences, and arrests.

High-profile athletes have also made the news after they were suspended or hospitalized for their lean abuse.

If you are struggling with lean abuse, do not wait for your addiction, side effects, or cravings to get worse.

Call us today.

Mental Health and Lean Addiction

What is lean, and what does it have to do with mental health?

The ingredients in lean slow your brain activities and create euphoric, relaxed feelings.

Drugs with mind-altering effects of this kind are capable of damaging your mental health.

Abusing lean can lead to brain lesions and memory loss, uncharacteristic changes in your behavior, and other troubling cognitive impairments with long-term use.

Permanent psychosis is also possible.

If you have a pre-existing mental health condition when you start drinking lean, it may become worse.

Dual diagnosis is the term for co-existing mental health disorders and addictions.

The best way to improve your addiction, mental and physical health when you have a dual diagnosis is to treat them simultaneously.

Our dual diagnosis program is comprehensive and highly specialized.

It provides a holistic, well-rounded approach to improving every aspect of your health.

Lean Drink Withdrawal Symptoms

Most codeine-based cough medicines contain multiple ingredients that alter your brain chemistry.

One way it does this is by tricking it into producing more dopamine, the feel-good chemical produced by your brain’s reward system.

Unnatural increases in this chemical can lead to addiction, drug cravings, and a loss of control.

One clear sign of addiction is that you see the damaging toll drugs are taking on your life but cannot stop using the drugs.

Drug cravings can be persistent and overwhelming.

Withdrawal symptoms can lead to relapse if you are not prepared for them.

Codeine withdrawal symptoms can range from nausea, vomiting, and insomnia to agitation, anxiety, and body pains.

Thankfully, an initial part of our addiction treatment programs includes a supervised medical detox.

This type of detox eases your withdrawal symptoms and cravings to set you up for success.

Addiction Treatment Options

We believe each treatment program should be customized according to the individual’s needs.

There are no one-size-fits-all solutions when it comes to addiction care.

We offer various addiction treatment options, from full-time inpatient care to part-time outpatient options to sober living and more.

Each program is uniquely designed to address your addiction, concerns, health, questions, and peace of mind.

From our first phone call to when you feel ready to step back into the real world, we work with you to determine the treatment options that best suit your needs.

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Paying for Addiction Treatments

When it comes to paying for addiction treatments, health insurance is a tremendous resource.

Your health insurance provider may offer full or partial coverage for your addiction treatments.

If you are unsure of what your coverage entails, please call our admissions department.

They will review and verify your insurance for you.

If you do not have insurance, they will also outline alternative payment options for you.

North Jersey Recovery Center

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we specialize in high-level, customized addiction care.

We meet you where you are in your recovery journey and help you get to where you need to be.

We are with you through every step of this process.

Here, you will build all of the resources, tools, knowledge, skills, and support systems you need to pursue a different life.

And you will do so while receiving ongoing care, support, and guidance.

Call us today to get started.

How Much Do Drugs Cost: The Steep Price of Addiction North Jersey Recovery Center - An individual is buying drugs off of the street from a drug dealer and realizing how much he is spending on drugs on a daily basis based on a street drug prices chart.

How Much Do Drugs Cost: The Steep Price of Addiction

Street Drug Prices

Street drug prices are a common area of interest in communities where illicit drugs are common.

However, the cost of street drugs is not only financial and does not just impact the individual.

The abuse of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs costs over $740 billion annually.

This number includes costs related to criminal activities, lost work productivity, and addiction-related healthcare.

Drug abusers often face a multitude of costs, whether related to drug-seeking behaviors, crimes, lost wages, or out-of-pocket medical expenses.

But the physical and mental health costs may be the most troubling.

Our comprehensive rehab programs can help you combat these costs.

The Impact of Street Drug Costs

The financial burden for those struggling with drug addiction can be difficult to bear.

To get an idea of this financial burden, you can look at the street drug prices chart for commonly abused drugs.

This is particularly true for young adults who find themselves using drugs to cope with difficult home or family situations.

Recent studies have shown that anywhere from 40% to 70% of homeless youth abuse drugs or alcohol.

This percentage falls between two and three times higher than the rate among non-homeless individuals in the same age range.

For example, cocaine use is four to five times higher among the homeless than the non-homeless.

Similarly, amphetamine use is three to four times higher.

In this same survey, 71% of homeless youth participants met the criteria for substance abuse disorders, whether for alcohol or illicit drugs, or both.

Whether the homelessness or the addiction came first, the connection is there.

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How Much Does Heroin Cost?

