Snorting Xanax or Other Benzodiazepines North Jersey Recovery Center - A man is using his fist to crush up Xanax and other benzodiazepines as he prepares for snorting Xanax to achieve the high the substance provides more quickly than swallowing the pill.

Snorting Xanax or Other Benzodiazepines

Is Snorting Xanax Dangerous?

Although it may appear safe because it is a brand-name prescription drug, snorting Xanax is incredibly dangerous.

It can be dangerous to use Xanax recreationally at all.

When someone snorts Xanax, it leads to a faster high but also results in more pronounced symptoms.

Snorting benzos, like Xanax, can also increase the likelihood of becoming addicted.

What is Xanax?

Xanax is a brand-name drug.

The generic name is alprazolam.

As a benzodiazepine, Xanax can help treat panic disorders and anxiety.

At times, it can be used for the treatment of insomnia and seizures.

Xanax is meant for short-term treatment, not a long-term medication for anxiety and other disorders.

If taken as instructed and only by prescription, Xanax is considered safe. However, someone who is snorting crushed Xanax is at risk for serious health effects. When someone takes Xanax, it calms abnormal excitatory behavior in the brain.

The drug has a calming effect on the brain and the entire central nervous system overall. It works by increasing the effects of an inhibitory brain chemical called GABA.

Xanax should not be mixed with other substances, especially with alcohol or opioids.

Alcohol and Xanax

Alcohol and Xanax slow down the central nervous system.

When combined with Xanax, it can lead to severe impairment or overdose. While it is a prescription drug, many people show signs of Xanax abuse.

Xanax can create a relaxing high when used alone. The effects can be amplified when it’s combined with other substances.

Common side effects of Xanax include:

  • Low energy
  • Depression
  • Headache
  • Confusion
  • Feeling lightheaded
  • Fainting
  • Dizziness
  • Impaired coordination
  • Memory impairment
  • Decreased libido
  • Confusion
  • Dry mouth

How Do You Take Xanax?

Typically, when you take Xanax, you do so orally.

You may be prescribed Xanax as a tablet or an extended-release tablet. There are also liquid oral solutions.

Your doctor should prescribe a dosage based on why you’re taking it, how you respond to treatment, and your weight — among other factors.

If you have a prescription, you must never take Xanax outside of how it’s prescribed. Taking Xanax in any way other than how it’s prescribed may be characterized as misuse and can be dangerous.

For example, chewing or breaking the tablets, particularly if it’s a time-release version, would mean all of the drug was released at one time.

Can You Snort Xanax?

Unfortunately, one of the most common ways to abuse Xanax is by snorting it.

When someone is snorting Xanax, they may feel the effects faster, which is one reason for doing it. Some people feel that they get more of a “high” by snorting Xanax as well.

If someone is snorting Xanax, they may be more likely to experience side effects, such as aggression, depression, or psychosis. You may also develop tolerance faster when you misuse Xanax in this way.

A tolerance occurs when your body becomes used to the effects of a drug. You then have to take larger doses to get the same effects and compensate for the shifts in your body and brain resulting from your tolerance.

If you develop a tolerance to Xanax, you may be physically dependent. When you’re physically dependent, you will likely go through withdrawal if you stop using Xanax abruptly.

Xanax withdrawal can be extremely severe and even life-threatening. Some possible withdrawal symptoms can include:

  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Insomnia
  • Severe anxiety
  • Seizures
  • Increased anxiety
  • Worsening depression
  • Panic attacks
  • Restlessness
  • Suicidal thoughts
  • Seizures or tremors

Snorting-Xanax-or-Other-Benzodiazepines-North-Jersey-Recovery-Center-1389703604

Does Addiction Risk Increase When Snorting Xanax?

Xanax is a potentially addictive substance.

With Xanax addiction, your use of the substance becomes out of your control. Addiction is a chronic, relapsing disorder, but it is treatable.

When you misuse Xanax, as would be the case if you were snorting it, it increases the likelihood of an addiction-forming.

