Controlled Substances Act and Drug Scheduling North Jersey Recovery - Image of handcuffs, a spoon with white powder in it and a heroin needle.

Controlled Substances Act and Drug Scheduling

What to Know About Controlled Substances

Is alcohol a controlled substance? Is it covered in the Controlled Substances Act?

How are controlled substances classified, and what does the term mean?

These are all common questions people have.

In simplest terms, controlled substances refer to the addictive potential a substance has.

Not all addictive substances are controlled, however.

An Overview of Controlled Substances

Controlled substances are considered illicit drugs that can negatively affect someone’s health and well-being and are covered under the Controlled Substances Act.

If you have a controlled substance and you’re caught by law enforcement, you may face legal penalties, including fines or prison time.

The federal government classifies substances as controlled substances under the Controlled Substances Act of 1970.

There are five categories in the Controlled Substance Act, which are often related to the potential for substance abuse to occur.

These categories of controlled substance class are:

  • Schedule I: These substances are considered to have no acceptable medical use in the U.S. and high abuse potential. Examples of Schedule I controlled substances are ecstasy, marijuana, heroin, and LSD.
  • Schedule II: This controlled substance class includes stimulants and narcotics considered to have high abuse potential, but they have medical uses in the U.S. too. Schedule II substances include opioids like methadone, codeine, oxycodone, hydrocodone, and stimulants like amphetamine.
  • Schedule III: These substances have less of an abuse potential than substances classified as Schedule I or II, but there is still a risk of psychological and physical dependence. Schedule IV substances include ketamine, anabolic steroids, and medicines with low doses of codeine.
  • Schedule IV: A Schedule IV controlled substance is one with a lower abuse potential than I-III substances. Schedule IV substances include benzodiazepines like Xanax and many prescription sleep aids.
  • Schedule V: A Schedule V drug has a low potential for abuse. Most Schedule V drugs contain a small amount of narcotics, such as cough syrup with codeine.

It is technically illegal to possess any controlled substance, but if you have a prescription and lawfully purchased one, you are exempt from this law.

The government regulates controlled substances because of their addictive and harmful potential effects in manufacturing, distribution, possession, and use.

Controlled-Substances-Act-and-Drug-Scheduling-North-Jersey-Recovery-530610040

Is Alcohol a Controlled Substance?

The brief answer is no; alcohol is not a controlled substance under the Controlled Substances Act. With that being said, alcohol still has a high potential for abuse and addiction. Alcohol is one of the most commonly abused substances around the world.

While alcohol isn’t a controlled substance, it is a regulated one. There are laws regarding the use of alcohol. For example, the legal age to drink alcohol is 21, and you cannot legally drink and drive.

Abuse of Controlled Substances

Since controlled substances are considered to be inherently addictive, they are frequently abused. Opioids are one example of a highly abused controlled substance.

There are both Schedule I and II opioids that are drugs of abuse. Schedule I opioids include heroin, which is entirely illegal. Schedule II opioids include prescription pain relievers. Often, since something is prescribed, there is a misconception that it is somehow safe or not harmful.

Prescription opioids prove otherwise. In addition to being highly addictive, prescription opioids can also lead to fatal overdoses. Some people who abuse prescription opioids they eventually move to other more dangerous types of opioids like heroin or fentanyl.

What starts as legitimate use can spiral into problematic opioid use very quickly.

Mental Illness and Controlled Substances

There are links between mental illnesses and the use of controlled substances. For some people, the use of controlled substances may stem from an attempt to self-medicate and deal with symptoms of anxiety, depression, or other mental health conditions. Controlled substances can also contribute to mental illness.

The links between controlled substances and mental illness are a big reason why addiction treatment relies on therapy. Therapy can be in both a group and individual setting, and it’s a key part of relapse prevention.

Treatment for Abuse of Controlled Substances

If someone is struggling with controlled substance abuse, treatment is available. Treatment can happen in different settings and formats. What is most important is that rehab is personalized to the individual.

The following are some of the types of programs that can treat an addiction to controlled substances.

Medical Detox

When someone regularly uses controlled substances such as opioids, they can become dependent on them. If you’re dependent on a substance and stop using it suddenly, it can cause withdrawal symptoms.

Withdrawal symptoms can range from mild to severe, depending on how long you used the substance, how heavily, and your overall health. Medical detox provides a clinical environment as you go through withdrawal. This can keep you safe and support you.

If necessary, you may receive medications to lessen the symptoms of withdrawal you experience.

Inpatient Rehab

There are varying intensities of inpatient rehab. These programs can last for 28 days, up to several months or more. The commonality between inpatient rehab programs is that you live onsite during your treatment. This helps you leave behind your environment of substance abuse and be in a supportive environment.

You can focus entirely on your recovery in inpatient treatment. Inpatient treatment can also include different types of complementary treatments that help you holistically.

Outpatient Rehab

Outpatient treatment may be a step down from inpatient care, or if you have a mild or short-term addiction to a controlled substance or alcohol, you could do the outpatient treatment.

Outpatient treatment allows you to work on your sobriety and recovery but continue living at home and keeping up with daily responsibilities. Some outpatient treatment programs require a significant time commitment, while others are fairly limited and informal.

Outpatient rehab can also be something you participate in for an extended time as you re-enter your daily life.

Controlled-Substances-Act-and-Drug-Scheduling-North-Jersey-Recovery-95666725

Can You Use Insurance for Rehab?

If you’re considering rehab for a controlled substance, alcohol, or perhaps both, there are payment options available. At North Jersey Recovery Center, we can likely work with your insurance company.

We can verify your coverage for free, which will help you financially plan for your treatment.

Our admissions team can also help you explore other payment options if needed. Above all else, getting the help you need and deserve should be a priority.

Is Alcohol a Controlled Substance? Final Thoughts

The answer to “is alcohol a controlled substance” is no, but that does not make alcohol any less dangerous or addictive.

Controlled substances include prescription and illicit drugs. Alcohol is a regulated but not controlled substance in the U.S.

