Relapse Prevention Triggers and Warning Signs North Jersey Recovery Center - A man relapses with his alcohol addiction because he was unaware of how to handle his prevention triggers and warning signs

Relapse Prevention Triggers and Warning Signs

Relapse – One of the Biggest Fears a Someone Recovering from Addiction

One of the biggest fears of every person that is recovering from addiction is relapsing. Recovery from addiction usually comes with a lot of different challenges.

Sobriety is often described as a journey because of the length of time it takes to get to a safe and healthy place. Addiction is a war that lasts a lifetime. Battling addiction while dealing with the day-to-day challenges that come with life is extremely tasking.

Those in recovery agree that there are so many different triggers that may cause a relapse.

Avoiding these triggers and thriving is very difficult but still possible.

To relapse simple means to slip back into a former state.

In this case, a relapse means moving back into drug use and abuse.

One important thing to note is that a decline can happen at any time.

In some cases, a relapse may be a one-time thing only.

In other cases, a relapse may lead to several other declines and, eventually, back to addiction. What determines whether relapse is a one-time thing or if it is not is how it is managed.

Individuals in recovery need to be able to recognize their possible relapse triggers and have a relapse plan to handle them.

Triggers

In most cases, triggers vary from person to person.

However, some universal triggers have been identified.

These situations make recovering addicts susceptible to relapse.

Better understanding these triggers can help with relapse preventions.

Unrealistic Expectations

A lot of individuals recovering from addiction expect their lives to completely change after overcoming addiction.

It is natural to feel that after such a significant life adjustment, major changes should begin to happen. The disappointment that comes when these expectations are not fulfilled can be a relapse trigger.

Those in recovery should learn to pace themselves. Understanding that recovery is a process that may take some time goes a long way in preventing a relapse. Part of recovery is getting your life back, and this can take some time.

Old/Familiar Friendships

Falling back into old habits with old acquaintances can also be a trigger for relapses.

Friends may remind you of the euphoria of drug use, while leaving out the bad parts.

Those in recovery need to avoid or limit their interactions with old friends. Being around old friends allows you to consider drugs as an option when you are in bad situations.

To ultimately ensure that drugs are not a solution for anything, you must keep old friends, who encourage bad habits, away.

Anger

Even sober people can find themselves doing unnatural things when angry.

For recovering individuals, anger should be monitored closely as a trigger.

Most of these individuals may feel an urge to resort to drug use to deal with anger.

Those who have struggled with addiction must learn how to process anger without drugs.

It is also vital to avoid getting angry as much as they can. Anger management can be treated with Cognitive Behavior Therapy.

Loneliness

A lot of recovering individuals deal with loneliness. This emotion is dangerous because they may use pills or other substances to numb the loneliness.

Whenever you may feel lonely, take some time to join a support group to distract yourself.

As much as possible, recovering persons should avoid being lonely because it is a trigger.

It is important to be surrounded by friends and a network of supporters who can engage you well enough to prevent a relapse.

Hunger

Although it is hardly talked about, being hungry can cloud judgment.

It is important that those in recovery eat healthy and frequently.

Having a good meal makes you less likely to slip-up and relapse.

Regular meals and healthy snacks are important to prevent any potential relapses.

Fatigue

Recovering persons need to pace themselves.

The initial excitement of being drug-free may lead many recovering individuals to take on more than they can handle. It is important to ensure that you expend energy consciously.

Fatigue makes anyone vulnerable, and it is crucial to avoid situations that may cause a recovering person vulnerable.

If you are spread too thin, you may begin to look for other sources of energy, which may lead you back to square one.

Relapse Prevention Warning Signs

Identifying triggers is one of the first steps to preventing relapse.

However, it is just as important to recognize what signs may indicate that a relapse is possible. 

Understanding the warning signs of relapse allows you to take precautionary steps to prevent relapse.

The decline is more of a process than an isolated event. Relapses are usually a three-step process: emotional, mental and physical.

The warning signs of a relapse can also be classified into these three categories:

Emotional Warning Signs

Emotional warning signs are usually part of the process where the person begins to feel negative emotions.

At this point, most people have no intention of relapsing.

Certain emotions must be monitored closely to ensure that they do not lead to a relapse.

Anxiety

Anxiety is a major emotional sign of a relapse.

When a person begins to worry intensely about the future, they are more vulnerable to relapse.

Worrying about things that cannot be controlled usually pushes recovering persons to find escapes. Recurring feelings of anxiety are a warning sign.

Mood Swings

Mood swings are usually indicative of a potential relapse.

In most instances, the highs and lows of mood swings usually leave the recovering individuals vulnerable.

Where you notice a repeated pattern of mood swings, it is essential to seek help.

Anger

Anger can also be indicative of a potential relapse.

Frequent outbursts of anger usually leave people disoriented and vulnerable.

If such episodes become more and more prevalent, it may be a sign of a likely relapse.

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Mental Warning Signs

At this point, the emotional warning signs outlined above may have driven a person to consider using substances again.

Most of the mental warning signs are an internal struggle between relapsing and staying strong.

The person may consider relapsing as a coping mechanism for emotional stress. Some mental stress warning include;

Having Fantasies about Relapsing

Fantasizing about relapsing is a huge mental warning sign and should be taken seriously for relapse prevention.