Common signs someone is abusing or addicted to Xanax may include:

  • Chronic drowsiness
  • Slurred speech
  • Coordination problems
  • Withdrawing from friends or family
  • Manic moods
  • Memory problems
  • Lack of motivation
  • Unsuccessful attempts to cut back or stop using the drug
  • Strong cravings
  • Focusing almost entirely on obtaining more or using Xanax
  • Financial or legal problems

What Should You Do if Someone is Snorting Xanax?

Whether you might have a problem with Xanax personally or know someone who does, it’s essential to take action.

An addiction treatment program is likely the best option. Again, addiction is treatable.

However, as with any chronic disease, the longer it goes untreated, the worse it gets.

Detox from Xanax

Due to Xanax’s withdrawal’s potentially severe symptoms, it’s advisable to do a medical detox before starting treatment.

Medical detox provides patients with a safe and clinical environment as they go through difficult withdrawal symptoms.

Patients can be monitored and care for during this time so that they are as comfortable as possible. Detox is not an addiction treatment program on its own.

It’s just a way to deal with physical symptoms of withdrawal and drug dependence, but it is a necessary first step.

Types of Xanax Treatment Programs

Once someone has fully detoxed, they can begin treatment. There are different types of benzodiazepine treatment programs.

One unique option is the Partial-Care Program that North Jersey Recovery Center offers. The Partial-Care Program integrates elements of both inpatient and outpatient treatment.

Partial-Care is similar to residential treatment in that you participate in therapy most of the day throughout the week. The big difference is you can return home at night.

Inpatient treatment requires you to live onsite for a period of time. There are benefits to this, such as the fact that it can take you away from a potentially negative or triggering environment.

There’s also outpatient rehab for benzodiazepine addiction.

It may also be something you do following Partial-Care or intensive outpatient care. A critical part of your treatment plan should always include a relapse prevention strategy.

Recovery is something you work on throughout your life.

A relapse prevention strategy can include ongoing therapy, medication management, and participation in weekly 12-step meetings.

Snorting-Xanax-or-Other-Benzodiazepines-North-Jersey-Recovery-Center-594536774

Paying for Xanax Addiction Treatment

If you or your loved one needs addiction treatment, it can save your life to take the first step and contact North Jersey Recovery Center.

Our compassionate, expert providers can verify your insurance coverage and answer any questions you may have. We help you learn more about treatment for Xanax and other substances so that you know what to expect.

Understanding the Risks of Snorting Xanax

Anytime you abuse a substance like Xanax, there are risks. These risks can include mental and physical health complications.

Abusing substances can also lead to dependence and addiction. If you are snorting Xanax, you are using it outside of how it’s meant to be used.

That means that you can benefit from professional addiction treatment.

Learn more about overcoming a habit of snorting Xanax by reaching out to North Jersey Recovery Center today.

Xanax Bars - North Jersey Recovery Center - Several blue xanax bars are spread across the image. Taking more xanax than prescribed leads to abuse and addiction. The Drug rehab center at North Jersey Recovery can help with your Xanax addiction.

Xanax Bars

What is a Xanax Bar?

While most of us have heard of prescription Xanax, many are unfamiliar with the term Xanax bars.

Xanax bars are pill-sized tablets that can be broken down into quarters.

The quarters offer smaller doses of this strong benzodiazepine.

Xanax, in bars or otherwise, is prescribed to patients with anxiety disorders.

Anxiety can make you feel overwhelmed, and Xanax can increase the chemicals produced by your brain that make you feel calmer.

But nonmedical use of Xanax has become increasingly common. If you are addicted to Xanax bars, we can help.

Understanding Addictions to Xanax Bars

One of the problems with Xanax bars is that it is easy to lose track and accidentally increase your dose.

Because Xanax is addictive, this may also be done intentionally.

A quarter of a Xanax bar is the typical recommended dose.

But you may find yourself doubling it when you discover that you have developed a tolerance.

With its strong side effects and addictive qualities, this often happens quickly.

Abusing Xanax Bars

If you ingest a full Xanax bar instead of a piece of one, you may experience concerning changes in your behavior.

Common behaviors include becoming aggressive, hyperactive, or irritable is common. When your prescription is not portioned out already, it is often easier to abuse.

To combat this problem, when there is a genuine medical need, we offer medication management in our addiction treatments. This is just one of countless proven treatment methods and techniques that we take advantage of at North Jersey Recovery.