Controlled substances addiction and alcohol addiction can occur separately from one another or together.

If you would like to learn more about addiction treatment, reach out to North Jersey Recovery Center.

We offer tailored, effective treatment programs in a serene, private setting.

Mental Illness and Addiction: Which Came First? North Jersey Recovery Center - A woman is comforted by an experienced psychiatrist to determine which dual diagnosis she has, and whether the mental health disorder caused the substance abuse or vice versa

Mental Illness and Addiction: Which Came First?

Mental Health and Addiction

Mental illness, sometimes known as a mental disorder, may be defined as a health condition that changes the way you think, feel, behave, or some combination of all three.

This may, in turn, cause you distress and difficulty in functioning.

Bipolar Disorder, Anxiety Disorder, Schizophrenia, and Depression

The most common types of mental illness include bipolar disorder, anxiety disorder, schizophrenia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and dementia.

Mental illness may range from severe to mild, and the symptoms may be different depending on the illness and the affected person.

Some symptoms could include confusion, excessive fear and worries, low energy, mood swing, extreme anger and hostility, suicidal thinking, and antisocial behavior.

Addiction is a Chronic Compulsion

Addiction is a chronic compulsion to take a substance or behave a certain way.

Addiction is the way your body yearns for a substance or behavior, especially if there is a reward attached to it without fear of the consequences.

When you have an addiction, you will be unable to or find it highly challenging to stay away from the substance or behavior.

Addiction can include a chemical or behavioral addiction.

Chemical addiction is the addiction to substances such as alcohol, opioids, and nicotine. It may be referred to as substance-use disorder.

On the other hand, behavioral addiction is an addiction to compulsive behavior.

Examples of behavior addiction include gambling addiction, shopping addiction, sex addiction, television addiction, and food addiction.

Mental-Illness-and-Addiction-Which-Came-First-NJRC-1459128761

Dual Diagnosis

A dual diagnosis was identified for the first time in the 1980s and is commonly referred to as a co-occurring disorder. 

A dual diagnosis occurs when you have both a mental illness and an addiction to a substance.

People who suffer from substance use disorder, which is the addiction to drugs and alcohol, often suffer a co-occurring mental illness.

It is usually thought to be the cause of the addiction. Though they occur together, this does not imply that one is always the cause of the other; it may be challenging to find out which came first.

A dual diagnosis condition may occur as a result of: 

  1. Mental illness which contributes to a substance use disorder. Substance use may be a way for people with mental illness to deal with the illness to feel better, which may lead to an addiction.
  2. Addiction caused by mental illness. Substance abuse may abnormally change how a person’s brain functions, thereby changing the way the person thinks, feels, or behaves.
  3. Mental illness and substance use disorder occur simultaneously due to common risk factors such as stress, trauma, and genetics.

A dual diagnosis can add to the complexity of treatment and recovery and is prone to relapses instances.

The impact of dual diagnosis on people may be an increased violence, suicidal behavior, antisocial behavior, among others.

Mental Health and Substance Abuse

Mental health is the absence of mental illness.

Your mental health affects how you behave, feel, think, how you interact with others and the environment, and how you handle stress.

Mental health plays an essential role in the overall health of a person.

Substance abuse occurs when you use substances such as drugs and alcohol in a way that is inappropriate and may be harmful to your overall health.

Such practices include taking more than the regular dosage of a drug.

In the case of substance abuse, you may abuse drugs and alcohol to ease stress and to feel good, but you can still exert control on yourself.

Continual substance abuse can and usually leads to substance addiction.

On the other hand, substance addiction is more compulsive, it involves a lack of control over your actions and disregard for the repercussions of taking those harmful substances.

You become dependent on the substance.

Those with mental health issues such as depression and anxiety disorder have a high chance of getting addicted to drugs and alcohol. In turn, substance abuse and addiction can lead to mental illness.

Effects of Mental illness

There are several effects of mental illness on a person. They include:

  1. Alienation: the knowledge that you have a mental illness may lead to stigmatization and isolation by others in society.
  2. Suicide: mental illness may cause sadness and anger as well as suicidal thoughts. A person with mental illness may resort to suicide.

Effects of Addiction

Substance abuse and addiction may have short-term and long-term effects on an individual, and these effects vary depending on the substance a person is addicted to.

They include:

  1. The weakening of the immune system, which would lead to increased risks of contracting illness and infections
  2. Paranoia and hallucination
  3. Heart conditions, such as abnormal heart rates and risk of infection. For example, substances such as cocaine can damage the heart and lead to a heart attack
  4. Lung disease: substances that you inhale and smoke may damage your respiratory system and cause lung failure and disease
  5. Seizures, stroke, and brain damage
  6. Short attention span, problems with memory, and poor decision making.
  7. Loss of self-control and aggressiveness
  8. Mental illness, such as depression and anxiety disorder
  9. Death as a result of an overdose

Treatment for Addiction

Addiction is a chronic disease that has affected the lives of many people.

However, it is not a disease that cannot be cured.

The length of time it takes for various people to get better is different, and it is primarily determined by how long an individual has been addicted.

People often need long-term or repeated care to overcome their addictions and return to their healthy lives. 

The addiction treatment often comprises a combination of group and individual therapy sessions that teach the people in recovery the skills needed to stay sober and return to their healthy lives.

Mental-Illness-and-Addiction-Which-Came-First-NJRC-523538425

However, behavioral therapy is one of the most common components used during substance abuse rehabilitation.

Alongside therapy and counseling, medication is also used in many addiction treatment protocols.

These medications may be used to help reduce cravings and ease off withdrawal symptoms.

In the case of co-occurring mental or medical health issues, medications are used to treat these problems.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we offer some of the best treatment types.

Some of these include Inpatient Rehab, Outpatient Rehab, and Evidence-Based treatments, such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), that are utilized for both drug and alcohol rehab. 

Highly trained professionals administer these treatments.

Payment Methods and Free Insurance Verification

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we have multiple payment methods that will help you and your loved ones get the quality help you deserve.

