How Long Alcohol is in Your System North Jersey Recovery Center - A man sits at a bar drinking a beer, which leads to alcohol in your system and can cause harmful effects and even lead to addiction if not monitored carefully.

How Long Alcohol is in Your System

How Long are Five Standard Drinks Are Metabolized in?

People often wonder how long it takes to metabolize a standard drink and how fast you detoxify alcohol per hour.

The short answer is that it depends, but there is more to it than that.

What is BAC?

When asking how long alcohol is in your system or how long it takes to metabolize a standard drink, the term BAC is important.

BAC is blood alcohol content. This is the percentage of alcohol in a person’s bloodstream.

If you have a BAC of .10%, your blood contains one part of alcohol for every 1000 parts of blood.

In most states, you are considered legally intoxicated with a BAC of .08% or higher.

Individual factors that can affect BAC include:

  • The number of standard drinks you have
  • The amount of time you consume the drinks within
  • Enzyme levels and production
  • Gender
  • Bodyweight
  • Medications
  • Whether or not you’ve eaten before drinking

How Much is a Standard Drink?

Most of us do not have an accurate idea of how much is in a standard drink.

The following are examples of a standard drink:

  • One 12 oz. beer
  • One 7 oz. malt liquor
  • A 5 oz. glass of wine
  • 1.5 oz shot of hard liquor

For example, if you were to have a 12-ounce margarita, that would not be a standard drink. That would equal anywhere from two to four standard drinks.

Effects of Alcohol at Different BAC Levels

While every person is different, the following are some of the effects that might occur at different BAC levels:

  • At a BAC of .01-.03, your mood could be mildly elevated. There may not be many outward effects.
  • With a BAC of .04-.06, effects can include feelings of warmth and relaxation. Declines in memory and reasoning may occur.
  • From BAC levels of .07-.09, there may be a slight impairment. It is legal in most places to drive at this level.
  • By the time someone’s BAC reaches .10 to .12, there is likely a significant loss of judgment and impairment. Slurred speech may be noticeable.
  • From .13 to .15, there may be major impairment, including blurry vision and problems with motor control.
  • Levels of .16 to .20 may include nausea and a sloppy outward appearance.
  • Levels of .25 to .30 would mean someone is severely intoxicated.

If someone’s BAC were higher than .30, that could mean they would suffer from alcohol poisoning.

Alcohol poisoning is a medical emergency.

When you drink too much too quickly, you can’t break down the alcohol fast enough.

Binge drinking is the most common reason for alcohol poisoning.

Symptoms of alcohol poisoning include vomiting, reduced body temperature, and passing out.

Alcohol poisoning can lead to brain damage or asphyxiation, and it can be deadly.

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How Does Your Body Metabolize Alcohol?

When you drink alcohol, it enters the digestive system.

Alcohol is digested differently than food or other drinks, though.

Around 20% of alcohol from one drink will go straight to the body’s blood vessels. Then, it goes to the brain.

The rest (80%) goes to your small intestine and then to your bloodstream.

Finally, your liver removes the alcohol.

How Long are Five Standard Drinks Metabolized in?

Back to the original question: How long are five standard drinks metabolized in?

Again, it depends.

In general, most people break down half a standard drink every hour.

If you were initially at a BAC of .08, and you did not drink anything else, your BAC would lower at a rate of around 0.015 an hour.

If you took just one small shot of liquor, it would take your body about an hour to metabolize it.

If you had one pint of beer, it would take two hours.

A large glass of wine would take three hours.

For five standard drinks, it would take at least several hours to metabolize.

Urine and Breath Tests

If you wonder how long is alcohol in your system, you may also wonder about detection tests, such as urine and breath tests.

A urine test can typically detect alcohol in your system between 12 and 48 hours after you drink.

Detection on breath tests is a shorter window of time.

A breath test can detect alcohol for around 24 hours.

A breathalyzer can measure your BAC.

If your BAC is above 0.02, it is considered unsafe to drive.

Factors that Affect How Long it Takes to Metabolize a Standard Drink

As we touched on above, there are individual factors that affect the rate your body processes alcohol.