Xanax-Bars-North-Jersey-Recovery-Center-1033330072

Prescription Xanax Time Frames

Medical use of Xanax has a short time limit. Because it is strong and addictive, it is meant for short-term use.

To avoid Xanax addiction, experts recommend closely and carefully following your doctor’s instructions. Avoiding taking Xanax bars through illicit methods or in illicit settings is also a good practice.

If you have experienced troubling side effects due to your prescription, ask your doctor about less addictive alternatives.

If you are struggling with your anxiety or having difficulty sleeping, we can help you identify healthy coping mechanisms, habits, and stress-relief methods that may help.

At home, work on building a strong support system. Choose individuals who will listen and help you avoid relapsing after your addiction treatment program is complete.

Holistic remedies, like exercise, yoga, and meditation, are proven methods to round out the experience. These remedies can help improve your overall mental and physical health.

At our facility, we use a variety of proven care methods backed by science and medical evidence.

Side Effects Associated With Abusing Xanax Bars

Benzodiazepines are strong and addictive drugs. Abusing Xanax, in any form, can lead to several potential side effects. Some of the most troubling are the mental health impairments, suicides have been linked to benzodiazepines like this one.

Nearly one-third of intentional overdoses or suicide attempts involve benzodiazepines. When you begin abusing a bar drug, it is easy to increase the amount you are taking either intentionally or accidentally.

This leads to increases in both accidental and intentional overdoses.

Other potential side effects of Xanax bars may include:

  • Drowsiness or light-headedness
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Talkativeness
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Nausea
  • Constipation
  • Joint pains

The number, type, and severity of the side effects that you experience can vary depending on several factors. The amount you take, how often, and for how long are a few examples.

The side effects listed here are more often short-term. In long-term abuse or high doses, more troubling side effects are possible. Shortness of breath, seizures, and troubling mental health concerns become more likely.

Mental Health and Xanax Bars

While the short-term side effects of Xanax abuse are concerning, the long-term and mental health impairments are even more troubling. These mental health impairments can include unusual changes in your moods, thoughts, or behaviors.

Hallucinations, bouts of depression, confusion, memory problems, and thoughts of self-harm or suicide are all possibilities.

Xanax is currently the most common anti-anxiety medication in America. It treats anxiety disorders, panic disorders, and high levels of stress for some patients.

But the rule that states that it should be used in the short-term only is hard to follow. Addiction can occur quickly, whether due to mental health changes or physical dependence.

And since mental health disorders like these are some of the most common in our country, benzodiazepines like Xanax are easy to come by. From 2009 to 2014, there was a 226% increase in the number of benzodiazepine prescriptions.

Many people mistakenly believe that if a medication is prescribed, it cannot be bad for you. This belief can lead to a lifetime of abuse and addiction.

Dual Diagnosis Care

When an addiction and mental health disorder co-exist, this is called a dual diagnosis. Depression and Xanax addiction is one common example of a dual diagnosis. Xanax alters your brain chemistry, replacing normal thoughts and behaviors with uncharacteristic or damaging ones.

Compulsive cravings and behaviors are expected. Xanax bars can worsen your anxiety over time, lead to other mental health disorders, and cause troubling health impairments. Our dual diagnosis program can help you address both your mental health disorder and your addiction.

We have highly specialized and customized plans in place to address such needs.

Xanax Bars as a Stepping Stone

Xanax bars are dangerous for many reasons. Their impact on your mental health is one of the most concerning problems, but it often acts as a transition drug.

Xanax addictions often lead to other addictions. And when it is combined with other substances, Xanax becomes more dangerous. In some cases, it can be life-threatening.

One common and deadly combination is Xanax and heroin.

Combining these two drugs can interfere with your normal and important bodily functions and brain responses. It can impair your cardiac activity, increasing the risk of an overdose.

Xanax bars, alone or in conjunction with other illicit substances, are dangerous and addictive. The risks are not worth the minimal and short-term rewards. Help is available. It is time to make a change.

The Benefits of Inpatient Treatments for Xanax Bars

Most of our inpatient treatment programs begin with medical detox. Our safe, monitored, and medically assisted detox will help ease your drug cravings and withdrawal symptoms, setting you up for success moving forward.