We accept most PPO insurance, private pay options, and we also offer payment plans.

At your request, we can contact your insurance provider to make arrangements that will help us serve you better.

Contact North Jersey Recovery Center Today

Our team at North Jersey Recovery Center comprises highly trained professionals who want to see you and your loved ones happy and healthy.

We understand how delicate rehabilitation can be and we have our doors wide open to give you the help you need.

Drugs and Music North Jersey Recovery Center - A group of partygoers attend a music concert where there is a surplus of drugs and alcohol around

Drugs and Music

What do Drugs and Music Have to do with Each Other?

Musicians throughout history resorted to drugs to augment their creativity.

Listeners also use drugs to enhance the gratification of music. Music and drugs can go hand in hand.

The amount of drug references in music has dramatically increased over the past few decades.

Many songs glorify drug abuse.

There is a powerful representation of drug use in music.

Neuromusicology

The study of “neuromusicology” explores how the human nervous system reacts to music.

For most people, music can help them.

The combination of music and drugs, on the other hand, can rewire the brain.

This makes the cycle of addiction more difficult to break.

Drugs and music together form a powerful association in the brain.

It strengthens the addiction cycle.

The lack of self-control and willpower leads to normalize repetitive addictive behavior.

Music and drug abuse

Numerous musicians have suffered from drug abuse. Many have overdosed on drugs.

Ozzy Osborne’s fame is overshadowed by his drug use.

Amy Winehouse, a Grammy award-winning singer and songwriter, died from alcohol poisoning. She was never able to overcome her addiction. Her song “Rehab” documented her active resistance to treatment.

Drugs-and-Music-NJRC-112955710

Miley Cyrus’s song “Molly” glorifies the drug MDMA. Most genres of popular music glorify drug abuse.

Coupling Music and Drugs

Music has shown strong mood-enhancing qualities.

Amphetamine is a stimulant that is associated with repetitive music. This drug facilitates the desire of people to dance.

MDMA or ecstasy goes with electric music with repetitive beats and movements.

Rap music often references marijuana, violence, and drug dealing in its lyrics.

Many songs that allude to drug abuse are known to cause intense cravings in former addicts.

Music represents a prevalent source of exposure to substance use.

You can fall, victim, if you fail to recognize that your music preferences can cause you to be susceptible to drug abuse.

Music Festivals and Drug Abuse

Drugs are a common feature at a music festival.

This practice began long before Woodstock glorified drug use as a means of “free expression.”  

Drug use is illegal, but music festivals are popular spots for illicit drug use.

One in four who attend these music festivals are under the influence of one or more substances. Attendees mostly use drugs to enhance their experience.

The atmosphere and availability of drugs create irresistible temptations.

Music festivals like Burning Man and Electric Daisy Carnival have become popular in recent years.

People who attend these events often plan to use or experiment with one or more types of drugs.

Alcohol is another substance responsible for a high number of overdoses during music festivals.

Dangerous side effects like dehydration can occur when using multiple substances.

Numerous deaths have been reported from overexposure, overdose, and exhaustion.

Using drugs is a dangerous practice that can lead you down the road of addiction.

Effects of Drugs and Music

You may think that using drugs or alcohol will enhance your enjoyment. 

However, the link between certain music genres and drug abuse is undoubtedly a key aspect of drug abuse.

Substance abuse can lead to some devastating consequences.

You can lose everything when you are unable to stop.

When treating drug abuse, sharing your involvement of drugs and music is a crucial part of treatment.

This information is useful in targeting and coming up with a plan designed to address your drug associations.

Programs can focus on harm reduction initiatives.

Learning to control your impulses that drive your drug use will allow you to develop self-control.

Minimizing these triggers to use will help you reach sobriety.

Mental Health, Music, and Drugs

Music has been known to soothe the soul.

You may listen to music to express yourself when you do not have the words to.

Many forms of music are used as an effective treatment for trauma.

However, when you pair music and drugs together, it can lead to a struggle to overcome addiction.

Your brain becomes accustomed to the routine of music and drugs.

Music may serve to normalize or justify your drug abuse.

Learning about the dangers of drugs can allow you to make better decisions.

Drug Abuse Treatment

If you are struggling with substance abuse, the time to seek treatment is now.

What may start off as innocent experimentation can become something far more dangerous.

Drug use can spiral out of control. You can find yourself completely dependent.

Without treatment for your addiction, you will suffer from uncomfortable symptoms of withdrawal.

You may even find yourself making reckless decisions and engaging in risky behaviors.

Understanding the root of your addiction is a step towards recovery.

If music is a trigger, you can learn to manage and develop skills to resist the urge to use.

Addiction does not go away on its own. It is a choice you must make every day.

Affordable Treatment Programs

Although music does not cause you to use drugs, it can certainly influence you.

Getting proper help is the key to overcoming your addiction.

North Jersey Recovery Center offers insurance verification to ensure that your treatment is covered.

Our staff will reach out on your behalf.

We will take the time to discuss the options with your insurance company.

We believe that everyone deserves the chance to find a program that works.

Drugs-and-Music-NJRC-574300303

Drug Rehab at North Jersey Recovery Center

Recovery from substance addiction involves making significant changes in your behavior.

Understanding the factors that influence your dependence is an important part of treatment.

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, it is important to seek help.

Everyone enters the addiction cycle differently.

Yet, the vicious cycle of drug abuse remains the same for everyone.

If you are struggling with stopping on your own, reach out to our call center for support.

We are here to help you through the entire process, from intervention to recovery.

You do not have to do this alone.

North Jersey Recovery Center wants to support your journey.

Sobriety Codependency North Jersey Recovery Center - A woman struggling with addiction is co-dependent on her husband during the path to recovery, which can be considered Sobriety Codependency

Sobriety Codependency

Co-Dependency and a Person’s Healthy Relationships

Co-dependency is a term popularly used when discussing sobriety.

Mental Health America defines co-dependency as a condition that affects a person’s ability to have healthy relationships, a condition often referred to as relationship addiction.