Heroin is an illicit substance with no approved medical uses.

Because heroin is not available through prescription or on a drug store shelf, there is no set price or average price for heroin.

However, there are street drug prices charts you can research to give you an idea of the price range for the cost of heroin.

The form, quantity, location, and other factors can alter the cost of this illicit drug.

Heroin tends to be more affordable than many other illicit and prescription drugs.

But this affordability is only one factor of many to consider.

The costs it demands of your physical and mental health are much more significant than the financial costs.

Potent synthetic opioids like heroin and fentanyl are the most lethal category of illicit substances in the United States.

Drug overdoses, fatal and otherwise, occur at alarmingly high rates in this drug category. They outnumber deaths related to firearms, car accidents, suicides, and homicides each year.

But heroin and other synthetic opioids do not have to cost you your life.

We can help you regain control.

The Link Between Heroin and Prescription Opioids

Most heroin addicts did not start with heroin.

About 80% of heroin users report that they had abused prescription opioids first.

These two types of drugs offer many of the same side effects.

But heroin is stronger, more potent, and often more affordable.

When you abuse prescription opioids after receiving them following an injury, childbirth, or a dental procedure, they can quickly lose their effect.

After you have built a tolerance to prescription opioids, you may find yourself graduating to heroin to achieve the effects that have been lost over time with prescription painkillers.

The withdrawal symptoms and drug cravings that come with long-term heroin abuse can be even more difficult to overcome.

You may feel lost, scared, or helpless.

But we can help.

If you are addicted to heroin or prescription opioids, our medical detox eases your withdrawal symptoms and cravings to set you up for success.

Common Street Drugs and Street Drug Prices Chart

Adderall and meth are two common street drugs because they are generally easy to find and affordable.

Many drug abusers take Adderall to increase their focus and concentration.

These side effects make it a popular drug among younger demographics.

It has been nicknamed “the study drug,” but there is no evidence that Adderall use improves test scores or grade point averages.

Heroin, prescription opioids, benzodiazepines, and central nervous system stimulants are high on the list, as well.

Cocaine, hallucinogens, LSD, and marijuana are common among different demographics.

Whichever illicit substances you find yourself abusing, it is important to consider each of the costs, not just the financial ones.

Street drugs are often more dangerous than prescription drugs, but this depends on the individual and several other factors.

Among many others, one reason for this is that street drugs are often mixed with other substances. The drug dealer often does this without the user’s knowledge.

Adding fentanyl to heroin is a common example of this. Combinations like this one instantly increase your risk of overdosing.

Physical and Mental Costs of Abusing Drugs

The costs to your brain, body, career, and relationships are more impactful than the money you will spend to obtain these drugs.

The physical and mental health tolls that they take over time should be your number one priority.

Depending on a wide range of individual factors, like substances abused, the frequency and dose, and your height, weight, and family history, your side effects may range from mild to severe.

You may experience various side effects — from headaches to hand tremors to hallucinations to seizures.

Higher dosages, increased frequencies, polysubstance addictions, and addictions with underlying mental health disorders may each come with more severe side effects.

Many side effects of drug abuse involve worsening or developing mental health disorders.

If you are experiencing adverse side effects, contact your doctor or another medical professional as soon as possible.

If you are interested in seeking professional and high-level care before your side effects become worse, contact our facility.

We walk you through the steps involved in attending a drug rehab program, enforcing early sobriety, overcoming withdrawals, and everything that comes next.

Rehab Treatment Options

Depending on the specifics of your addiction, mental health, and other needs, we work with you to build a program that will best suit your needs.

Your customized care program will be as unique as you are.

These care programs combine proven therapeutic methods with comprehensive techniques for care, support, and guidance that are genuinely patient-focused.

Some of these program options may include:

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Paying for Addiction Treatments

The cost of treatment is a factor that keeps many people in need of professional help from seeking the addiction care they deserve.

But paying for addiction treatment may be easier than you would think.

If you have health insurance, your treatment may be partially or fully covered.

Most major health insurance providers offer coverage for these types of treatments to some degree.

If you are unsure what is covered under your policy, please call our admissions department.

They will review and verify your insurance for you.

If you are coming to us without health insurance, they can also outline alternative payment options.

North Jersey Recovery Center

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we help you work toward lasting sobriety for a healthier and happier life.

Our goal is to provide each person we meet with individualized, high-quality, and comfortable care.

See the difference that a dedicated team and proven therapeutic techniques can make.

You do not have to face your addiction alone. It is time to try things a better way.

Call us today for more information.