It will restore your strength and confidence for the next steps and allow us to monitor your progress, evaluate your needs, and ensure that we are always giving you the right kind of care.

This high-level treatment program offers care, support, and guidance that cannot be matched in other settings.

You will have 24-hour access to everything you need to recover. You will participate in various proven therapies, support groups, and other therapeutic techniques, including relapse prevention and addiction management.

Other Rehab Options

We understand that a full-time program is not right for everyone. That is why we offer a variety of other customizable treatment programs that balance care and flexibility. Outpatient programs, intensive outpatient programs, partial care, and sober living have different time requirements but feature many of the same techniques and benefits.

For example, in a traditional outpatient program, you might spend five hours per week attending therapy or support groups at our facility.

In an intensive outpatient program, you might visit for up to 20 hours per week. We will work with you to determine the best program to meet your needs.

Xanax-Bars-North-Jersey-Recovery-Center-1578517882

Insurance for Addiction Treatment

Paying for your addiction treatment may be easier than you might think. If you have health insurance, your treatment program may be partially or fully covered.

Most major health insurance providers offer coverage for this type of health care. If you are unsure of what your provider covers, please call our admissions department.

They will review and verify your insurance for you. They can also outline alternative payment options if you do not have insurance.

North Jersey Recovery Center

Battling an addiction to Xanax bars can be difficult and scary.

But you do not have to face it alone.

Let the dedicated experts at North Jersey Recovery Center guide you.

We will provide all of the resources, tools, support, care, and guidance you need to make this incredible life change. You will also benefit from sharing stories and advice with others that are going through the same process.

Call today to get started.

How Long Do Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System? North Jersey Recovery Center - A man is sitting in bed taking another dose of his benzodiazepines to achieve the effect he first had when he initially took the medication for his anxiety.

How Long Do Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

Benzodiazepines & How Long They Stay in Your System

Many individuals want to know: “How long do benzodiazepines stay in your system?”

You might want to know so that you can avoid taking another dose too soon and overdosing.

If you take other medications, you might also want to avoid combining it with a benzodiazepine.

Some people wonder how long these drugs stay in your system for a drug test.

While it depends on many factors, benzodiazepines are typically detectible in your body for days or even weeks, depending on the test type.

That doesn’t mean the drugs are active, and you continue to feel the effects.

It just means a drug test could show benzodiazepines.

What are Benzodiazepines?

First, what are benzodiazepines?

This is a class of drugs available by prescription in the United States.

Common benzodiazepines include Xanax (alprazolam) and Valium (diazepam).

Other benzodiazepines include:

  • Libirum (chloridiazepoxide)
  • Estazolam
  • Restoril (temazepam)

These medications are usually prescribed for the short-term treatment of anxiety, panic disorders, and, in some cases, insomnia.

How Do Benzodiazepines Work?

When someone takes a benzodiazepine, it affects their brain chemicals and creates a calming, relaxing effect.

This is due to the effects of benzodiazepines on GABA. GABA is a neurotransmitter that calms brain activity.

By increasing the effects of GABA, benzodiazepines can reduce anxiety.

Side effects of benzodiazepines can include:

  • Confusion
  • Depression
  • Drowsiness
  • Dizziness
  • Impaired coordination
  • Vision problems
  • Headaches

The long-term use of benzodiazepines can lead to dependence and addiction. It’s also possible to overdose on benzodiazepines.

Benzodiazepine overdose is more common when these drugs are combined with other substances that slow the central nervous system — like opioids.

As such, it’s important to avoid combining any potentially dangerous medications with a benzodiazepine.

If you are prescribed one of these medicines, remember the following:

  • Follow the dosage your doctor prescribes, and take your medicine on schedule.
  • Ask your doctor what to do if you miss a dose to ensure you do not take a dose too close to another.
  • Go over any additional medications, vitamins, or supplements you take with your doctor.

How-Long-Do-Benzodiazepines-Stay-in-Your-System-North-Jersey-Recovery-Center-648505480

What Effects How Long Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

How long do benzodiazepines stay in your system?

First, it depends on the specific drug you are taking. There are short-, medium- and long-acting benzodiazepines.