The relationships formed as a result of co-dependency can be one-sided and often toxic.

Those is recovery have a tend to build co-dependent relationships.

Meeting other people recovering from addiction can be tricky.

Putting the Needs of Other People First

Co-dependent relationships see one person continually putting the needs of the other person above their own.

Most co-dependent relationships involving recovering addicts usually involve a sober party who may act as a caretaker.

Co-dependent relationships are, by nature, very demanding.

There are several different sides to co-dependent relationships.

Unfortunately, most of the effects of co-dependency are harmful and counterproductive to addiction recovery.

How Does Co-Dependency Work

There is usually a structure to the nature of a co-dependent relationship.

The motivation behind co-dependency is often a deep-seated fear of being alone.

This fear of being alone makes people in co-dependent relationships go to great lengths to preserve these relationships.

Co-dependent relationships have two major roles.

Every co-dependent relationship has an enabler and a manipulator.

Several different factors may be responsible for why a person is co-dependent.

Co-dependents are usually the products of mental illness, dysfunctional homes, or childhood abuse.

Sobriety-Codependency-NJRC-1150541078

Enabler

An enabler, as the name implies, enables the other party by encouraging or allowing certain behavior.  

Enablers are usually passive people; in most cases, they allow things to happen to them.

Overtime in the relationship, enablers slowly lose their sense of identity to the other party.

Certain personality traits are usually associated with enablers. Traits like low self-esteem and a compulsive desire to please are characteristic of enablers.

Manipulator

In most co-dependent cases, the person struggling with addiction is the manipulator.

A manipulator takes advantage of the weaknesses of the enabler to have their way.

A manipulator may be aggressive or passive, depending on their personality types.

By preying on the weaknesses of the enabler, the manipulator can have their way.

Manipulators are takers in a co-dependent relationship.

Co-dependency is a significant threat to sobriety.

For someone in recovery, either of these two positions in a co-dependent relationship is bad.

As an enabler or a manipulator, a co-dependent relationship may catalyze relapse.

Negative Effects of Co-Dependency on Sobriety

One of the most obvious and major effects of co-dependency is its strain on those in the recovery process.

In situations where both parties used to abuse substances together, a co-dependent relationship is unhealthy.

When a recovering addict is focused on sobriety and has a manipulator partner, there is a risk of relapse.

It is not uncommon for one party to make the drug use a condition for a relationship.

Unfortunately, this may make the party trying to stay sober relapse.

Being co-dependent on a person does not help sobriety.

In some cases, a partner might intentionally cause a relapse.

Some partners prefer the dynamic of their relationships with substance abuse.

Getting used to a particular way of life with a partner might lead a manipulator to undermine recovery.

In other cases, the issue may not even be drug use.

There is a tendency for individuals in recovery to substitute one addiction with another, which is very unhealthy.

Although a person in recovery may not manipulate their partner for drugs, they may do so for other things.

There is also a tendency for partners to enable their sober partners as they pick up new addictions.

A co-dependency relationship may make it difficult for relapses to be addressed swiftly.

Enablers in these relationships might cover such incidents up for the recovering addict.

Treatment for Co-Dependency

Co-dependency can be treated, much like any other illness.

Treating co-dependency is essential. An example of a sobriety co-dependency is AA co-dependency.

It is important to ensure that your sobriety rests in your hands alone.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, our professionals are available to help you manage any co-dependency issues that you may have, such as AA codependency.

Treatment must begin with one party admitting that there is a problem.

There must be a genuine desire to solve the issue of co-dependency, like that of AA codependency.

Once a genuine willingness for treatment has been expressed, the process of treatment can begin.

Treatment for co-dependency may involve a number of different issues.

Where alcohol and substance abuse is ongoing, special treatment may need to be administered first.

It is generally agreed upon that psychotherapy is the most effective treatment for co-dependency.

Treatment is administered in stages; the first involves the individual, and then it involves the couples, and finally, it involves group therapy.

Sobriety-Codependency-NJRC-566877985-1

Individual Therapy

Individual therapy involves one-on-one sessions with our licensed therapists at North Jersey Recovery Center.

This therapy is focused on observing why a partner may be co-dependent, such as for AA codependency.

It usually involves an in-depth analysis of emotions to discover the underlying reasons for behavior.

Group Therapy

In group therapy, those in recovery can discuss with other people who have gone through the same experiences.

In this therapy, you can discuss all types of sobriety co-dependency aspects, such as AA co-dependency.

Couples Counseling

In this stage, co-dependent partners can receive counseling on how to establish a more balanced relationship.

By analyzing situations, our therapists can help you recognize situations that are unhealthy for your relationship.

Each of these steps of therapy is essential for full and complete recovery.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we pride ourselves on offering the best quality of services to all of our clients.

If you or your partner require addiction treatment, our facilities are the best place to receive this.

We offer inpatient and outpatient treatment alongside Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

Your desire to be better is combined with our expertise to produce the best results possible.

We believe that you deserve to live the best quality of life possible.

We offer you access to a full team of therapists, medical professionals, and trained counselors.

Addiction Treatment at North Jersey Recovery Center

We ensure that all of our patients get the best treatment, especially for AA codependency.

This is why we offer free insurance verification.

We will contact your insurance company on your behalf to specify the nature of the treatment that you require.

We also accept PPO insurance in addition to private forms of payment for treatments received.

Our trained personnel are available to ensure that you receive full insurance benefits for your treatment.

Your full recovery is our major priority.

How Does Family Help One Struggling with Addiction North Jersey Recovery Center - Parents of a loved one struggling with addiction are getting advice and guidance on how to help family with addiction

How Does Family Help One Struggling with Addiction?

Addiction Does Not Affect Only the Person with Addiction

Addiction does not affect only the person struggling with substance abuse; the disease often spills over to the person’s loved ones.

It might seem like as a loved one; you are not affected by the decisions and lifestyle of your friend or family member who is addicted.