Some of these factors include:

  • Age: The older you are, the longer alcohol remains in your liver before moving to your bloodstream or before it is metabolized. The older you are, the longer you are likely to be intoxicated if you drink.
  • Sex: Men and women metabolize alcohol differently. Alcohol typically stays in a woman’s system longer. This is likely because women have a lower percentage of water in their bodies than men. Women also have a higher body fat percentage. Hormones also impact how your body processes alcohol.
  • Food: If you eat before drinking, it can help dilute alcohol. Having a full stomach can also slow your stomach’s emptying to the small intestine. If you have an empty stomach, your BAC can be as much as three times higher than someone who ate before drinking.
  • Body size: The higher your body fat percentage, the higher your BAC usually is.
  • Medications: Different medications impact how long it takes your body to process alcohol. Some medicines slow down metabolism, which can play a role. Some medicines also slow down the emptying of the stomach to the small intestine and liver. That means alcohol is rapidly absorbed, leading to higher BAC levels.

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Final Thoughts on Alcohol in Your System

In conclusion, it is very much dependent on the individual concerning how long alcohol is in your system.

For most people, it would take a minimum of several hours, but it could be more.

Individual factors play a big role in how your body can detoxify alcohol per hour.

If you are struggling with alcohol use, binge drinking, or feel that you could have a problem, consider an alcohol treatment program.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we offer various types of programs. No matter what program you take part in, it is always customized to your specific needs.

Our staff is caring and compassionate but also skilled in helping people work toward their recovery goals.

We encourage you to contact us to learn more about our program offerings.

Our team can also verify your insurance and determine your coverage.

Alcohol abuse can lead to financial and legal problems and mental and physical health problems.

Take steps to help yourself today.

North Jersey Recovery Center is ready to help today.

The 7 Types of Alcoholics North Jersey Recovery Center - A depressed young male sits on a couch staring at a beer bottle and a glass filled with beer as he contemplates his alcohol use and if he fits into the different types of alcoholics or not.

The 7 Types of Alcoholics

Are There Different Types of Alcoholics?

What are the different types of alcoholics? Are there seven types of alcoholics?

This is a common question, but it’s one that gets misconstrued.

While research has depicted seven types of alcoholics, we will discuss five types of alcoholics based on what we know about addiction at this time.

Understanding the types of alcoholics first relies on having an understanding of alcohol use disorder (AUD).

What is an Alcoholic?

An alcoholic is someone who meets the criteria for alcohol use disorder.

Alcohol use disorder or alcoholism is a pattern of ongoing alcohol abuse.

Characteristics of alcohol use disorder include:

  • Problems controlling your drinking
  • Drinking even when it causes problems
  • Being preoccupied or obsessed with drinking

You can have unhealthy drinking patterns without being an alcoholic.

For example, binge drinking is considered unhealthy drinking, which is especially common among young people.

However, not everyone who binge drinks meets the criteria for alcohol use disorder.

If your drinking causes distress or problems in your daily life, you likely would be diagnosed with an alcohol use disorder.

As with other addictions, alcohol use disorder can range from mild to severe.

What are the Symptoms of Being an Alcoholic?

An alcoholic is diagnosed with an alcohol use disorder based on a specific set of criteria.

This criterion typically includes:

  • Being unable to limit how much you drink
  • Trying and being unsuccessful at cutting down how much you drink
  • Spending much of your time getting alcohol, drinking, or recovering from the effects of alcohol
  • Not meeting obligations because of alcohol
  • Continuing to drink despite problems in relationships, at work, or school
  • Developing a tolerance requiring you to drink more to get the same effects
  • Being dependent on alcohol and having withdrawal symptoms if you don’t drink

Types of Alcoholics

As was mentioned above, some people believe there are seven types of alcoholics.

In reality, there are likely closer to five types.

These are also called subtypes of alcoholics.

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Young Adult Subtype

Among the types of alcoholics, the young adult subtype is the most common.

This type of alcoholic refers to people between the ages of 18 and 25.

Within this group, the average age at which someone develops an alcohol addiction is 20 years old.

Someone in a young adult subtype might drink less than other types of alcoholics.

However, they will often binge drink when they do.

Someone who is a young adult subtype alcoholic might have an average of 14 drinks a day when they drink.

This group, among other types of alcoholics, is the least likely to get help.

The reduced number of people seeking treatment in this group is because it is usually seen as normal.