How Long Do Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System? North Jersey Recovery Center - A man is sitting in bed taking another dose of his benzodiazepines to achieve the effect he first had when he initially took the medication for his anxiety.

How Long Do Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

Many individuals want to know: “How long do benzodiazepines stay in your system?” They might want to know so they avoid taking too much and possibly overdosing. Or, they might need to know because they take other medications that could become dangerous if combined with benzos. Then there are those who might be taking them recreationally and want to know in order to pass a drug test.

Regardless of the reason, knowing how long benzos stay in your system can be the difference between life and death. Let’s take a look at what benzodiazepines are, how they work, how long they stay in the system, and how you can get help for benzodiazepine addiction.

What are Benzodiazepines?

Before we talk about the effects of benzos, it’s important to understand what exactly they are. Benzodiazepines are a class of drug that is typically obtained by a doctor’s prescription. They tend to be prescribed in order to treat anxiety, panic disorders, and, in some cases, even insomnia. Common benzos include:

  • Xanax
  • Valium
  • Libirum
  • Etazolam
  • Restoril

How Do Benzodiazepines Work?

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When a person takes a benzodiazepine drug, it creates a calm and relaxing effect in their brain. That’s because the benzo attaches itself to the GABA receptors, thus calming brain activity. By calming the brain, it can reduce the feeling of anxiety or panic, allowing the brain and body to relax.

In addition to its relaxing and calming effects, there are other possible side effects that are commonly associated with benzodiazepines. These include:

  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness
  • Depression
  • Confusion
  • Impaired coordination
  • Headaches
  • Vision problems

Prolonged use of benzodiazepines can lead to dependence, addiction, and, in extreme cases, overdose and death. Overdose can occur when taking too much of the substance for an extended period of time, or when it is combined with other substances that also slow down the central nervous system, such as opioids.

That’s why it is so important to take benzodiazepines only as medically directed. If you have been prescribed any medications, it is important to remember the following:

  • Take your prescription only as medically directed and follow the directions on the bottle.
  • Ask your doctor what you should do in the event that you miss taking a dose. 
  • Let your doctor know of any other medications, vitamins, or supplements you may be taking.

What Affects How Long Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

Now that we have talked about what they are and how they work, it’s time to address how long benzodiazepines stay in your system. The biggest factor is the type of benzo that you take. There are short-acting, medium-acting, and long-acting benzodiazepines and all of them stay in your system for different amounts of time. 

Xanax is the longest-acting of all the benzos. If you were to take a Xanax, peak levels would occur in your blood about 1-2 hours after taking it. The typical half-life for an average adult is around 11 hours. This means that approximately 11 hours after taking a Xanax, half the drug has been eliminated from your system.

In order to clear approximately 98% of the drug from your system, it would take 5 half-lives or approximately 55 hours. That means, for an average adult, it could take anywhere from 2 to 4 days for just 1 dose of Xanax to be completely eliminated from your system. 

As far as how long it can stay in your urine for a drug test, those numbers tend to differ. For a short-acting benzodiazepine, it could show up in a urine test for up to four days. It can show up in a blood test for up to 24 hours and in saliva for up to two and a half days. A longer-acting benzodiazepine could show up in a drug test even longer.

Are There Additional Factors That Contribute to How Long Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

In addition to the type of drug you take, there are other factors that can play a key role in how long a benzo drug can stay in your system. Some of these factors include:

  • Age Typically, the younger you are, the healthier you are. You are also less likely to be on multiple medications. This can mean that your body may eliminate benzodiazepines faster than someone older. While the average half-life for Xanax is around 11 hours in healthy, young adults, it can go up to 16 hours in seniors.
  • Alcohol Use – If you combine benzo drugs with alcohol, it can lead to fatal consequences. It can also take longer for the drug to leave your system.
  • Ethnicity – Some ethnic backgrounds have demonstrated longer elimination times for drugs. 
  • Organ Problems – Organs, especially the liver, play an important role in eliminating substances like benzodiazepines. If you have a condition such as chronic liver disease, it’s harder for your body to break down and eliminate certain substances.
  • Weight – If you’re overweight or have a higher percentage of body fat, it’s harder for your body to break down substances, including benzodiazepines, leading to a longer half-life.
  • Metabolism – If you have a higher metabolism or are physically active, you may see that benzodiazepines stay in your system for a shorter time period.
  • Frequency and Duration of Usage – If you frequently use benzodiazepines, your body can take longer to eliminate the substances in your system.

Getting Help for Benzodiazepine Addiction

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If you are struggling with benzodiazepine addiction, you aren’t alone. There are treatment programs available for people of all ages and all levels of addiction.