It is essential to know that the word “addict” in this article is not only referring to individuals addicted to “street drugs,” but also people addicted to alcohol.

If you begin to truly open up about the choices and decisions you have made, you suddenly might start to understand that your life is just as affected as that of the person struggling with addiction.

North Jersey Recovery Center has set up structures that aid open conversations that help both the person struggling with substance abuse and those around them.

It is crucial to have a support system in your journey to recovery, and our specialists understand that.

Family and Addiction

Over time, the structure of families has developed.

It has grown to be more than the traditional nuclear family.

We now have single-parent families, foster families, blended families, and many others. 

The way each family is affected differ based on their structure.

An example of such differences is evident when a child develops a denial system that protects them from the reality of their parent’s addiction.

On the other hand, a single parent household does not have that option.

The children are more likely to behave in a way that does not match their age to compensate for their parent’s deficiency.

How-Does-Family-Help-One-Struggling-With-Addiction-NJRC-1056944960

The Extended Family is Not Left Out

Although the nuclear family feels the effects of substance abuse by a loved one directly, the extended family isn’t left out.

Members of the extended family might feel anger, embarrassment, anxiety, and sometimes even grief.

These reactions can often have a negative impact on both the person abusing substances and other generations. For example, a parent whose parent abused substances has the tendency of being overbearing and overprotective of his or her children.

There are patterns of interactions with different family structures that are often noticed when someone is addicted to drugs or alcohol.

Some of these include;

  • Negative Attitude: The communication between the members of the family is characterized by negativity. The entire atmosphere is downright gloomy, and constructive actions are not popular amongst members of the family. Most times, communication takes the form of complaints, verbal disapproval, and other types of displeasure. 
  • Parental Inconsistency: Disregard for responsibilities is one of the effects of addiction. Children often get confused because a clear boundary has not been drawn by the people or person in charge (parents). Without this set of rules and regulations both parent’s and children’s cannot be predicted. These inconsistencies are often present irrespective of the person abusing substances.
  • Unrealistic Expectations from Parents: It is no news that the influence of parents primarily affects their children. A parent’s expectations can be unrealistic. This often causes both parties to spiral out of control when their expectations cannot be met. When the expectations are too high, the child might give up and become lackadaisical. On the other hand, they may work obsessively.

Self-medication, miscarriage of emotions, and parental denial are also some of these patterns of interaction.

The best way to deal with all these cases is a complete restructuring of the family.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we have well-trained professionals that are skilled in family therapy and other programs that help reunite the family.

Family Help and Addiction

Family members play a significant role in their loved one’s recovery. 

Studies show that family support in the process of intervention contributed largely to the recovery success amongst addicts. The important thing is to be there for your loved one struggling with recovery during their trying times.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we have various treatments for those having a hard time quitting drugs and alcohol.

Some of these include Detox, Inpatient, Outpatient, Interventions, and other forms of treatment that will help your journey.

It is important to understand the feelings of family members, as members of your family form the essential support a person who is addicted to any substance needs.

The avenue by which these feelings are passed across is also as important.

During interventions, family members or loved ones often get hurt or confused.

These feelings are counterproductive to the recovery process of a person struggling with addiction or substance abuse.

This is why it is important to know how to help families with addiction.

However, there are strategies used to turn these ill feelings into positive motivation.

Some of these strategies include family therapy, counseling, family support groups, and open discussions.

The goal is to equip family members with the information and skill they will need in the journey ahead.

Once the family dynamic is stable, a stable support system is more guaranteed, and the chances of a successful recovery are higher.

How-Does-Family-Help-One-Struggling-With-Addiction-NJRC-696579685

Addiction and Mental Health

An individual with both a mental health issue and an addiction problem is often more challenging to treat.

The term used to describe this is called a co-occurring disorder or a dual diagnosis.

Both the mental health issues and the drug or alcohol have their own peculiar symptoms. Most of these symptoms prevent you from carrying out your regular activities.

The situation gets more complicated because the co-occurring disorders also affect each other.

When there is no help for a person struggling with addiction, their mental health problems usually become more severe.

On the other hand, when a mental health issue goes untreated, substance abuse often gets worse.

The team of professionals at North Jersey Recovery Center is well equipped to handle your co-occurring disorder.

We ensure that every patient is paired with the most professional and highly trained addiction specialists in the country in a unique plan established for your recovery.

You can be sure that you or your loved ones are in good hands.

Payment Methods and Free Insurance Verification

The services we offer at North Jersey Recovery Center are top-notch.

We aspire to give each client a blissful experience, including payment methods that are suitable for you and your loved ones.

We accept most PPO insurance, private pay options, and we also offer payment plans.

Wee aim to provide quality services at affordable prices.

To make your experience more stress-free, we take on the burden of communicating with your insurance provider on your behalf.

We aim to ensure that you or your loved one get the help they need.

Treatment at North Jersey Recovery Center

Whenever family therapy is adopted in the treatment of an individual struggling with addiction, social problems associated with substance abuse should be considered.

Often, issues such as joblessness, domestic violence, child abuse, or neglect are noticed among families dealing with substance abuse.

Our team works together with professionals in other fields to effectively treat these issues to ensure effective concurrent treatment.

Furthermore, multifamily group therapy, individual therapy, and psychological consultation can be added to family therapy.

These various approaches aid concurrent treatment.

Also, empowering the family is a crucial benefit that should not be sacrificed.

What Causes Addiction North Jersey Recovery Center - A young man sits with a professional and experienced psychiatrist to determine what the cause of his addictions are and the best treatment plan for him based on his addiction needs and requirements

What Causes Addiction?

Like many people, you may wonder what causes addiction to drugs and alcohol.

The answer to this question is important for everyone to know.

However, they’re especially important to people facing serious drug or alcohol problems.

Why? By learning the causes of addiction, you can improve your understanding of what is happening to you or your loved one facing addiction issues.

This, in turn, may enable you to help yourself or your loved one find effective addiction treatment.