When you’re a young adult, partying and drinking may seem like something everyone is doing at that age.

Young Antisocial Subtype

Another type of alcoholic is known as the young antisocial subtype.

These are people who are young adults and may have antisocial personality disorders.

There may be other mental health issues that occur along with a personality disorder.

People who fall into the young antisocial subtype group tend to behave recklessly, increasing the likelihood of developing an alcohol use disorder.

Functional Subtype

Functional alcoholics is another subtype of alcoholics that many people have heard of or are familiar with.

Functional alcoholics don’t always appear to have an alcohol use disorder.

This type of alcoholism generally appears during middle age.

Someone who is a functional alcoholic will often live a completely normal life and can even be very successful.

However, they might drink excessively in the evenings — often as a way to relax.

Some of the issues of functional alcoholism include that it can cause physical health problems.

Problematic patterns of drinking can also be troublesome in terms of relationships.

It is challenging for functional alcoholics to realize there is a problem.

This makes them less likely to seek treatment.

Intermediate Familial Subtype

Someone with a family history of alcoholism may have an intermediate family subtype.

This can stem from different scenarios depending on the specific circumstances.

If someone is raised in an environment of heavy drinking, they may begin to replicate the same patterns.

There may also be a genetic component.

We know that one of the underlying risk factors for alcoholism is genetics.

People in the intermediate familial subtype often have co-occurring mental health problems, such as clinical depression or bipolar disorder.

These mental health conditions have a genetic component as well.

Chronic Severe Subtype

In most cases, chronic severe subtype is the most damaging subtype compared to the different types of alcoholics.

Someone who is in the chronic severe subtype will often drink excessively daily.

Someone who falls under this type of alcoholic is likely to have many physical and lifestyle factors destroyed as a result. Unfortunately, they continue to drink.

Physical dependence is prominent in the severe chronic subtype.

This means that if someone tries to change their drinking patterns, they will likely experience intense withdrawal symptoms.

Around 80% of people in the severe chronic subtype have a familial and genetic alcoholism link.

Someone in this category is also more likely to abuse other drugs too.

If you are concerned about your drinking patterns or someone else’s drinking habits, the below questions are ones you may want to ask yourself or your loved one to determine if there is a problem or not.

  • Do you have a problem stopping drinking once you start?
  • Do you lose control when you start drinking?
  • Do you want to stop drinking but find that you aren’t able to?
  • Do you have cravings for alcohol?
  • Do you keep using alcohol even though it’s causing problems in relationships?
  • Do you ever give up activities to drink instead?
  • Do you drink when it’s risky to do so?
  • Do you need alcohol to feel “normal?”

Help for Different Types of Alcoholics?

If you recognize the signs or symptoms of alcoholism either in yourself or someone you care about, treatment options are available.

The type of treatment you may benefit most from can depend on the category you fall into.

For example, if you’re a functional alcoholic, outpatient treatment may work well for you. This would allow you to continue living and working as normal but receive treatment at the same time.

For someone who is a chronic severe alcoholic, treatment would likely need to be much more intensive.

Treatment might include a supervised medical detox to deal with dangerous withdrawal symptoms.

Then, someone who is a chronic severe alcoholic might start an inpatient program.

Following inpatient treatment, they could live in a sober living house and begin their relapse prevention plan.

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Paying for Treatment

If someone is an alcoholic, they should seek treatment sooner rather than later.

Alcoholism of any kind is a progressing, chronic illness.

This means the longer it goes untreated, the worse the symptoms and outcomes will likely be.

If you are looking for treatment programs, contact North Jersey Recovery Center.

Our program options range from intensive residential treatment to outpatient care.

Our team can verify your insurance coverage to help determine the costs of addiction treatment.

Final Takeaways

There are five different types of alcoholics.

Understanding what these are can help you better identify a problem, whether in yourself or in someone you love.

When you know what type of alcoholic you are, you can also identify what treatment programs could be best.

Is Alcohol a Depressant? North Jersey Recovery Center - A group of individuals attending an inpatient alcohol rehab for alcoholism is engaging in a group therapy session and discussing topics, such as: "Is alcohol a depressant?" as well as other helpful tools and resources to support each other as they continue on their journeys to recovery.

Is Alcohol a Depressant?

Is Alcohol a Stimulant or Depressant?