The first step in the treatment process is medical detox. In order to truly recover from benzodiazepine addiction, you must first rid yourself of not just the benzos but all harmful substances in your system. During medical detox, your symptoms can be safely managed in a controlled environment by a trained medical professional. Detox can be done at either a hospital or medical facility, a dedicated detox facility, or a treatment center that also offers detox services such as North Jersey Recovery Center. Attempting to self-detox can be dangerous and even life-threatening. 

Following medical detox, the next step is to begin addiction treatment. This can be done by entering either an inpatient or outpatient treatment program. Determining the type of program that is best for you depends on the severity of your addiction and any other addictions to other substances. If you have a co-occurring mental health disorder, you might need a more intensive treatment program, such as inpatient rehab.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we offer a wide variety of treatment programs. Some of the treatment programs that we offer include:

No matter what treatment program you enroll in, you will have a team of compassionate and trained professionals who create personalized treatment plans for you and your needs. Following treatment, you should have plans for relapse prevention during your recovery. This might include having a recovery coach or participating in 12-step programs regularly.

Getting Treatment for Benzo Abuse and Addiction

When answering the question of how long benzos stay in your system, it’s important to consider the following:

  • You can expect a half-life of five hours or less for ultra short-acting benzodiazepines.
  • Short- and intermediate benzodiazepines have a half-life ranging from 5 to 24 hours.
  • Long-acting benzodiazepines have half-lives that are 24 hours or more.

To learn more about caring and effective addiction treatment programs, call North Jersey Recovery Center today. We will answer any questions you may have and provide you with information about program options. We can also verify your insurance coverage and work with you each step of the way for admissions and during treatment and recovery.

Controlled Substances Act and Drug Scheduling North Jersey Recovery - Image of handcuffs, a spoon with white powder in it and a heroin needle.

Controlled Substances Act and Drug Scheduling

What to Know About Controlled Substances

Is alcohol a controlled substance? Is it covered in the Controlled Substances Act?

How are controlled substances classified, and what does the term mean?

These are all common questions people have.

In simplest terms, controlled substances refer to the addictive potential a substance has.

Not all addictive substances are controlled, however.

An Overview of Controlled Substances

Controlled substances are considered illicit drugs that can negatively affect someone’s health and well-being and are covered under the Controlled Substances Act.

If you have a controlled substance and you’re caught by law enforcement, you may face legal penalties, including fines or prison time.

The federal government classifies substances as controlled substances under the Controlled Substances Act of 1970.

There are five categories in the Controlled Substance Act, which are often related to the potential for substance abuse to occur.

These categories of controlled substance class are:

  • Schedule I: These substances are considered to have no acceptable medical use in the U.S. and high abuse potential. Examples of Schedule I controlled substances are ecstasy, marijuana, heroin, and LSD.
  • Schedule II: This controlled substance class includes stimulants and narcotics considered to have high abuse potential, but they have medical uses in the U.S. too. Schedule II substances include opioids like methadone, codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, and stimulants like amphetamine.
  • Schedule III: These substances have less of an abuse potential than substances classified as Schedule I or II, but there is still a risk of psychological and physical dependence. Schedule IV substances include ketamine, anabolic steroids, and medicines with low doses of codeine.
  • Schedule IV: A Schedule IV controlled substance is one with a lower abuse potential than I-III substances. Schedule IV substances include benzodiazepines like Xanax and many prescription sleep aids.
  • Schedule V: A Schedule V drug has a low potential for abuse. Most Schedule V drugs contain a small amount of narcotics, such as cough syrup with codeine.

It is technically illegal to possess any controlled substance, but if you have a prescription and lawfully purchased one, you are exempt from this law.

The government regulates controlled substances because of their addictive and harmful potential effects in manufacturing, distribution, possession, and use.

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Is Alcohol a Controlled Substance?

The brief answer is no; alcohol is not a controlled substance under the Controlled Substances Act. With that being said, alcohol still has a high potential for abuse and addiction. Alcohol is one of the most commonly abused substances around the world.

While alcohol isn’t a controlled substance, it is a regulated one. There are laws regarding the use of alcohol. For example, the legal age to drink alcohol is 21, and you cannot legally drink and drive.

Abuse of Controlled Substances

Since controlled substances are considered to be inherently addictive, they are frequently abused. Opioids are one example of a highly abused controlled substance.

There are both Schedule I and II opioids that are drugs of abuse. Schedule I opioids include heroin, which is entirely illegal. Schedule II opioids include prescription pain relievers. Often, since something is prescribed, there is a misconception that it is somehow safe or not harmful.