What Causes People to Use Drugs or Alcohol

There is no single reason why people start using drugs or alcohol.

Research shows that the most common motivations for substance use include:
 

  •         A desire to increase feelings of pleasure
  •         A desire to escape mental or physical pain
  •         Peer pressure or a desire to belong
  •         Curiosity about the effects of drugs or alcohol
  •         A desire to get better grades at school
  •         A desire to boost work performance[I]


It is important to note that most people start using drugs or alcohol on their own.

However, some people are forced into substance use.

In the beginning, almost no one expects that drinking or drug use will lead to addiction.

Instead, they end up losing control over their substance intake.

When this happens, substance use becomes involuntary.

Why People Become Addicted

 
One of the most important facts about addictive substances is that not everyone who uses them will develop an addiction.

No one can say for sure who will go on to develop serious drug or alcohol problems.

However, experts know that there are many possible underlying reasons for addiction.

These reasons include such things as:
 

  •         A genetic tendency toward addiction
  •         Getting involved in substance use before you’re an adult
  •         Having a significant mental illness
  •         Having an unstable or unhappy home life
  •         Having parents who don’t provide adequate supervision
  •         Having trouble fitting in socially
  •         Having friends or acquaintances who drink or use drugs
  •         Living in an environment where substance use is common
  •         Having problems at school
  •         Having problems in the workplace
  •         Living in a place where poverty is common

 
Not everyone affected by these risks will develop an addiction.

Still, their presence increases the odds of developing a problem.

In any one person, the potential causes of addiction can overlap.

For this reason, specialists view addiction as a complex condition, not a simple one.


What Causes Addiction in the Brain

 
Addiction affects both the brain and the body.

However, the actual causes of addiction are found in the brain. When thinking about addiction and the brain, it helps to understand a few things.

First, when you drink or take a drug or medication, that substance enters your bloodstream. Once it does, it travels to your brain.

After gaining access to your brain, drugs and alcohol have multiple effects. The most important effects occur in a brain area called the pleasure center when it comes to addiction.

The pleasure center gets its name because it’s where your brain creates pleasurable sensations.

These sensations occur whenever you do something that increases the production of a brain chemical called dopamine. Lots of everyday activities produce dopamine and cause you to feel pleasure.

Common examples include:

However, as a rule, none of these activities boost your dopamine levels as much as drugs or alcohol.

In fact, certain drugs can raise your dopamine output up to ten times beyond normal levels. 

This explains why people feel such a surge of pleasure when they first use these substances.

It also helps explain why some people develop a pattern of frequent substance use.

Physical Dependence (Addiction and the Body)

 
Unfortunately, if you repeatedly use an addictive substance, your brain starts to change.

Eventually, it will start treating the high levels of dopamine as a normal situation. When this happens, you develop something called physical dependence.

Physical dependence means that you now need a certain quantity of drugs or alcohol to satisfy your brain.

If you don’t get that amount, you can go into substance withdrawal. Withdrawal is your brain’s way of telling you that it expects you to take more of a given substance.

Psychological Dependence (Addiction and the Mind)

 
People addicted to drugs or alcohol are not just affected by physical dependence. They also suffer from something called psychological dependence. This form of dependence means that you experience emotional changes that support uncontrolled substance use.
 
One of the most important symptoms of psychological dependence is a strong urge to consume drugs or alcohol.

In addition, it produces a strong compulsion to seek out more substances to consume.

Physical and psychological dependence have a combined effect. This fact helps explain why it can be so hard to recover from addiction.

What-Causes-Addiction-NJRC-1123885724


What Chemicals Make Substances Addictive?

 
You may wonder what chemical makes drugs addictive.

You may also wonder what chemical makes alcohol addictive.

However, this is not quite the way to think about addiction.

The most important thing is not the specific chemicals in drugs or alcohol. (In fact, not all addictive substances contain similar active ingredients.)

Instead, what matters is how drugs and alcohol affect your system.

As long as a substance triggers major increases in your dopamine levels, its use can lead to addiction.

This is true, no matter how that substance produces a dopamine increase.

Learn More About What Causes Addiction

 
What is addiction? Doctors define this condition as a chronic disease triggered by excessive use of drugs, medications, or alcohol.

What-Causes-Addiction-NJRC-1555828889

Not everyone who uses too much of these substances will become addicted.

Still, a significant percentage of people will.

There is more than one reason for getting involved in substance use.

Similarly, there’s more than one underlying cause of addiction, and multiple causes often appear together in the same person.

The process of addiction begins when drugs or alcohol boost your brain’s levels of dopamine. Higher dopamine levels lead to increased pleasure.

The amount of dopamine produced by addictive substances is far greater than the amount produced by everyday pleasures, which explains why people repeatedly use these substances.

It also helps explain why some users get caught in a cycle of substance abuse and addiction.

There is no one chemical in drugs that leads to addiction.

The same fact holds true for alcohol. Instead, regardless of the specific chemicals they contain, all addictive substances trigger major dopamine increases.

Addicted people suffer from two problems: physical addiction to substances and mental addiction to substances.

Physical addiction leads to rising substance tolerance, while mental addiction leads to compulsive urges to use drugs or alcohol.

The two forms of addiction work together, not separately, and this is what makes treating addiction so difficult.

Still, it’s possible to treat even the worst effects of drug or alcohol addiction.

For more information on how to help someone with an addiction, just contact our experts at North Jersey Recovery Center today.

5 Tips for Writing a Great Intervention Letter North Jersey Recovery Center - A group of family and friends gather for an intervention for a loved one that is experiencing severe drug and alcohol addiction problems and should seek treatment as soon as possible

5 Tips for Writing a Great Intervention Letter

Need a way to advise a loved one struggling with addiction?

It takes courage and dedication to face someone whose addictive behaviors have caused you pain or concern.

An intervention letter may be a great way to get your message across.

This article highlights five tips that will help you write an intervention letter to your loved one to help them with whatever harmful behaviors or activities they may be addicted to.

The seconds leading up to an intervention are full of doubt.