A pressing question for those trying to understand their alcohol addiction may be: “Is alcohol a depressant?” The answer is yes.

Alcohol is a central nervous system depressant, and it often accomplishes the opposite of what it is meant to. While many people drink to improve their mood, alcohol can worsen it.

Alcohol harms your mental and physical health. It can alter moods, behaviors, and overall functioning.

At the moment, it may help you relax.

However, its side effects and the inevitable hangover increase your anxieties later.

If you are battling alcoholism, our comprehensive addiction programs will help break the cycle.

Why is Alcohol a Depressant?

Alcohol can be hard to categorize because it mimics the effects of both stimulant and depressant drugs.

This tends to lead to some confusion. Alcohol is a tricky substance.

To a certain extent, it may boost your energy levels or moods. On these occasions, it feels as if alcohol is a stimulant.

However, clarity comes with the crash. At this point, it becomes clear why alcohol is a depressant; it slows down your brain’s ability to function and its neurological activities. This occurs because it enhances the effect of a particular neurotransmitter in your brain.

Alcohol also alters your reactions to certain events. When you are under the influence, you may feel slow to respond.

Side effects, like slurring your speech, experiencing unsteadiness in your movements, anger, confusion, and slowed reaction times, are all common.

Alcohol impairs your mental health, too. Alcohol distorts your judgment and makes it challenging to think rationally. Its diminishment of your judgment and ability to think clearly make it easier to make poor choices. These poor choices often lead to accidents, bouts of violence, driving under the influence, and criminal activities.

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Alcoholism in America

Another common question for those battling alcohol addictions is whether or not they are alone. If you are wondering the same thing, the answer is no; you are not alone. Alcohol use disorders are some of the most common substance abuse disorders we see today.

Nearly 18 million American adults have a reported alcohol use disorder. But even still, this may not reflect the full picture.

Many alcohol addictions go untreated, undiagnosed, or unacknowledged. Alcohol use disorders affect a multitude of individuals, families, and communities.

The normalization and ease of access to alcohol are two factors that make it easy to abuse and easy to hide.

What is the Best Way to Address Alcoholism?

Whether as a celebration or a way to ease stress, most American adults drink alcohol. But pretending the problem does not exist will not make the problem better or disappear on its own. Pretending you are fine because you know others who drink as much as you do will not make your addiction easier to overcome.

The best way to understand, address, and overcome your addiction is to accept the help offered and available to you.

Our dedicated professionals will provide care, support, and guidance at each stage of your journey. It is time to change your life for the better.

Where Did My Alcohol Use Disorder Come From?

Addiction is a chronic disease.

It alters your brain’s chemistry and changes our thoughts and behaviors. The idea that addiction equates to a lack of willpower is a false and damaging one.

Many people have a genetic predisposition to becoming an alcoholic, as alcoholism tends to run in families. It has impacted the lives of millions of families over the years. Growing up in a household that normalizes alcohol abuse makes it even harder to avoid.

Other common contributors to alcoholism rates in America include social and environmental challenges. Stressful careers or relationships, underlying mental health disorders, and trauma are also often linked to alcoholism.

Whether alcoholism runs in your family or other factors have contributed to your addiction, we can help.

A big piece of addiction treatment is understanding why your addiction occurred in the first place. By identifying your concerns, triggers, and temptations, you can effectively address them.

You can choose healthy habits, social networks, and coping mechanisms instead.

Alcoholism and Mental Health

After genetics, mental health disorders are some of the most common causes of alcohol use disorders.

What makes this even more tricky is that alcoholism does not always come first. You may begin drinking to cope with symptoms of a diagnosed or undiagnosed mental health disorder, or your drinking may lead to a mental health disorder.

In either order, this combination can lead to short-term and long-term mental and physical health impairments.

The combination of a mental health disorder and substance abuse disorder is called a dual diagnosis. We offer a specialized program to address this type of disorder.

Some of the most common dual diagnosis combinations include substance abuse and:

  • Generalized anxiety disorders
  • Panic disorders
  • Post-traumatic stress disorders
  • Depression
  • Bipolar disorders
  • Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorders
  • Psychotic illnesses
  • Borderline personality disorders
  • Antisocial personality disorders
  • Schizophrenia

There are many different possible dual diagnosis combinations.