Prescription opioids prove otherwise. In addition to being highly addictive, prescription opioids can also lead to fatal overdoses. Some people who abuse prescription opioids they eventually move to other more dangerous types of opioids like heroin or fentanyl.

What starts as legitimate use can spiral into problematic opioid use very quickly.

Mental Illness and Controlled Substances

There are links between mental illnesses and the use of controlled substances. For some people, the use of controlled substances may stem from an attempt to self-medicate and deal with symptoms of anxiety, depression, or other mental health conditions. Controlled substances can also contribute to mental illness.

The links between controlled substances and mental illness are a big reason why addiction treatment relies on therapy. Therapy can be in both a group and individual setting, and it’s a key part of relapse prevention.

Treatment for Abuse of Controlled Substances

If someone is struggling with controlled substance abuse, treatment is available. Treatment can happen in different settings and formats. What is most important is that rehab is personalized to the individual.

The following are some of the types of programs that can treat an addiction to controlled substances.

Medical Detox

When someone regularly uses controlled substances such as opioids, they can become dependent on them. If you’re dependent on a substance and stop using it suddenly, it can cause withdrawal symptoms.

Withdrawal symptoms can range from mild to severe, depending on how long you used the substance, how heavily, and your overall health. Medical detox provides a clinical environment as you go through withdrawal. This can keep you safe and support you.

If necessary, you may receive medications to lessen the symptoms of withdrawal you experience.

Inpatient Rehab

There are varying intensities of inpatient rehab. These programs can last for 28 days, up to several months or more. The commonality between inpatient rehab programs is that you live onsite during your treatment. This helps you leave behind your environment of substance abuse and be in a supportive environment.

You can focus entirely on your recovery in inpatient treatment. Inpatient treatment can also include different types of complementary treatments that help you holistically.

Outpatient Rehab

Outpatient treatment may be a step down from inpatient care, or if you have a mild or short-term addiction to a controlled substance or alcohol, you could do the outpatient treatment.

Outpatient treatment allows you to work on your sobriety and recovery but continue living at home and keeping up with daily responsibilities. Some outpatient treatment programs require a significant time commitment, while others are fairly limited and informal.

Outpatient rehab can also be something you participate in for an extended time as you re-enter your daily life.

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Can You Use Insurance for Rehab?

If you’re considering rehab for a controlled substance, alcohol, or perhaps both, there are payment options available. At North Jersey Recovery Center, we can likely work with your insurance company.

We can verify your coverage for free, which will help you financially plan for your treatment.

Our admissions team can also help you explore other payment options if needed. Above all else, getting the help you need and deserve should be a priority.

Is Alcohol a Controlled Substance? Final Thoughts

The answer to “is alcohol a controlled substance” is no, but that does not make alcohol any less dangerous or addictive.

Controlled substances include prescription and illicit drugs. Alcohol is a regulated but not controlled substance in the U.S.

Controlled substances addiction and alcohol addiction can occur separately from one another or together.

If you would like to learn more about addiction treatment, reach out to North Jersey Recovery Center.

We offer tailored, effective treatment programs in a serene, private setting.

Outpatient Rehab for Drug Addiction North Jersey Recovery Center - A woman participates in a one-on-one counseling session at home with a professional rehab facilitator as part of her Outpatient Treatment Program

Outpatient Rehab for Drug Addiction

To maximize your chances of beating substance addiction, you may need outpatient rehab.

This form of treatment is available in various programs unless you require more intensive treatment at an inpatient facility.

We can help you find an outpatient program that is just right for you.

What Is Outpatient Treatment?

Outpatient care is a live-at-home approach to drug treatment.

It allows you to maintain at least part of your normal, daily routine.

However, it also requires you to make regular visits to your outpatient facility.

The three types of outpatient treatment programs are:

• Standard Outpatient Programs (OPs)

Intensive Outpatient Programs (IOPs)

• Partial Hospitalization Programs (PHPs)

Each of these program types is meant for people in specific kinds of circumstances.

In addition, each program type requires a different level of weekly attendance.

Standard OP Treatment Programs

Standard OPs are meant for people with relatively mild or moderate drug problems.

To qualify for this level of care, you must:

• Be free of any severe physical or mental health problems

• Have only a limited number of drug abuse and/or drug addiction symptoms

Participants in standard OPs attend treatment sessions for under nine hours a week.

IOP Treatment Programs

Intensive outpatient care is designed for people more seriously affected by drug problems, but not so seriously as to qualify for residential or inpatient care.

In addition, IOP patients must not have any additional mental or physical health problems.