Xanax is a longer-acting benzodiazepine. If you were to take Xanax, peak levels would occur in your blood around one to two hours after.

The half-life of Xanax in the blood is just over 11 hours in most healthy adults. Half-life means half the drug taken has been eliminated in your urine at that time.

It takes around five half-lives for your body to clear 98% of a drug.

That would mean it could take anywhere from two to four days for a dose of Xanax to be entirely eliminated from your body. However, that doesn’t mean that it wouldn’t show up in a drug test earlier.

How long do benzos stay in your urine?

For a short-acting benzodiazepine, it could show up in a urine test for up to four days. It can show up in a blood test for up to 24 hours and in saliva for up to two and a half days.

A longer-acting benzodiazepine could show up in a drug test even longer.

Common shorter-acting benzodiazepines include:

  • Estazolam
  • Flurazepam
  • Triazolam
  • Midazolam
  • Temazepam

Common longer-acting benzodiazepines include:

  • Alprazolam
  • Clorazepate
  • Diazepam
  • Halazepam
  • Lorazepam
  • Oxazepam
  • Prazepam
  • Quazepam
  • Clonazepam

Additional Effects That Contribute to How Long Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System

Along with the drug itself, there are individual factors that play a role in how long benzodiazepines stay in your system.

Some of these common factors include:

  • Age: Typically, the younger you are, the healthier you are. You are also less likely to be on multiple medications. This can mean that your body may eliminate benzodiazepines faster than someone older. While the average half-life for Xanax is around 11 hours in healthy, young adults, it can go up to 16 hours in seniors.
  • Alcohol: If you combine Xanax with alcohol, it can lead to fatal consequences. It can also take longer for the Xanax to leave your system.
  • Ethnicity: Some ethnic backgrounds have demonstrated longer elimination times for drugs. For example, people of Asian descent have half-lives from 15% to 25% longer than Caucasians.
  • Organ Problems: Organs, especially the liver, play an important role in eliminating substances like benzodiazepines. If you have a condition such as chronic liver disease, it’s harder for your body to break down and eliminate certain substances.
  • Weight: If you’re overweight or have a higher percentage of body fat, it’s harder for your body to break down substances, including benzodiazepines, leading to a longer half-life.
  • Metabolism: If you have a higher metabolism or are physically active, you may see that benzodiazepines stay in your system for a shorter time period.
  • Frequency and Duration of Usage: If you frequently use benzodiazepines, your body can take longer to eliminate the substances in your system.

Getting Help for Benzodiazepine Addiction

If you are struggling with benzodiazepine addiction, you aren’t alone.

There are treatment programs available. Medical detox can be a good starting point due to the potential severity of benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms.

During medical detox, your symptoms can be safely managed in a controlled environment. Following medical detox, you might begin an inpatient or outpatient treatment program.

Determining the type of program that is best for you depends on the severity of your addiction and any other addictions to other substances.

If you have a co-occurring mental health disorder, you might need a more intensive treatment program, such as inpatient rehab.

There are hybrid programs available at North Jersey Recovery Center, like the Partial-Care Program.

There are intensive outpatient treatment programs that take place most of the day and throughout the week. However, in the evenings, you can return home.

No matter what treatment program you enroll in, you will have a team of compassionate and trained professionals who create personalized treatment plans for you and your needs.

Following treatment, you should have plans for relapse prevention during your recovery.

This might include having a recovery coach or participating in 12-step programs regularly.

How-Long-Do-Benzodiazepines-Stay-in-Your-System-North-Jersey-Recovery-Center-178311602

Summing Up: How Long do Benzodiazepines Stay in Your System?

“How long does 1 benzodiazepine stay in your system?”

Consider the following:

  • You can expect a half-life of five hours or less for ultra short-acting benzodiazepines.
  • Short- and intermediate benzodiazepines have a half-life ranging from 5 to 24 hours.
  • Long-acting benzodiazepines have half-lives that are 24 hours or more.

To learn more about caring and effective addiction treatment programs, call North Jersey Recovery Center today.

We will answer any questions you may have and provide you with information about program options.

We can also verify your insurance coverage and work with you each step of the way for admissions and during treatment and recovery.