Whether your mental illness is diagnosed or unconfirmed, we can help. We will see you through from our first phone call to our addiction aftercare services.

Alcohol Addiction Treatments

Many alcohol addiction programs begin with a medically assisted detox. This type of detox will ease your withdrawal symptoms and cravings to make the process easier. Free from temptations and distractions, you will have a safe place to focus on building a happy, healthy, and sober life. This detox will restore your strength and confidence, setting you up for success.

From there, we offer various proven treatment programs and methods. We customize each program based on your needs rather than offering cookie-cutter or unspecific pre-written programs.

We evaluate your addiction with you to ensure we choose the right care settings and methods.

Whether you choose the 24-hour inpatient setting, the flexible outpatient care, or a supplemental program, you will have access to the resources, tools, care, and support you need.

We also help with multiple or polysubstance addictions, underlying mental health disorders, and other complications.

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Paying for Alcohol Rehab

In recent years, it has become easier to find affordable and flexible addiction treatments. Part of this is due to changes in health insurance coverage laws.

Most major health insurance providers now offer coverage for addiction treatments.

You may have partial or full coverage for your alcohol rehab program.

If you are unsure of what your coverage entails, please call our admissions department.

They will review and verify your insurance for you. They will also outline alternative payment options if you do not have insurance.

North Jersey Recovery Center

Your alcoholism can only define you if you allow it to.

If you are ready to take back the reins and regain control of your life, we are ready to help you get there.

We will walk the path to recovery with you.

We will be there every step of the way.

Through proven care methods, individualized treatment programs, and various continued care options, we help you identify and achieve your goals.

Call us today for more information.

Is Alcohol a Drug North Jersey Recovery Center - A woman is struggling with her dependence on alcohol because is alcohol a drug? She is debating seeking treatment for her alcohol addiction

Is Alcohol a Drug?

Understanding Alcoholism and Where to Turn for Help

 
Many of us look forward to a few beers after work or a glass of wine while cooking dinner.

If we were to log how much alcohol we consume every week, we might notice a pattern that repeats itself.

Is it possible we are addicted to alcohol?

Is alcohol a drug?

It turns out that alcohol is a drug because it falls within the class of depressants.

You CAN become addicted to alcohol, which is referred to as “alcoholism.”


What is Alcohol?

 
Alcohol is a drink that is produced through fermentation.

The ingredients often include grains, fruits, sugar, yeast, and water.

We commonly know alcohol as beer, wine, and liquor, but is alcohol a drug?

Origins of Alcohol

Alcoholic beverages go thousands of years back.

A sense of pleasure and relaxation became the basis for drinking alcohol.

  • Evidence of alcohol appeared from the discovery of beer jugs dating back to around 10,000 B.C.
  • Egyptian hieroglyphics from around 4,000 B.C. indicate drinking wine is mentioned throughout the Bible as well.

As the 19th century rolled in, limitations on drinking alcohol were enforced, especially through prohibition.

Since then, alcohol has been regulated by laws restricting certain age groups from buying and drinking.

However, these laws often fail to curb the use of alcohol.

Young people still find ways to drink, and alcohol has become common in most social gatherings and events.

Ingredients in Alcohol

The combination of sugars and yeast, and other ingredients, causes a chemical process that produces ethanol.

It is this ethanol that, when consumed, changes the way our brain and body function.

Different types of alcoholic beverages contain varying amounts of ethanol.

Certain drinks will cause more intense symptoms than others.

The higher the alcohol content, the stronger the symptoms.

Addiction is not affected by the content of alcohol.

It can happen whether you consume beer or the hard stuff.

The main question is: Is alcohol a drug?

Alcohol Content in Different Types of Drinks

High Content:

  • Moonshine 100%
  • Liqueurs up to 60%
  • Vodka up to 50%
  • Whiskey up to 50%
  • Tequila up to 40%
  • Rum up to 40%


Low Content:

  • Wine and Wine Coolers up to 20%
  • Ciders and Ales up to 8%
  • Beer up to 6%

Alcohol is a Drug

Is alcohol a drug? If so, what kind of drug is alcohol?

Alcohol is a type of depressant, similar to many prescription drugs.

Alcohol may not be “prescribed,” but it affects the brain in many of the same ways that other drugs do.