People enrolled in IOPs receive more treatment than people in standard OPs.

In this kind of program, you’ll receive at least nine hours of treatment each week.

The upper limit for weekly IOP attendance is 19 hours a week.

PHP Programs

Like people in IOPs, people in PHPs have fairly serious drug problems.

However, they still don’t have problems that make them the ideal fit for inpatient care.

PHPs differ from IOPs in two important ways:

• First, people enrolled in PHPs have unstable health caused by physical or mental issues.

• Second, participation in a PHP also requires a more significant time commitment. At a minimum, you’ll spend 20 hours a week getting treatment in this kind of program.

How Outpatient Rehab Works

Outpatient rehab for substance abuse has two parts or phases:

• The first phase is a drug detox.

• The second is active drug treatment.

Outpatient Drug Detox

Drug or Alcohol Detox is the common shorthand for detoxification.

When you detoxify, you stop your uncontrolled use of drugs or prescription medications.

As a result of this change in intake, you will probably experience some form of drug or medication withdrawal. The type of withdrawal you experience depends on the type of substance you are addicted to.

Outpatient detox is based on the same basic principles as inpatient detox.

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It begins with an assessment of your substance use and overall health.

When this assessment is done, you will start actively detoxing from the drugs and medications in your system.

Compared to people in inpatient programs, people in outpatient programs do not typically experience severe withdrawal symptoms.

However, this is not always the case. For this reason, outpatient detox requires you to check in with your doctor during your weekly visits.

During your check-ins, you may receive medication to help lessen your withdrawal symptoms.

This is especially true for people recovering from opioid or benzodiazepine addiction.

It’s also common to receive help in the form of drug counseling.

Outpatient Drug Treatment

Outpatient detox gets you to the first milestone in your recovery: Initial Sobriety.

However, experts agree that lasting sobriety requires follow-up enrollment in active outpatient drug rehab.

All people recovering from drug problems should receive behavioral therapy as part of their treatment plan.

In addition, some people receive treatment in the form of safe and prescribed medication.

Behavioral therapy works by helping you change how you think and act when it comes to drugs.

There are therapy options available for all types of drug and medication addiction.

For instance, if you are in recovery for stimulant abuse or addiction, your options may include:

The Matrix Model, which can make it easier for you to maintain abstinence

• Community reinforcement approach (CRA), which helps you learn to value sober living

If you’re recovering from opioid abuse or addiction, your options may include:

• Community reinforcement approach

• Contingency management, which can motivate you to meet your treatment goals

• 12-step facilitation, which can strengthen your desire to join a self-help group

Medication use in outpatient drug treatment is mostly limited to people with opioid problems.

For example, if you’ve established abstinence, your doctor may prescribe a treatment called Naltrexone.

Naltrexone helps you steer clear of future opioid use by stopping opioids from reaching your brain.

Outpatient-Rehab-for-Drug-Addiction-280367363

Who Should Get Outpatient Treatment for Drugs?

Should you seek outpatient treatment for your drug problems?

The answer to that question depends on the details of your current situation.

Your situation will also help determine which level of outpatient care you receive.

If you’re in generally stable health and have only mild or moderate addiction symptoms, you may qualify for a standard outpatient program.

If you’re in stable health but have more serious symptoms, you may qualify for an IOP.

People with both serious drug problems and unstable health may qualify for a PHP.

Like many people, you may start out in one kind of program before switching to another.

For example, if you improve in an IOP, you may drop down to a standard OP.

On the other hand, if you don’t get better in a standard OP, you may need to transition into an IOP or even a PHP.

How Long Does Outpatient Treatment for Drug Addiction Last?

The time needed to recover in outpatient drug rehab varies from person to person.

This is true, in part, because of individual differences in substance use.

It’s also true because not all people enroll in the same kinds of programs.

A general time frame of one to three months is common. However, you may or may not fall within this range.

Where Can You Find Outpatient Rehab for Drug Addiction?

The chances are that several types of programs offer local outpatient treatment in your area.

Some of these programs may operate independently in dedicated facilities.

Others may function as part of a larger healthcare provider.

Outpatient programs in your area may also provide other kinds of addiction services in the same location.

Payment Options for Outpatient Rehab for Drug Addiction

Like most Americans, you may have health insurance that includes drug treatment.

However, not everyone has access to this convenient coverage.

As an alternative to insurance, you can use cash or credit resources to pay for your care.

To ease this potential financial burden, look for programs that allow you to make scheduled payments.