It’s impossible to know how your loved one would respond.

When feelings run high, it becomes impossible to come up with the best things to speak.

Most therapy experts consider writing a letter to read aloud at the therapy session or intervention to keep it on track and ensure everyone’s message is understood.

Intervention letters are a valuable tool to make addict sufferers understand how their behaviors affect the people they care most for.

An intervention letter will also serve as a guide to keep you from feeling upset while you’re trying to chat.

There is no correct way to write  an intervention letter, but before you start writing, it’s good to have some direction in mind.

Try to put yourself in your loved one’s shoes when brainstorming.

While you may have been upset by their actions, it is important to note they are still suffering.

Sharing your emotions, both positive and negative, is perfectly acceptable as long as they are presented in a non-confrontational manner.

Seek to share the letter with those who join in the action.

A second pair of eyes may detect words or phrases that could be read as angry or accusatory.

5-Tips-for-Writing-a-Great-Intervention-Letter-NJRC-1530336794

Things to Consider When Writing an Intervention Letter

1. Begin with a statement of compassion.

Consider the relationship you had with your loved one and the moments they had been there for you before their addiction.

“Dad, I know that you really love me, and you are really proud of me. If it weren’t for you, I‘d not be where I am or get what I do. You taught me that before I rely on anyone else to do this for me, I need to learn how to take care of myself. You helped me in my professional ambitions and supported me. This gave me the confidence that I wanted to take on my own work roles in the Midwest.”

2. Outline a specific example of their substance abuse and how it affected you.

It’s important to know how your loved one feels about their acts.

“Dad, your drinking has been a chronic part of our lives. We have not come over here immediately. Your time is running out. When it is so late in the evening, when I call home to check-in, you’re intoxicated. You get on the phone, and there’s a slurred voice. You don’t even mention our discussions when we speak later in the week. You‘re sometimes dead, so we can’t talk at all.”

Use clear, tangible descriptions of the drug abuse your loved one serves to open your mind to the truth of your addiction. Ignore words that might make your loved one feel threatened.

3. Show that you’ve taken the time to understand their addiction.

Let them know that their abuse is a disorder you recognize and acknowledge is not their fault, but that it is time to let them know how important care is.

“…It took me some time to think about chemical dependence and I discovered that this is a disease that requires medical treatment. This is not about your stamina. It’s a case of seeking medical treatment with a particular disorder.”

When you educate yourself about the issue of drug dependence in your loved one, you can be more comfortable about convincing them that recovery is the most successful form of healing.

4. Repeat your love and concern and ask them to accept help.

Bring it all together when explaining the care and healing services to your loved one.

“I respect you and I don’t want to see alcoholism draining away life from you. We‘re all here together, and we want support from you. We are here to assist. Would you want to consider our support today? Love, Tina, Your Friend”

Once you have completed reading your message, continue educating your loved one about the current care services, as well as the potential repercussions if they fail to seek assistance.

5. Clearly define the consequences if treatment is refused

It is imperative to layout your own personal set of consequences and boundaries if your loved one refuses to accept treatment. An example could be, “If you do not get help for your addiction, I will not continue to give you money for your rent.”

Writing an intervention letter isn’t always easy, but if you strive to achieve these five things in your letter, your loved one may be more inclined to listen, and the addiction intervention may be more successful.

Some other tips include:

  • Begin the letter with a heartfelt statement full of the love and concern that one truly feels. 
  • Communicate gratitude to the person. For instance, if the loved one is a parent, share a memory about when they did something loving, like going to a school play. 
  • Think about including a statement that reflects your understanding that substance abuse is a disease. By putting the issue into a medical context, the loved one may feel less guilty. This individual likely feels powerless in the face of the addiction, which is not a moral failing, though the person may feel this way at times. 
  • Addiction can make a great person do not such great things. But you can convey that you know the difference between who the person is and how addiction may compel them to behave. Express that you are mindful of the difference between who the individual is and how addiction could force them to behave.
  • Include points of fact about the actions of the loved one while on drugs. Providing multiple examples is a smart idea.
  • Remind the individual of your feelings and worries. And mention that the community gives them care at the recovery facility.
  • Tell the loved one to consent to the care request.

A Life-Saving Message

The letter you read aloud to your loved one during the intervention could be the most important thing you ever write.

Many people who have successfully emerged from addiction would say their tipping point was the day their families and friends heard what they wanted to say.

When a loved one understands all the ones they care for have been affected by their abuse, the next step is to find the best medication that fits their needs.

Everybody needs a second chance, and healing is the only way to restore your health and joy at North Jersey Recovery Center.

5-Tips-for-Writing-a-Great-Intervention-Letter-NJRC-676406629

Insurance Verification

We believe that each of our clients deserves the best treatment possible.

To ensure that our clients get the best treatments, we craft a custom plan for each client.

We accept PPO payments as well as other private forms of payments for treatment.

Our personnel will communicate with all of the relevant insurance providers on your behalf to ensure that you or your loved one get the treatment you need.

Contact Us

Feel free to contact us for any questions or inquiries that you may have about our services.

We believe that everyone deserves an opportunity to heal fully, and this is what we offer at North Jersey Recovery Center.

Relapse Prevention Triggers and Warning Signs North Jersey Recovery Center - A man relapses with his alcohol addiction because he was unaware of how to handle his prevention triggers and warning signs

Relapse Prevention Triggers and Warning Signs

Relapse – One of the Biggest Fears a Someone Recovering from Addiction

One of the biggest fears of every person that is recovering from addiction is relapsing. Recovery from addiction usually comes with a lot of different challenges.

Sobriety is often described as a journey because of the length of time it takes to get to a safe and healthy place. Addiction is a war that lasts a lifetime. Battling addiction while dealing with the day-to-day challenges that come with life is extremely tasking.

Those in recovery agree that there are so many different triggers that may cause a relapse.

Avoiding these triggers and thriving is very difficult but still possible.

To relapse simple means to slip back into a former state.

In this case, a relapse means moving back into drug use and abuse.