Prescription Depressants:

  • Tranquilizers
  • Antipsychotics
  • Sedatives
  • Sleeping pills

 
Is alcohol a drug that is considered as bad as prescription depressants?

Yes, alcohol is just as addictive as Xanax, Lunesta, Klonopin, or any other depressant.

Effects of Alcohol

The side effects of alcohol are what drives us to seek it out and drink it.

How many of us go to a social gathering and enjoy a beer or glass of wine?

Do those drinks help you to relax and be more sociable?

The marriage of food and alcohol is often enjoyed, especially with BBQs, dinner parties, and cocktail hours.

Why? Because the “side effects” of alcohol can loosen us up to have more fun.

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Short-term Side Effects of Alcohol

The most immediate side effect of alcohol is that it makes us feel drunk.

These are some of the symptoms of drunkenness:
 

  • Sense of calm, relaxation
  • Impaired motor skills
  • Lack of coordination
  • Impaired thinking
  • Dizziness
  • Slurred speech
  • Feeling tired
  • Lower heartbeat, blood pressure, breathing
  • Overall feeling of sadness
  • Urination difficulty
  • Blackouts

Long-term Side Effects of Alcohol

Is alcohol a drug that can cause serious and lasting side effects?

Yes, alcohol is the root of alcoholism, which is an addiction. 

Long term use of alcohol changes our brains and bodies in ways we may not be aware of.

Mental and Physical Side Effects

  • Addiction (alcoholism)
  • Alcohol poisoning
  • Loss of sex drive
  • Permanent brain damage
  • Liver damage/disease
  • Malnutrition
  • Blackouts
  • Stroke
  • High blood pressure
  • Heart disease
  • Ulcers
  • Gastritis
  • Cancer
  • Permanent nerve damage
  • Worsening of mental disorders
  • Suicidal thoughts/tendencies
  • Suicide
  • Death
  • Moodiness
  • Abusive behavior
  • Fetal deformities
  • Fetal Alcohol Syndrome
  • Stillbirth
  • Miscarriage
  • Development of Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome
    • An alarming 80% of alcoholics are deficient in thiamine. This deficiency can lead to Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome, which is a brain disorder causing encephalopathy or psychosis.

Social Side Effects

  • Divorce
  • Relationship strain
  • Self-isolation
  • Indirect harm through accidents
  • Loss of job
  • Loss of friends
  • Loss of home
  • Financial strain
  • Drunk driving that can lead to arrest or imprisonment
  • Loss of driving privileges
  • Arrest and imprisonment
  • Requiring a lifetime of someone caring for you

Mental Illness and Alcoholism

 
Is alcohol a drug that worsens existing mental disorders?

In short, yes, it can.

Alcohol abuse is associated with numerous mental disorders and can exacerbate their severity.
 

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Mental Disorders Associated with Alcoholism

Alcohol Abuse Leads to Addiction

Why is alcohol a drug of choice for so many of us?

Alcohol does not require a prescription and is obtainable by merely going to the store.

Is alcohol a drug that only affects adults? No, it has the same addictive ability for teens, middle-aged adults, as well as the elderly.

When is alcohol abuse a drug problem?

The varying demographics of alcohol abuse and addiction are startling in contrast to what many of us think.

Under-Age Alcohol Abuse Within the U.S. during 2018:

  • Approximately 7.1 million under the age of 20 consumed alcohol, of which 19.5% were females, and 18.2% were males.
  • Approximately 4.3 million under the age of 20 participated in binge drinking.
  • Approximately 861,000 (2.3% of the age-group population) under the age of 20 heavily abused alcohol.

 
Older Adults and Alcohol Abuse Within the U.S. during 2018:

  • 3% of adults admit to drinking alcohol.
  • 45% of adults admit to binge drinking.
  • 6% of adults admit to heavily abusing alcohol.

 
A study done in 2012 indicated that 10% of children in the U.S. had an alcoholic parent.
 
When is alcohol use an addiction?

  • You crave it and cannot go for long periods without it.
  • You drink all throughout the day or night.
  • You cannot enjoy social events without drinking.
  • You spend your last dollar on alcohol.
  • You become violent and abusive towards your loved ones.
  • You prefer to drink alone.

 
If you see yourself in any of the above scenarios, facts, or statistics, you need help.