In most cases, constant consideration of the possibility of relapsing ends with people relapsing.

Lying

If you frequently find yourself lying about things, you may have a problem.

It is essential to be accountable to friends and family.

Dishonesty may create a platform for relapsing. By being honest, it helps with relapse prevention.

Glamorizing your Past

Always reminiscing and glamorizing former drug use can lead to a relapse.

It is important to let go of those memories and focus on making new ones.

Hanging Around Old Spots

If you constantly hang around spots where you used to do drugs, you may have a problem.

There is a higher possibility of a person relapsing in familiar environments.

Staying far away from such places is the best option for relapse prevention.

Treatment

If you have experienced any of these warning signs, you may need professional help to maintain your sobriety.

Although some relapses are one-time events, most relapses lead right back to a full-on addiction.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, our professionals are available to help you manage your triggers and warning signs.

When well managed, these warning signs are only signs.

Our professionals are experienced in dealing with relapses.

The level of experience our professionals at North Jersey Recovery Center provide the skills needed to prevent potential relapses.

To ensure that all of our clients experience the best services, we offer free insurance verification services.

The best therapy and treatment services for relapse prevention will be administered to you.

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Our personnel will contact your insurance providers directly to ensure that you get the necessary coverage for relapse prevention.

Sobriety is a journey.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we ensure that you continue to move forward on your journey.

You deserve a happy and healthy life, and this is what we aim to give to you.

National Recovery Month - New Jersey Recovery Center

National Recovery Month – Education & Celebration

With September being recognized as National Recovery Month, it is a time to reflect on the gains that individuals who have previously struggled with addiction and mental health issues have made in their journeys to recovery.

In addition, it is also a time to spread awareness on the extreme impacts that drug and alcohol addiction and mental health disorders have on millions of individuals worldwide. In fact, many people suffer from what is known as a dual diagnosis, where they may turn to addictive substances or unhealthy behaviors due to mental health disorders they are struggling with.

For the loved ones of those struggling with addiction, education is key to provide sufficient support and resources during their treatment process.

Celebrating Connections for 2020’s National Recovery Month

Often, there is a stigma that comes along with the word “addiction”. This is one of the reasons why September was designated as National Recovery Month over 20 years ago – to break this stigma and educate the public on the various aspects of addiction and mental health.

Celebrating Connections is this year’s theme for 2020’s National Recovery Month in order to emphasize the importance of both support systems and spread awareness for addiction, abuse, and mental health disorders.

As part of National Recovery Month, there are four key components surrounding aspects of awareness that remain focal points:

  • Behavioral – When you think of wellness, most people tend to think of their physical well-being. However, mental health and behavioral health are a critical part of one’s overall health and well-being. This includes aspects such as psychological and emotional well-being as well. Many times, people will turn to addictive substances or harmful behaviors to deal with their declining behavioral wellness.
  • Prevention – In order to prevent alcohol and drug abuse or addiction, it is essential that individuals are educated and informed on the various addictions, disorders, treatments, and programs. This allows a person to make an educated decision on what his or her next steps may be based on factual information and evidence-based studies and research.
  • Treatment – Initially, those struggling in these areas were hesitant to seek treatment because of the negative stigma with addiction and mental health disorders. However, over the recent years and advancements made within treatment programs, more and more individuals are getting the help they need to live an addiction-free life. Each individual has a different treatment plan based on his or her needs and requirements. These success-driven treatment plans are created by professional, licensed, and experienced rehabilitation facilitators.
  • Recovery – There is no doubt that treatment works when the commitment and effort are there. Millions of individuals all over the U.S. have grown to live a healthy life of sobriety after completing their respective treatment program and following any aftercare, such as outpatient programs, group meetings, counseling, and so on.
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The Importance of Recovery

The organization Faces & Voices of Recovery is a non-profit that advocates for recovery and treatment.

They have put together a website that provides a range of tools and resources for users to download in support of National Recovery Month.

With the pandemic that has completely shaken up the world this year, recovery is now more important than ever. Increased use of drugs and alcohol has significantly climbed due to COVID-19 with more people stuck at home – potentially causing an uptake in urges and triggers to use. Because of this, loved ones must be able to provide effective support for those struggling with addiction and mental health disorders.

We are also seeing an increase in substance abuse and mental health issues with teenagers and adolescents in the U.S. It is crucial that the public is well-informed on the dangers of addiction and undiagnosed mental health disorders, so we can do our part to support our youth and prevent further harm from occurring.

By spreading awareness on addiction and mental health, we are helping to break the stigma for those that require inpatient treatment or outpatient treatment to improve their quality of life.

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You Have Our Support & Encouragement

No one should have to go through addiction alone.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we are here for you no matter what type of struggles you may be dealing with. Whether you are located in Manhattan, New York City, Newark, Clifton, or the surrounding areas. If you are looking for an addiction treatment center in the Northeast, we are here and ready to help as we take in those struggling with addiction from all over the United States.

If you or a loved one is struggling with heroin, cocaine, pills, alcohol, or another type of substance addiction, our professional team of rehab facilitators offers a clinical approach to help you during your path of recovery. Give us a call today at 800-741-3300.

From group sessions to one-on-one counseling to proper medication, we are here to provide you with the support and resources you need to regain control of your life.

Let treatment do its job and help you move on to a better, healthier, and happier life.