One important thing to note is that a decline can happen at any time.

In some cases, a relapse may be a one-time thing only.

In other cases, a relapse may lead to several other declines and, eventually, back to addiction. What determines whether relapse is a one-time thing or if it is not is how it is managed.

Individuals in recovery need to be able to recognize their possible relapse triggers and have a relapse plan to handle them.

Triggers

In most cases, triggers vary from person to person.

However, some universal triggers have been identified.

These situations make recovering addicts susceptible to relapse.

Better understanding these triggers can help with relapse preventions.

Unrealistic Expectations

A lot of individuals recovering from addiction expect their lives to completely change after overcoming addiction.

It is natural to feel that after such a significant life adjustment, major changes should begin to happen. The disappointment that comes when these expectations are not fulfilled can be a relapse trigger.

Those in recovery should learn to pace themselves. Understanding that recovery is a process that may take some time goes a long way in preventing a relapse. Part of recovery is getting your life back, and this can take some time.

Old/Familiar Friendships

Falling back into old habits with old acquaintances can also be a trigger for relapses.

Friends may remind you of the euphoria of drug use, while leaving out the bad parts.

Those in recovery need to avoid or limit their interactions with old friends. Being around old friends allows you to consider drugs as an option when you are in bad situations.

To ultimately ensure that drugs are not a solution for anything, you must keep old friends, who encourage bad habits, away.

Anger

Even sober people can find themselves doing unnatural things when angry.

For recovering individuals, anger should be monitored closely as a trigger.

Most of these individuals may feel an urge to resort to drug use to deal with anger.

Those who have struggled with addiction must learn how to process anger without drugs.

It is also vital to avoid getting angry as much as they can. Anger management can be treated with Cognitive Behavior Therapy.

Loneliness

A lot of recovering individuals deal with loneliness. This emotion is dangerous because they may use pills or other substances to numb the loneliness.

Whenever you may feel lonely, take some time to join a support group to distract yourself.

As much as possible, recovering persons should avoid being lonely because it is a trigger.

It is important to be surrounded by friends and a network of supporters who can engage you well enough to prevent a relapse.

Hunger

Although it is hardly talked about, being hungry can cloud judgment.

It is important that those in recovery eat healthy and frequently.

Having a good meal makes you less likely to slip-up and relapse.

Regular meals and healthy snacks are important to prevent any potential relapses.

Fatigue

Recovering persons need to pace themselves.

The initial excitement of being drug-free may lead many recovering individuals to take on more than they can handle. It is important to ensure that you expend energy consciously.

Fatigue makes anyone vulnerable, and it is crucial to avoid situations that may cause a recovering person vulnerable.

If you are spread too thin, you may begin to look for other sources of energy, which may lead you back to square one.

Relapse Prevention Warning Signs

Identifying triggers is one of the first steps to preventing relapse.

However, it is just as important to recognize what signs may indicate that a relapse is possible. 

Understanding the warning signs of relapse allows you to take precautionary steps to prevent relapse.

The decline is more of a process than an isolated event. Relapses are usually a three-step process: emotional, mental and physical.

The warning signs of a relapse can also be classified into these three categories:

Emotional Warning Signs

Emotional warning signs are usually part of the process where the person begins to feel negative emotions.

At this point, most people have no intention of relapsing.

Certain emotions must be monitored closely to ensure that they do not lead to a relapse.

Anxiety

Anxiety is a major emotional sign of a relapse.

When a person begins to worry intensely about the future, they are more vulnerable to relapse.

Worrying about things that cannot be controlled usually pushes recovering persons to find escapes. Recurring feelings of anxiety are a warning sign.

Mood Swings

Mood swings are usually indicative of a potential relapse.

In most instances, the highs and lows of mood swings usually leave the recovering individuals vulnerable.

Where you notice a repeated pattern of mood swings, it is essential to seek help.

Anger

Anger can also be indicative of a potential relapse.

Frequent outbursts of anger usually leave people disoriented and vulnerable.

If such episodes become more and more prevalent, it may be a sign of a likely relapse.

Relapse-Prevention-Triggers-and-Warning-Signs-NJRC-157245107

Mental Warning Signs

At this point, the emotional warning signs outlined above may have driven a person to consider using substances again.

Most of the mental warning signs are an internal struggle between relapsing and staying strong.

The person may consider relapsing as a coping mechanism for emotional stress. Some mental stress warning include;

Having Fantasies about Relapsing

Fantasizing about relapsing is a huge mental warning sign and should be taken seriously for relapse prevention.

In most cases, constant consideration of the possibility of relapsing ends with people relapsing.

Lying

If you frequently find yourself lying about things, you may have a problem.

It is essential to be accountable to friends and family.

Dishonesty may create a platform for relapsing. By being honest, it helps with relapse prevention.

Glamorizing your Past

Always reminiscing and glamorizing former drug use can lead to a relapse.

It is important to let go of those memories and focus on making new ones.

Hanging Around Old Spots

If you constantly hang around spots where you used to do drugs, you may have a problem.

There is a higher possibility of a person relapsing in familiar environments.

Staying far away from such places is the best option for relapse prevention.

Treatment

If you have experienced any of these warning signs, you may need professional help to maintain your sobriety.

Although some relapses are one-time events, most relapses lead right back to a full-on addiction.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, our professionals are available to help you manage your triggers and warning signs.

When well managed, these warning signs are only signs.

Our professionals are experienced in dealing with relapses.

The level of experience our professionals at North Jersey Recovery Center provide the skills needed to prevent potential relapses.

To ensure that all of our clients experience the best services, we offer free insurance verification services.

The best therapy and treatment services for relapse prevention will be administered to you.

Relapse-Prevention-Triggers-and-Warning-Signs-NJRC-289044410

Our personnel will contact your insurance providers directly to ensure that you get the necessary coverage for relapse prevention.

Sobriety is a journey.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we ensure that you continue to move forward on your journey.

You deserve a happy and healthy life, and this is what we aim to give to you.