Get More Information on Outpatient Rehab for Drug Addiction

Your options for outpatient drug rehab include standard OPs, IOPs, and PHPs.

The right program for you depends on your unique, personal circumstances, and the type of rehab you need dictates how much weekly treatment you receive.

If you require partial hospitalization, you’ll spend at least half of each weekday in care.

Weekly treatment time in IOPs falls somewhere between nine and 19 hours.

People in standard OPs only spend eight hours or less in treatment each week.

Behavioral therapy is the most common treatment choice for outpatient drug rehab.

If you suffer from opioid addiction, your plan may also include medication.

Outpatient rehab in your area may be based in standalone facilities or form part of a larger healthcare center.

In addition, it may focus exclusively on outpatient care or offer additional services.

To pay for your time in treatment, you can use insurance or other convenient payment methods.

For more information on how you can enroll in outpatient drug rehab, contact North Jersey Recovery Center today at 877-786-0572.

stages of alcohol detox

What are the Stages of Alcohol Detox?

Alcohol detoxification is the process that your body goes through when ridding itself of toxins built up through long-term consumption of alcohol. Detox is generally the first step of any treatment program for alcohol addiction. 

Depending on the individual and the severity of the addiction, the exact alcohol detox process will vary. Alcohol detox can be generally divided into three stages. Each stage differs in the intensity of withdrawal symptoms.

It is understandable to become slightly overwhelmed by learning about alcohol detox and the process of getting clean. We’d like to encourage you to view this journey as a healing process. Although it is challenging, the long-term gain is much more rewarding. 

What is Alcohol Addiction?

Before we define the stages of alcohol detox, we must first understand what alcohol addiction is. Alcohol addiction, also referred to as alcoholism, is the most severe form of alcohol abuse. Those that struggle with alcohol addiction often feel as though they cannot function daily without alcohol. 

Consequently, this leads to interpersonal and physical issues that worsen over time. Career goals, personal matters, relationships, and overall health are all part of the equation that becomes affected.

Alcohol addiction must be recognized, and help must be sought after. Leaving addiction alone will only worsen its symptoms. Alcohol abuse can be recognized by some common symptoms, such as: 

  • Experiencing temporary blackouts or short-term memory loss
  • Exhibiting signs of irritability and extreme mood swings
  • Making excuses for drinking such as to relax, deal with stress, or feel normal
  • Choosing to drink over important responsibilities or priorities 
  • Becoming isolated and distant from loved ones
  • Drinking alone or in isolation
  • Feeling hungover when not drinking
  • Change of appearance (i.e. unkempt, untidy appearance)
  • Change of company (new group of friends you hang out with)

Fortunately, there are many components of treatment to overcome alcoholism. Treatment programs at a rehab such as North Jersey Recovery Center aim to guide you through the entire recovery process. From therapy to medical care, your needs will be met each step of the way.

What is Alcohol Withdrawal?

Experiencing alcohol withdrawal is a tell-tale sign that your body and brain have become dependent on alcohol. Alcohol withdrawal alters the body’s response when a person suddenly stops drinking after prolonged and heavy alcohol use. As a result of long-term use, both the body and the brain become dependent on drinking frequency and patterns. 

Quitting “cold-turkey” results in your body not being able to readjust to functioning without alcohol quickly. This adjustment period causes the discomforting side effects of alcohol withdrawal, like shakes, insomnia, nausea, and anxiety. It is important to emphasize that this is temporary. Through alcohol detox and treatment, withdrawal symptoms alleviate, and you’ll find significantly improved health living a sober life.

Alcohol detox at a rehab facility under medical supervision is crucial. This is mainly due to the life-threatening health complications that can arise during alcohol detox. A rehab center will ensure your safety during detox with the right medication if necessary, as well as 24/7 support.

Symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal 

Alcohol withdrawal syndrome (AWS) is the term that refers to symptoms that occur when a heavy drinker suddenly stops or significantly reduces their alcohol intake. These symptoms range from physical to emotional. They can include anything from mild anxiety and fatigue to nausea. 

During alcohol detox, symptoms of AWS are monitored and treated throughout the entire process. Symptoms of AWS include, but are not limited to:

  • Tremors
  • Anxiety
  • Nausea
  • Headache
  • Irritability
  • Insomnia
  • High blood pressure

These symptoms may worsen, which is why we strongly urge individuals to undergo alcohol detox at an accredited rehab facility. The most severe form of withdrawal syndrome is known as delirium tremens (DT). DT can include signs and symptoms of:

  • Extreme confusion
  • Extreme agitation
  • A fever
  • Seizures
  • Tactile hallucinations, such as having a sense of itching, burning, or numbness that isn’t taking place
  • Auditory hallucinations or hearing sounds that don’t exist
  • Visual hallucinations, or seeing images that don’t exist

Severe AWS symptoms are a medical emergency. A high fever, hallucinations, and heart disturbances are all reasons to seek immediate help and call 911. Addressing alcohol addiction will help you to avoid the worsening of symptoms over time.