Many of us with an addiction to alcohol do not view ourselves as alcoholics.

Taking the first step in admitting you are an alcoholic is the hardest part of this recovery journey.

Reaching Out for Help

When you continue to allow alcohol to control you and your life, you stand to lose so much.

Your sense of pride, independence, and your loved ones are far more precious than a drink.

Even worse, can you live with yourself if you drink and drive and end up killing someone?

Did you know that someone dies because of a drunk driver every 50 minutes in the U.S.?

How Do You Get Help?

Admitting you have a drinking problem is the first and hardest step.

Now it is time to get help from professionals who will be by your side the entire time.

The next step to take is to make that call.
 
North Jersey Recovery Center is a leading treatment facility for alcoholism.

We have a professional standing by 24/7 to take your phone call.

The moment you speak with someone, you will be embraced with compassion.

Inpatient

Detox is a necessary step to rid your body of alcohol.

You will be admitted as an inpatient where you have the choice of social or medical detox.

A team of medical professionals will be by your side during the entire process until you have stabilized.

After you are stable, you will then advance to the “inpatient hospitalization” program, where you ease back into life while still residing at the facility.

Outpatient

When you have graduated to the outpatient program, you will visit the facility as scheduled to continue treatment.

For those who need to plan their treatment around work, children, or school, we offer “intensive outpatient therapy.”

Payment and Insurance

Our staff is more than happy to verify your insurance on your behalf to make things easier for you. You also have the option to use our online verification form to do it yourself.


Regaining Control to Live a Full Life

Treatment is a gift to yourself and to those you love.

Do not let alcohol slowly strip you of the most valuable things and pleasures of life.

You have value and worth, and who knows, you may be the one who inspires someone else with the same problem to find help.

Be their inspiration!

Relapse Prevention Triggers and Warning Signs North Jersey Recovery Center - A man relapses with his alcohol addiction because he was unaware of how to handle his prevention triggers and warning signs

Relapse Prevention Triggers and Warning Signs

Relapse – One of the Biggest Fears a Someone Recovering from Addiction

One of the biggest fears of every person that is recovering from addiction is relapsing. Recovery from addiction usually comes with a lot of different challenges.

Sobriety is often described as a journey because of the length of time it takes to get to a safe and healthy place. Addiction is a war that lasts a lifetime. Battling addiction while dealing with the day-to-day challenges that come with life is extremely tasking.

Those in recovery agree that there are so many different triggers that may cause a relapse.

Avoiding these triggers and thriving is very difficult but still possible.

To relapse simple means to slip back into a former state.

In this case, a relapse means moving back into drug use and abuse.

One important thing to note is that a decline can happen at any time.

In some cases, a relapse may be a one-time thing only.

In other cases, a relapse may lead to several other declines and, eventually, back to addiction. What determines whether relapse is a one-time thing or if it is not is how it is managed.

Individuals in recovery need to be able to recognize their possible relapse triggers and have a relapse plan to handle them.

Triggers

In most cases, triggers vary from person to person.

However, some universal triggers have been identified.

These situations make recovering addicts susceptible to relapse.

Better understanding these triggers can help with relapse preventions.

Unrealistic Expectations

A lot of individuals recovering from addiction expect their lives to completely change after overcoming addiction.

It is natural to feel that after such a significant life adjustment, major changes should begin to happen. The disappointment that comes when these expectations are not fulfilled can be a relapse trigger.

Those in recovery should learn to pace themselves. Understanding that recovery is a process that may take some time goes a long way in preventing a relapse. Part of recovery is getting your life back, and this can take some time.

Old/Familiar Friendships

Falling back into old habits with old acquaintances can also be a trigger for relapses.

Friends may remind you of the euphoria of drug use, while leaving out the bad parts.

Those in recovery need to avoid or limit their interactions with old friends. Being around old friends allows you to consider drugs as an option when you are in bad situations.

To ultimately ensure that drugs are not a solution for anything, you must keep old friends, who encourage bad habits, away.

Anger

Even sober people can find themselves doing unnatural things when angry.

For recovering individuals, anger should be monitored closely as a trigger.

Most of these individuals may feel an urge to resort to drug use to deal with anger.

Those who have struggled with addiction must learn how to process anger without drugs.