Treating Alcohol Withdrawal: The Timeline of Alcohol Detox

The symptoms of alcohol withdrawal take place in three main stages during alcohol detox. These three stages go from mild symptoms to severe. However, as the detox process comes to an end, you’ll find yourself feeling much better and like your normal self again. It may be a process, but it’s a process that’s well worth it. 

To reiterate, AWS produces a broad range of symptoms that typically follow a timeline. These symptoms start between 6 and 24 hours after the last drink and can range in severity. 

Stage 1: Mild Symptoms

Mild symptoms will arise within about 6 to 8 hours of the alcohol detox process. These symptoms include fairly minuscule physical disturbances, as well as changes in behavior and mood. These symptoms can be similar to those of a hangover, so it is essential not to look past them. For an individual that has consumed a lot of alcohol for a substantial amount of time, it is crucial to address these symptoms. 

The first symptoms of withdrawal include:

  • Anxiety
  • Visual and auditory hallucinations
  • Convulsions
  • Whole-body tremor
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Insomnia
  • Profuse sweating
  • Shakiness
  • Hypertension
  • Heart failure

Stage 2: Moderate Symptoms

As the withdrawal symptoms from stage one of the alcohol detox begin to alleviate, the symptoms of the second stage will start to take place. The second stage of withdrawal is more serious. It typically begins within 12 to 24 hours of the last drink. However, it can take as long as three days for these symptoms to settle in. 

The symptoms of the second stage include:

  • Higher blood pressure
  • Respiration
  • Fever
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Confusion
  • Sweating
  • Irritability

Stage 3: Severe Symptoms

Patients tend to experience severe symptoms between 48 to 72 hours into detoxification. The most severe effects include delirium tremens and seizures. One of the most dangerous aspects of these effects is that they can occur without a warning sign.

Approximately 3-5% of patients will experience DTs. This is why medical supervision during alcohol detox is crucial, not just recommended. Our priority is to keep you safe and comfortable as you continue along the recovery journey.

The third state includes symptoms of:

  • Hallucinations
  • Fever
  • Seizures
  • Confusion
  • Agitation

It’s important to keep in mind that this timeline differs depending on each unique person. The best way to keep track of the alcohol detox process is to have it monitored by a team of trained professionals. Alcohol detox is the first step of a sober and fulfilling life.

Drugs Used in Alcohol Detox

Medication will be administered during alcohol detox when necessary. If that’s the case, our medical staff will ensure that everything is done carefully and safely. Part of the alcohol detox process includes keeping the patient’s system in balance and avoiding major physiological upsets. Some examples of medications used are:

  • Librium
  • Ativan
  • Tranxene

Benzos are commonly used to alleviate alcohol withdrawal symptoms and prevent alcohol withdrawal seizures. Seizures are one of the most common causes of fatality in alcohol withdrawal, so additional anticonvulsant drugs, such as Keppra, are often used as well.

Treatment After Alcohol Detox

Once alcohol detox is completed, the next part of the recovery journey begins. Depending on your situation and the severity of the addiction, the program will vary. However, no matter the treatment, all of our patients receive the same core, quality treatment. 

Inpatient rehabilitation, otherwise known as residential treatment, is one of the most common ways to treat alcohol addiction. In an inpatient rehab program, the patient resides at the treatment facility for the full duration of the program. Most programs last anywhere from 20 to 90 days but can be longer if needed.

One of the main benefits of inpatient rehab is 24/7 access medical professionals during alcohol detox, as well as after. Each day will have a structured routine and include a variety of different methods towards treating alcohol addiction.

These methods include cognitive behavioral therapy, support groups, one-on-one therapy sessions, and much more. Residential treatment removes all distractions and environmental triggers by placing you in a supportive and healthy community. 

Seek Help Today!

Alcohol addiction does not need to control your life any longer. Alcohol detox is the first step in reclaiming your life and finding fulfillment again. We believe in personalized treatment for each patient’s unique circumstances. 

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we have many alcohol treatment resources to help you along the journey. Our team of expert physicians, psychologists, and other medical professionals are eager to help you change your life. Please don’t hesitate to reach out to us here for more information about alcohol detox and corresponding treatment programs.