It is also vital to avoid getting angry as much as they can. Anger management can be treated with Cognitive Behavior Therapy.

Loneliness

A lot of recovering individuals deal with loneliness. This emotion is dangerous because they may use pills or other substances to numb the loneliness.

Whenever you may feel lonely, take some time to join a support group to distract yourself.

As much as possible, recovering persons should avoid being lonely because it is a trigger.

It is important to be surrounded by friends and a network of supporters who can engage you well enough to prevent a relapse.

Hunger

Although it is hardly talked about, being hungry can cloud judgment.

It is important that those in recovery eat healthy and frequently.

Having a good meal makes you less likely to slip-up and relapse.

Regular meals and healthy snacks are important to prevent any potential relapses.

Fatigue

Recovering persons need to pace themselves.

The initial excitement of being drug-free may lead many recovering individuals to take on more than they can handle. It is important to ensure that you expend energy consciously.

Fatigue makes anyone vulnerable, and it is crucial to avoid situations that may cause a recovering person vulnerable.

If you are spread too thin, you may begin to look for other sources of energy, which may lead you back to square one.

Relapse Prevention Warning Signs

Identifying triggers is one of the first steps to preventing relapse.

However, it is just as important to recognize what signs may indicate that a relapse is possible. 

Understanding the warning signs of relapse allows you to take precautionary steps to prevent relapse.

The decline is more of a process than an isolated event. Relapses are usually a three-step process: emotional, mental and physical.

The warning signs of a relapse can also be classified into these three categories:

Emotional Warning Signs

Emotional warning signs are usually part of the process where the person begins to feel negative emotions.

At this point, most people have no intention of relapsing.

Certain emotions must be monitored closely to ensure that they do not lead to a relapse.

Anxiety

Anxiety is a major emotional sign of a relapse.

When a person begins to worry intensely about the future, they are more vulnerable to relapse.

Worrying about things that cannot be controlled usually pushes recovering persons to find escapes. Recurring feelings of anxiety are a warning sign.

Mood Swings

Mood swings are usually indicative of a potential relapse.

In most instances, the highs and lows of mood swings usually leave the recovering individuals vulnerable.

Where you notice a repeated pattern of mood swings, it is essential to seek help.

Anger

Anger can also be indicative of a potential relapse.

Frequent outbursts of anger usually leave people disoriented and vulnerable.

If such episodes become more and more prevalent, it may be a sign of a likely relapse.

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Mental Warning Signs

At this point, the emotional warning signs outlined above may have driven a person to consider using substances again.

Most of the mental warning signs are an internal struggle between relapsing and staying strong.

The person may consider relapsing as a coping mechanism for emotional stress. Some mental stress warning include;

Having Fantasies about Relapsing

Fantasizing about relapsing is a huge mental warning sign and should be taken seriously for relapse prevention.

In most cases, constant consideration of the possibility of relapsing ends with people relapsing.

Lying

If you frequently find yourself lying about things, you may have a problem.

It is essential to be accountable to friends and family.

Dishonesty may create a platform for relapsing. By being honest, it helps with relapse prevention.

Glamorizing your Past

Always reminiscing and glamorizing former drug use can lead to a relapse.

It is important to let go of those memories and focus on making new ones.

Hanging Around Old Spots

If you constantly hang around spots where you used to do drugs, you may have a problem.

There is a higher possibility of a person relapsing in familiar environments.

Staying far away from such places is the best option for relapse prevention.

Treatment

If you have experienced any of these warning signs, you may need professional help to maintain your sobriety.

Although some relapses are one-time events, most relapses lead right back to a full-on addiction.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, our professionals are available to help you manage your triggers and warning signs.

When well managed, these warning signs are only signs.

Our professionals are experienced in dealing with relapses.

The level of experience our professionals at North Jersey Recovery Center provide the skills needed to prevent potential relapses.

To ensure that all of our clients experience the best services, we offer free insurance verification services.

The best therapy and treatment services for relapse prevention will be administered to you.

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Our personnel will contact your insurance providers directly to ensure that you get the necessary coverage for relapse prevention.

Sobriety is a journey.

At North Jersey Recovery Center, we ensure that you continue to move forward on your journey.

You deserve a happy and healthy life, and this is what we aim to give to you.